Law and Economics

daphna-lewinsohn-zamir

Prof. Daphna Lewinsohn-Zamir

Dean
Louis Marshall Professor of Environmental Law
Room 232
Dean
02-5823845
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Professor Daphna Lewinsohn-Zamir is the Dean of the Faculty of law and Louis Marshall Professor of Environmental Law at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her fields of interest are property law and theory, economic and behavioral analysis of law, law and normative ethics, and empirical legal studies.

Prof. Lewinsohn-Zamir has clerked for Justice Dov Levin of the Israeli Supreme Court and in the Department of Constitutional and Administrative Law at the Ministry of Justice. She has received numerous awards and prizes, including the Hebrew University President’s Prize for Excellent Young Scholar (named after Yoram Ben Porat), the Fulbright Scholarship, the Rothschild Fellowship and the Zeltner Prize for Senior Scholar. She has been a Visiting Researcher at Harvard Law School, a Visiting Scholar at Yale Law School, and a Visiting Professor at the University of Chicago Law School, NYU Law School, Georgetown Law School, and the Center for Transnational Legal Studies (CTLS), London.

Prof. Lewinsohn-Zamir’s research was published in journals such as the Yale Law Journal, NYU Law Review, Texas Law Review, Cornell Law Review, Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, University of Toronto Law Journal, Law & Social Inquiry and Minnesota Law Review. Her latest book, “The Psychology of Property Law” (co-authored with Stephanie Stern), was published by the NYU Press.

 

Education

1986 – LL.B., cum laude, Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
1994 – LL.D. (Doctor of Law), summa cum laude, Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 

Representative Publications

The 'Conservation Game': The Possibility of Voluntary Cooperation in Preserving Buildings of Cultural Importance, 20 Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy 733-789 (1997);

Consumer Preferences, Citizen Preferences, and the Provision of Public Goods, 108 Yale Law Journal 377-406 (1998);

The Choice Between Property Rules and Liability Rules Revisited: Critical Observations from Behavioral Studies, 80 Texas Law Review 219-260 (2001);

The Objectivity of Well-Being and the Objectives of Property Law, 78 New York University Law Review 1669-1754 (2003);

In Defense of Redistribution Through Private Law, 91 Minnesota Law Review 326-397 (2006);

Identifying Intense Preferences, 94 Cornell Law Review 1391-1458 (2009);

Can't Buy Me Love: Monetary versus In-Kind Remedies, 2013 University of Illinois Law Review 151-194; 

Do the Right Thing: Indirect Remedies in Private Law, 94 Boston University Law Review 55-103 (2014);

The Importance of Being Earnest: Two Notions of Internalization, 65 University of Toronto Law Journal 37-84 (2015);

Law and Identifiability, 92 Indiana Law Journal 505-555 (2017); (with Ilana Ritov & Tehila Kogut).

What’s in a Name? The Disparate Effects of Identifiability on Offenders and Victims of Sexual Harassment, 16 Journal of Empirical Legal Studies 955-1000 (2019) (with Netta Barak-Corren).

 

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Neta Barak Corren

Prof. Netta Barak-Corren

Director, Center for the Study of Multiculturalism and Diversity
Member, Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality
Room 210
02-5882562
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Prof. Netta Barak-Corren is a legal scholar and cognitive scientist, focusing on empirical and behavioral analysis of constitutional and public law, with a particular interest in conflicts of rights and the interaction between law and religion and law and social norms. 

Barak-Corren received her first degrees in Law in Cognitive Science from the Hebrew University (Valedictorian and three-time recipient of the Albert Einstein and Rector awards). She then clerked for the Chief Justice of the Israeli Supreme Court, Hon. Dorit Beinish, and pursued doctoral studies at Harvard, graduating in 2016.

Currently, Barak-Corren is a Professor of Law at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Academic Director of the Center for the Study of Multiculturalism and Diversity at the Hebrew University. She is also an elected member of the Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. During 2020-2022 she is also a Nootbaar Religious Freedom Fellow at Pepperdine University School of Law. 

For more information on Barak-Corren's publications, public writing, research awards, and research grants, see here.

 

Education

S.J.D. Harvard Law School 2016

LL.M. Harvard Law School 2013

LL.B. and B.A. in Law and Cognitive Science, Hebrew University of Jerusalem 2012

 

Representative Publications

Netta Barak-Corren, Religious Exemptions Increase Discrimination Towards Same-sex Couples: Evidence from Masterpiece Cakeshop, Journal of Legal Studies (2021)

Netta Barak-Corren, Regulating for Social Integration by Behavioral Design: An Evidence-Based Approach for Culturally Responsive Regulation, Regulation and Governance (2021)

Netta Barak-Corren, Taking Conflicting Rights Seriously, 65(2) Villanova Law Review 295 (2020)

Netta Barak-Corren & Daphna Lewinsohn-Zamir, What’s in a name? The asymmetric effects of identifiability on offenders and victims of sexual harassment. 16(4) Journal of Empirical Legal Studies 955 (2019)

Netta Barak-Corren, Reexamining the evidence on Ultra-Orthodox attitudes and gender separation in academia. 49 Mishpatim—Hebrew U. Law Review (2019) [in Hebrew].

Netta Barak-Corren, Yuval Feldman, and Noam Gidron, The Provocative Effect of Law: Majority Nationalism and Minority Discrimination, 15(4) Journal of Empirical Legal Studies (2018). 

Netta Barak-Corren, Beyond dissent and compliance: Religious decision-makers and secular law, 6(2) Oxford Journal of Law and Religion 293-322 (2017).

Netta Barak-Corren, Does Antidiscrimination Law Influence Religious Behavior? An Empirical Examination, 67(4) Hastings Law Journal 957 (2016).

 

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Prof. Israel Gilad

Prof. Israel Gilead

Bora Laskin Chair of Law
02-5882526

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Fields of Interest:

Tort Law, corporations, limitation of civil actions, economic analysis of tort law, bills and notes

Main:

Israel Gilead completed his doctorate studies in law, together with undergraduate studies in economics, at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. In 1984 he joined the Faculty of Law, heading the Bora Laskin Chair. In the year 1999-2002 Prof. Gilad served as dean of the Faculty of Law. He was a member of international bodies involved in the study of the laws of damages and insurance, and served as a member of numerous professional committees, including the Obsolescence Committee, the Damages Committee, and the Codification Committee, in which capacity he helped draft key provisions in the damages, remedies, and obsolescence sections in the Proposed Law: Rules of Alimony, 5771-2011.Gilad’s areas of expertise are damages law, civil obsolescence, forms of payment, the economic analysis of law, and corporate law. 

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Yehonatan Givati

Prof. Yehonatan Givati

Sylvan M. Cohen Chair in Law
Room 214
02-5882509
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Professor Yehonatan Givati is the Sylvan M. Cohen professor at Hebrew University Law School. He is a member of Hebrew University's Center for the Study of Rationality.

His scholarly interest lies in the area of economic analysis of law. His work is both theoretical and empirical. He applies the tools of law and economics to three main areas of law: tax law, law enforcement, and administrative law and regulation. He has also published in the areas of private law and judicial behaviour. He received a PHD from the Economics Department at Harvard University in 2013, and an SJD from Harvard Law School in 2011.

 

Education

Harvard University, Ph.D. (Economics), 2013

Harvard University, M.A. (Economics), 2011

Harvard Law School, S.J.D. (Doctorate in Law), 2011

Harvard Law School, LL.M. (Master of Laws) studies, 2007

Hebrew University, M.A. (Economics), 2005

Hebrew University, LL.B. (Law and Economics), 2002 

 

Representative Publications

Harm Displacement and Tort Doctrine (with Yotam Kaplan), Journal of Legal Studies 49: 73-101 (2020)

How would Judges Compose Judicial Panels? Theory and Evidence from the Supreme Court of Israel (with Israel Rosenberg), Journal of Empirical Legal Studies 17: 317-341 (2020)

Theories of Tax Deductions: Income Measurement versus Efficiency, Journal of Law, Finance, and Accounting 5: 107-136 (2020) 

Preferences for Criminal Justice Error Types: Theory and Evidence,  Journal of Legal Studies 48: 307-339 (2019)

The Regulation of Language, Journal of Law & Economics 61: 397-425 (2018)

The Economics of Rights: Does the Right to Counsel Increase Crime? (with Itai Ater and Oren Rigbi), American Economic Journal: Economic Policy 9(2): 1-27 (2017)

A Theory of Whistleblower Rewards, Journal of Legal Studies 45: 43-72 (2016)

Googling a Free Lunch: The Taxation of Fringe Benefits, Tax Law Review 69: 275-309 (2016)

Organizational Structure, Police Activity and Crime (with Itai Ater and Oren Rigbi), Journal of Public Economics 115: 62-71 (2014)

Game Theory and the Structure of Administrative Law, University of Chicago Law Review 81: 481-518 (2014)

Legal Institutions and Social Values: Theory and Evidence from Plea Bargaining Regimes, Journal of Empirical Legal Studies 11: 867–893 (2014)

Law, Economics, and Culture: Theory of Mandated Benefits and Evidence from Maternity Leave Policies (with Ugo Troiano), Journal of Law & Economics 55: 339-364 (2012)

Resolving Legal Uncertainty: The Unfulfilled Promise of Advance Tax Rulings, Virginia Tax Review 29: 137-175 (2009)

 

CV and List of Publications

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Ehud Guttel

Prof. Ehud Guttel

Bora Laskin Chair in Law
Room 129
02-5882506
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Ehud Guttel is the Bora Laskin Professor of Law, and a member of the Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality. He specializes in tort law, law and economics, and criminal law. Professor Guttel is a graduate of Hebrew University and Yale Law School, and the recipient of several awards for excellence in research and teaching. He is also the founder (together with Yehonatan Givati) of the Aumann-Fischer Center for Law, Economics and Public Policy (to open in 2022).

 

Education

LL.B, Hebrew University, 1997
 
LL.M, Yale University, 1999
 
J.S.D, Yale University, 2002

  

Representative publications

"Sequencing in Damages” (with E. Cheng and Y. Procaccia), 74 Stanford Law Review (forthcoming, 2022). 

“Shared Liability and Excessive Care” (with Y. Procaccia & E. Winter), Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization (2021).

“Tort Liability and the Risk of Discriminatory Government” (with A. Porat), 87 University of Chicago Law Review 1 (2020).

"Bargaining around Cost-Benefit Standards" (with S. Leshem), 103 Journal of Public Economics 55 (2013).

"Buying the Right to Harm" (with S. Leshem), 86 S. California Law Review 1195 (2013).

"Negligence, Strict Liability and Collective Action" (wth D. Gilo & E. Yuval), 42 Journal of Legal Studies 69-82 (2013).

"Criminal Sanctions in the Defense of the Innocent" (with D. Teichman) 110 Michigan Law Review 597 (2012).

"Negligence and Insufficient Activity: The Missing Paradigm in Torts" (with D. Gilo) 108 Michigan Law Review 277 (2009).

"The (Hidden) Risk of Opportunistic Precautions” 93 Virginia Law Review 1389 (2007).

"Overcorrection" 93 Georgetown Law Journal 241 (2004).

 

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Alon Harel

Prof. Alon Harel

Phillip and Estelle Mizock Chair in Administrative and Criminal Law
Room 221
02-5882582
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Alon Harel is Mizock Professor of Law and a member of Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality. Professor Harel works in several fields: moral and political philosophy, criminal law theory, constitutional law theory and also law and economics and behavioral law and economics. 

His book Why Law Matters (OUP, 2014) challenges the view that law is merely an instrument designed to render the right or correct in decisions. It maintains that often legal institutions and legal procedures matter as such. For instance, it is argued in chapter 3 of this book that there are certain decisions, eg, the infliction of punishment for crimes that must be made by public rather than private institutions. It also defends the intrinsic value of constitutional directives and of judicial review. 

More recently, Professor Harel has investigated in a series of papers the vices of privatization. In his edited book Companion on Privatization (CUP, 2021), Professor Harel discusses critically the different justifications provided for privatization and, in particular, stresses the distinct role of the state as an institution which represents citizens and acts on their behalf.

Professor Harel works currently on a book on the authority of the state where he argues that ultimately the state’s authority is grounded in its ability to speak in the name of all. This explains why political authority is necessarily public; it represents those who are subject to it and, consequently, those who are subject to it are, in principle, accountable for the authority’ decisions.

 

Education

LL.B., Hebrew University, (1983) (with distinction).
LL.M., Hebrew University (1985) (with distinction). 
D. Phil. (Philosophy of Law) (1988) (Balliol College, Oxford). 

 

Representative Publications:

  1. Alon Harel, Why Law Matters (Oxford University Press, 2014).
    Reviews:
    a. The Washington Post, Book Review: ‘Why Law Matters’ by Alon Harel, By Will Baude November 6, 2014.
    b. Book  Review:  Why  Law Matters  By  Alon  Harel, Mark  Coombes.
    c. Book Review Debate: Zucca and Harel 15 International Journal of Constitutional Law 301-318 (2015)
    d. Arie Rosen, Book Review 34 Law and Philosophy 699-708 (2015)
    e. Barbara Levenbook, Book Review Notre Dame Philosophical Review 6/10/2015 
    f. Rutgers Symposium on WHY LAW MATTERS Comments by Malcolm Thorburn, Ekow Yankaw, Leo Zaibert, Guyora Binder, Kyron Huigens with a response by Alon Harel 2 Critical Analysis of Law (2015)
    g. Michel Paradis Dignity Under Law New Rambler Review16/12/2015
    h. Yossi Nehushtan, The Case for Modest Constitutional Instrumentalism 30 Constitutional Commentary 639-666 (215)
    i. Jacob Weinrib, Book Review: Why Law Matters 29 Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 267-270 (2016).
    j. Leonard Kahn, Book Review 126 Ethics 831-836 (2016). 

     

  2. Alon Harel, Against Privatization as Such (forthcoming in Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 2016) (with Avihay Dorfman).

  3. Alon Harel, The Duty to Criminalize 34 Law and Philosophy 1-22 (2015). 

  4. Alon Harel, Necessity Knows No Law (forthcomingToronto University L.J., 2011) (with Assaf Sharon).

  5. Alon Harel, Commensurability and Agency: Yet Two Unmet Challenges to Law and Economics 96 Cornell L. Rev. 749-788 (2011) (with Ariel Porat).

  6. Alon Harel, The Easy Core Case for Judicial Review  2Journal of Legal Analysis 227-256  (with Tsvi Kahana).

  7. Alon Harel, Criminal Responsibility for Unspecified Offences 94 Minnesota L. Rev. 261-310 (2009) (with Ariel Porat)

  8. Alon Harel, Uncertainty Revisited: Legal Prediction and Legal Postdiction 107 Michigan L. Rev. 467-499 (2008) (with Ehud Guttel).

  9. Alon Harel, Why Only the State May Inflict Criminal Sanctions: The Case Against Privately Inflicted Sanctions14 Legal Theory 113-133 (2008).

  10. Alon Harel, The Economics of Stigma: Why More Detection of Crime May Result in Less Stigmatization 36Journal of Legal Studies 355-377 (2007) (with Alon Klement).

  11. Alon Harel, The Right to Judicial Review 92 Virginia L. Rev. 991-1022 (2006) (with Yuval Eylon).

  12. Alon Harel, Matching Probabilities: The Behavioral Law & Economics of Repeated Behavior 72 University of Chicago L. Rev., 1197-2005 (2005) (with Ehud Guttel).

  13. Alon Harel, Theories of Rights in Blackwell’s Guide to the Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory,191-206(eds. Martin P. Golding & William Edmundson, 2005).

  14. Alon Harel, The Virtues of Uncertainty in Law: An Experimental Approach 89 Iowa L. Rev. 443-494 (2004) (with Tom Baker and Tamar Kugler).

  15. Alon Harel, Theories of Rights in Blackwell’s Guide to the Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory,191-206(eds. Martin P. Golding & William Edmundson, 2005).

  16. Alon Harel, The Virtues of Uncertainty in Law: An Experimental Approach 89 Iowa L. Rev. 443-494 (2004) (with Tom Baker and Tamar Kugler).

 

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Dr. Adi Leibovitch

Dr. Adi Leibovitch

Senior Lecturer
Room 223
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Dr. Adi Leibovitch is a Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Law and a member of the Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality. She served as a visiting professor at the University of Virginia School of Law, and as a visiting researcher at NYU School of Law, the University of Michigan Law School, and UCLA School of Law. 

Leibovitch's research focuses on the economic analysis of law, behavioral theory, and empirical methods, as applied to the study of the institutional design of courts, litigation, and legal decision-making, with a particular interest in the criminal justice system. She has published articles in leading peer review and law review journals, including the Journal of Legal StudiesNorthwestern University Law Review, and University of Chicago Law Review Online. Her research has received several awards and grants, including a research grant from the Israel Science Foundation, and the Russell Sage Foundation Presidential Award.  

Before starting to teach, Leibovitch was an Academic Fellow at Columbia Law School. She received her LL.M. and J.S.D from the University of Chicago Law School, where she was a John M. Olin Scholar at the Coase-Sandor Institute for Law and Economics, and a Russell Baker Scholar. She also earned her LL.B. and M.B.A, both magna cum laude, from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and her M.A. summa cum laude in public policy, mediation and conflict resolution from Tel-Aviv University. Leibovitch practiced law at the Military Advocate General Corps in Israel Defense Forces, where she served as legal counsel in the International Law Department, a prosecutor and deputy head of the Intelligence and Narcotics Section in the Chief Military Prosecutor's Office, and a public defender in the Office of the Military Public Defender for the Central District.

 

Education

J.S.D., University of Chicago Law School, 2016.
LL.M., University of Chicago Law School, 2011.
M.A., Tel-Aviv University, School of Public Policy, 2009.
M.B.A., Hebrew University, School of Business Administration, 2007.
LL.B., Hebrew University, Faculty of Law, 2005.

 

Representative Publications

Leibovitch, Adi, Institutional Design and the Psychology of the Trial Judge, in Bartosz Brozek, Jaap Hage, and Nicole A. Vincent (Eds.), Law and Mind: A Survey of Law and the Cognitive Sciences, pp. 193–206 (Cambridge University Press) (2021)

Leibovitch, Adi, and Alexander Stremitzer, Experimental Methods in Constitutional LawUniversity of Chicago Law Review Online (2021)

Leibovitch, Adi, Punishing on a Curve, 111(5) Northwestern University Law Review 1205 (2017).

Leibovitch, Adi, Relative Judgments, 45(2) Journal of Legal Studies 281 (2016).

 

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Prof. Barak Medina

Prof. Barak Medina

Justice Haim H. Cohn Chair in Human Rights Law
053-2291828

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Professor Barak Medina holds the Justice Haim Cohen Chair in Human Rights at the faculty of law of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He has served as Dean of the Law Faculty (2009-2012), and since October 2017 he serves as the Rector (Provost) of the Hebrew University. He is a graduate of Tel-Aviv University (LLB, BA and MA in economics), Harvard Law School (LLM), and the Hebrew University (PhD in economics), and served as a Visiting Professor at the Law Schools of Columbia University in New-York and University of California Berkeley.

Professor Medina’s research interests include constitutional law, and economic analysis of law. His scholarship includes research on theoretical, comparative and positive aspects of the right to equality, freedom of speech, judicial review, constitutionalism, and more. Professor Medina authored seven books. Among his books: the latest editions of the most authoritative book on Israeli constitutional law (with Amnon Rubinstein), and a book titled Law, Economics, and Morality (with Eyal Zamir), on incorporating deontological threshold to economic analysis of law. His most recent book is a 1,000-page volume on Human Rights Law in Israel. His latest article (published at TAU Law Review) discusses the question, does Israel have a Constitution?

 

Education

1991 Tel-Aviv University Law LL.B. (Cum Laude) 

1991 Tel-Aviv University Economics B.A. (Cum Laude) 

1992 Tel-Aviv University Economics M.A. (Cum Laude) (supervisor: Alex Cukierman)

1996 Harvard University Law LL.M. (supervisor: Louis Kaplow)

1999 Hebrew University Economics Ph.D. (supervisor: Joram Mayshar and Uriel Procaccia)

 

Representative publications

Amnon Rubinstein and Barak Medina, THE CONSTITUTIONAL LAW OF THE STATE OF ISRAEL: INSTITUTIONS (6th edition, 2005) [Hebrew]

Eyal Zamir and Barak Medina, LAW, ECONOMICS, AND MORALITY (Oxford University Press, 2010) 

Barak Medina, HUMAN RIGHTS LAW IN ISRAEL (2016) [Hebrew]

Barak Medina, Economic Analysis of Public Law, in LAW AND ECONOMICS (Uriel Procaccia ed., Sacher Institute, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 2012). [Hebrew]

 

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Doron Teichman

Prof. Doron Teichman

Jacob I. Berman Chair in Law
Room 215
02-5882530
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Prof. Doron Teichman is the Jacob I. Berman Professor of Law at the Faculty of Law of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and the former president of the Israeli Law and Economics Association. Prof. Teichman’s research interests include economic and behavioral analysis of law, empirical legal studies, and criminal law. He authored numerous articles in these areas, which were published in leading journals such as Michigan Law Review, NYU Law Review, Georgetown Law Journal, Northwestern University Law Review, Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, and Law and Society Review. His latest book, Behavioral Law and Economics (with Eyal Zamir, 2018), was published by Oxford University Press.

Prof. Teichman has been awarded numerous fellowships and prizes. Some of these include: the Fulbright Fellowship (2001–2003); the Olin Fellowship at the University of Michigan (2001–2003), The Inaugural Post Graduate Fellowship at The Center for Law Business and Economics at The University of Texas Law School (2005); and the Heshin Award for Excellence in Legal Research (2013). Prof. Teichman has also won numerous competitive research grants. He received two personal grants from the Israel Science Foundation (2012–2014; 2020–2023) and was a founding member of the Center for Empirical Studies of Decision-Making and the Law funded by the I-Core program. 

Professor Teichman has served as a visiting professor at several leading law schools such as: Columbia University, University of Zürich, Tulane University and the Center for Transnational Legal Studies, London. He has also presented his work in numerous conferences and workshops, including the annual meetings of the American Law and Economics Association, the Society for Empirical Legal Studies, and the European Association of Law and Economics. 

 

Education

S.J.D. The University of Michigan, 2005. 

LL.M., The University of Michigan, 2002.

LL.B., Tel–Aviv University, 2000 (magna cum laude).

B.A. (economics), Tel–Aviv University, 2000 (magna cum laude).

 

Representative publications

Doron Teichman, The Market for Criminal Justice: Federalism, Crime Control, and Jurisdictional Competition, 103 Mich. L. Rev. 1831 (2005).

Doron Teichman, Are All Legal Probabilities Created Equal?, 84 NYU. L. Rev 840 (2009) (with Yuval Feldman).

Doron Teichman, Old Habits are Hard to Change: A Case Study of Israeli Real Estate Contracts, 44 L. & Soc. Rev. 299 (2010).

Doron Teichman, Criminal Sanctions in The Defense of the Innocent, 110 Mich. L. Rev. 597 (2012) (with Ehud Guttel).

Doron Teichman, Anchoring Legal Standards, 13 J. Emp. L. Stud. 298 (2016) (with Yuval Feldman and Amos Schurr).

 

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Prof. Eyal Zamir

Prof. Eyal Zamir

Augusto Levi Professor of Commercial Law
Room 120
02-5823845; 052-4510121
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Prof. Eyal Zamir is Augusto Levi Professor of Commercial Law at the Hebrew University, where he served as Dean of the Faculty of Law, and was the founding director of the Aharon Barak Center for Interdisciplinary Legal Studies and a founding member of the Center for Empirical Studies of Decision-Making and the Law. He was a visiting scholar or visiting professor at Harvard Law School, Yale Law School, NYU School of Law, University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School, Georgetown University Law Center, UCLA School of Law, University of Zürich, Max Planck Institute of Economics in Jena, and the Center for Transnational Legal Studies in London.

Prof. Zamir’s research interests include economic and behavioral analysis of law, empirical legal studies, contract law and theory, and normative ethics and law. He authored or edited 18 books and published 80 articles. His latest four books were published with Oxford University Press. His articles were published in journals such as the Columbia Law Review, University of Chicago Law ReviewJournal of Legal Studies, Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, California Law Review, Virginia Law Review, American Journal of International Law, American Journal of Comparative Law, University of Toronto Law Journal, Law & Social Inquiry, Organizational Behavior & Human Decision Processes, and Public Administration Review.

Prof. Zamir presented his work in numerous conferences and workshops, including the annual meetings of the American Law and Economics Association and the Society for Empirical Legal Studies.

Prof. Zamir has been awarded numerous fellowships and prizes, including the Fulbright Researcher Award; the Rothschild Fellowship; the Hebrew University President’s Prize for Excellent Young Scholar named after Y. Ben Porat (first recipient); the Zeltner Prize for Senior Scholar; and the Justice Shneor Zalman Cheshin Prize for Academic Excellence in Law for Senior Scholar.

 

Education

1982 - LL.B. cum laude, Law Faculty, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel;

1989 - Dr. Jr., Law Faculty, Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
 

Representative publications

Law, Economics, and Morality 376 pp. (OUP, 2010, with Barak Medina); 
Chinese translation by Xu Dafeng (Fu Dan University Press, Shanghai China, 2015);

The Oxford Handbook of Behavioral Economics and the Law X+ 824 pp. (co-edited with Doron Teichman);

Law, Psychology, and Morality: The Role of Loss Aversion 258+18 pp. (OUP, 2014);

Behavioral Law and Economics XVII + 618 pp. (OUP, 2018, with Doron Teichman);

 “The Inverted Hierarchy of Contract Interpretation and Supplementation,” 97 Columbia L. Rev. 1710-803 (1997);

“The Efficiency of Paternalism,” 84 Virginia Law Review 229-86 (1998);

“The Missing Interest: Restoration of the Contractual Equivalence,” 93 Virginia Law Review 59-138 (2007);

“Law, Morality, and Economics: Integrating Moral Constraints with Economic Analysis of Law”, 96 California Law Review 323-91 (2008) (with Barak Medina);

“Revisiting the Debate over Attorneys’ Contingent Fees: A Behavioral Analysis,” 38 Journal of Legal Studies 245-88 (2010) (with I. Ritov);

“Loss Aversion, Omission Bias, and the Burden of Proof in Civil Litigation,” 41 Journal of Legal Studies 165-207 (2012) (with I. Ritov);

“Contract Law and Theory – Three Views of the Cathedral,” 81 University of Chicago Law Review 2077–2123 (2014);

“Affirmative Action and other Group Tradeoff Policies: Identifiability of the Adversely Affected People” 125 Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes 50-60 (2014) (with I. Ritov);

“Explaining Self-Interested Behavior of Public-Spirited Policymakers” Public Administration Review (2017) (with Raanan Sulitzeanu-Kenan);

“A Theory of Mandatory Rules: Typology, Policy, and Design” 99 Texas Law Review 283–340 (2020) (featuring Ian Ayres).

 

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