Prof. Daphna Lewinsohn-Zamir

Prof. Daphna Lewinsohn-Zamir
Dean
Louis Marshall Professor of Environmental Law
Room 232
02-5823845

Professor Daphna Lewinsohn-Zamir is the Dean of the Faculty of law and Louis Marshall Professor of Environmental Law at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her fields of interest are property law and theory, economic and behavioral analysis of law, law and normative ethics, and empirical legal studies.

Prof. Lewinsohn-Zamir has clerked for Justice Dov Levin of the Israeli Supreme Court and in the Department of Constitutional and Administrative Law at the Ministry of Justice. She has received numerous awards and prizes, including the Hebrew University President’s Prize for Excellent Young Scholar (named after Yoram Ben Porat), the Fulbright Scholarship, the Rothschild Fellowship and the Zeltner Prize for Senior Scholar. She has been a Visiting Researcher at Harvard Law School, a Visiting Scholar at Yale Law School, and a Visiting Professor at the University of Chicago Law School, NYU Law School, Georgetown Law School, and the Center for Transnational Legal Studies (CTLS), London.

Prof. Lewinsohn-Zamir’s research was published in journals such as the Yale Law Journal, NYU Law Review, Texas Law Review, Cornell Law Review, Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, University of Toronto Law Journal, Law & Social Inquiry and Minnesota Law Review. Her latest book, “The Psychology of Property Law” (co-authored with Stephanie Stern), was published by the NYU Press.

 

Education

1986 – LL.B., cum laude, Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
1994 – LL.D. (Doctor of Law), summa cum laude, Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 

Representative Publications

The 'Conservation Game': The Possibility of Voluntary Cooperation in Preserving Buildings of Cultural Importance, 20 Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy 733-789 (1997);

Consumer Preferences, Citizen Preferences, and the Provision of Public Goods, 108 Yale Law Journal 377-406 (1998);

The Choice Between Property Rules and Liability Rules Revisited: Critical Observations from Behavioral Studies, 80 Texas Law Review 219-260 (2001);

The Objectivity of Well-Being and the Objectives of Property Law, 78 New York University Law Review 1669-1754 (2003);

In Defense of Redistribution Through Private Law, 91 Minnesota Law Review 326-397 (2006);

Identifying Intense Preferences, 94 Cornell Law Review 1391-1458 (2009);

Can't Buy Me Love: Monetary versus In-Kind Remedies, 2013 University of Illinois Law Review 151-194; 

Do the Right Thing: Indirect Remedies in Private Law, 94 Boston University Law Review 55-103 (2014);

The Importance of Being Earnest: Two Notions of Internalization, 65 University of Toronto Law Journal 37-84 (2015);

Law and Identifiability, 92 Indiana Law Journal 505-555 (2017); (with Ilana Ritov & Tehila Kogut).

What’s in a Name? The Disparate Effects of Identifiability on Offenders and Victims of Sexual Harassment, 16 Journal of Empirical Legal Studies 955-1000 (2019) (with Netta Barak-Corren).