Law and Behavioral Economics

daphna-lewinsohn-zamir

Prof. Daphna Lewinsohn-Zamir

Dean
Louis Marshall Professor of Environmental Law
Room 232
02-5823845
Dean
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Professor Daphna Lewinsohn-Zamir is the Dean of the Faculty of law and Louis Marshall Professor of Environmental Law at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her fields of interest are property law and theory, economic and behavioral analysis of law, law and normative ethics, and empirical legal studies.

Prof. Lewinsohn-Zamir has clerked for Justice Dov Levin of the Israeli Supreme Court and in the Department of Constitutional and Administrative Law at the Ministry of Justice. She has received numerous awards and prizes, including the Hebrew University President’s Prize for Excellent Young Scholar (named after Yoram Ben Porat), the Fulbright Scholarship, the Rothschild Fellowship and the Zeltner Prize for Senior Scholar. She has been a Visiting Researcher at Harvard Law School, a Visiting Scholar at Yale Law School, and a Visiting Professor at the University of Chicago Law School, NYU Law School, Georgetown Law School, and the Center for Transnational Legal Studies (CTLS), London.

Prof. Lewinsohn-Zamir’s research was published in journals such as the Yale Law Journal, NYU Law Review, Texas Law Review, Cornell Law Review, Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, University of Toronto Law Journal, Law & Social Inquiry and Minnesota Law Review. Her latest book, “The Psychology of Property Law” (co-authored with Stephanie Stern), was published by the NYU Press.

 

Education

1986 – LL.B., cum laude, Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
1994 – LL.D. (Doctor of Law), summa cum laude, Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 

Representative Publications

The 'Conservation Game': The Possibility of Voluntary Cooperation in Preserving Buildings of Cultural Importance, 20 Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy 733-789 (1997);

Consumer Preferences, Citizen Preferences, and the Provision of Public Goods, 108 Yale Law Journal 377-406 (1998);

The Choice Between Property Rules and Liability Rules Revisited: Critical Observations from Behavioral Studies, 80 Texas Law Review 219-260 (2001);

The Objectivity of Well-Being and the Objectives of Property Law, 78 New York University Law Review 1669-1754 (2003);

In Defense of Redistribution Through Private Law, 91 Minnesota Law Review 326-397 (2006);

Identifying Intense Preferences, 94 Cornell Law Review 1391-1458 (2009);

Can't Buy Me Love: Monetary versus In-Kind Remedies, 2013 University of Illinois Law Review 151-194; 

Do the Right Thing: Indirect Remedies in Private Law, 94 Boston University Law Review 55-103 (2014);

The Importance of Being Earnest: Two Notions of Internalization, 65 University of Toronto Law Journal 37-84 (2015);

Law and Identifiability, 92 Indiana Law Journal 505-555 (2017); (with Ilana Ritov & Tehila Kogut).

What’s in a Name? The Disparate Effects of Identifiability on Offenders and Victims of Sexual Harassment, 16 Journal of Empirical Legal Studies 955-1000 (2019) (with Netta Barak-Corren).

 

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Neta Barak Corren

Prof. Netta Barak-Corren

Director, Center for the Study of Multiculturalism and Diversity
Member, Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality
Room 210
02-5882562
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Prof. Netta Barak-Corren is a legal scholar and cognitive scientist, focusing on empirical and behavioral analysis of constitutional and public law, with a particular interest in conflicts of rights and the interaction between law and religion and law and social norms. 

Barak-Corren received her first degrees in Law in Cognitive Science from the Hebrew University (Valedictorian and three-time recipient of the Albert Einstein and Rector awards). She then clerked for the Chief Justice of the Israeli Supreme Court, Hon. Dorit Beinish, and pursued doctoral studies at Harvard, graduating in 2016.

Currently, Barak-Corren is a Professor of Law at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Academic Director of the Center for the Study of Multiculturalism and Diversity at the Hebrew University. She is also an elected member of the Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. During 2020-2022 she is also a Nootbaar Religious Freedom Fellow at Pepperdine University School of Law. 

For more information on Barak-Corren's publications, public writing, research awards, and research grants, see here.

 

Education

S.J.D. Harvard Law School 2016

LL.M. Harvard Law School 2013

LL.B. and B.A. in Law and Cognitive Science, Hebrew University of Jerusalem 2012

 

Representative Publications

Netta Barak-Corren, Religious Exemptions Increase Discrimination Towards Same-sex Couples: Evidence from Masterpiece Cakeshop, Journal of Legal Studies (2021)

Netta Barak-Corren, Regulating for Social Integration by Behavioral Design: An Evidence-Based Approach for Culturally Responsive Regulation, Regulation and Governance (2021)

Netta Barak-Corren, Taking Conflicting Rights Seriously, 65(2) Villanova Law Review 295 (2020)

Netta Barak-Corren & Daphna Lewinsohn-Zamir, What’s in a name? The asymmetric effects of identifiability on offenders and victims of sexual harassment. 16(4) Journal of Empirical Legal Studies 955 (2019)

Netta Barak-Corren, Reexamining the evidence on Ultra-Orthodox attitudes and gender separation in academia. 49 Mishpatim—Hebrew U. Law Review (2019) [in Hebrew].

Netta Barak-Corren, Yuval Feldman, and Noam Gidron, The Provocative Effect of Law: Majority Nationalism and Minority Discrimination, 15(4) Journal of Empirical Legal Studies (2018). 

Netta Barak-Corren, Beyond dissent and compliance: Religious decision-makers and secular law, 6(2) Oxford Journal of Law and Religion 293-322 (2017).

Netta Barak-Corren, Does Antidiscrimination Law Influence Religious Behavior? An Empirical Examination, 67(4) Hastings Law Journal 957 (2016).

 

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Prof. Eyal Zamir

Prof. Eyal Zamir

Augusto Levi Professor of Commercial Law
Room 120
02-5823845; 052-4510121
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Prof. Eyal Zamir is Augusto Levi Professor of Commercial Law at the Hebrew University, where he served as Dean of the Faculty of Law, and was the founding director of the Aharon Barak Center for Interdisciplinary Legal Studies and a founding member of the Center for Empirical Studies of Decision-Making and the Law. He was a visiting scholar or visiting professor at Harvard Law School, Yale Law School, NYU School of Law, University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School, Georgetown University Law Center, UCLA School of Law, University of Zürich, Max Planck Institute of Economics in Jena, and the Center for Transnational Legal Studies in London.

Prof. Zamir’s research interests include economic and behavioral analysis of law, empirical legal studies, contract law and theory, and normative ethics and law. He authored or edited 18 books and published 80 articles. His latest four books were published with Oxford University Press. His articles were published in journals such as the Columbia Law Review, University of Chicago Law ReviewJournal of Legal Studies, Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, California Law Review, Virginia Law Review, American Journal of International Law, American Journal of Comparative Law, University of Toronto Law Journal, Law & Social Inquiry, Organizational Behavior & Human Decision Processes, and Public Administration Review.

Prof. Zamir presented his work in numerous conferences and workshops, including the annual meetings of the American Law and Economics Association and the Society for Empirical Legal Studies.

Prof. Zamir has been awarded numerous fellowships and prizes, including the Fulbright Researcher Award; the Rothschild Fellowship; the Hebrew University President’s Prize for Excellent Young Scholar named after Y. Ben Porat (first recipient); the Zeltner Prize for Senior Scholar; and the Justice Shneor Zalman Cheshin Prize for Academic Excellence in Law for Senior Scholar.

 

Education

1982 - LL.B. cum laude, Law Faculty, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel;

1989 - Dr. Jr., Law Faculty, Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
 

Representative publications

Law, Economics, and Morality 376 pp. (OUP, 2010, with Barak Medina); 
Chinese translation by Xu Dafeng (Fu Dan University Press, Shanghai China, 2015);

The Oxford Handbook of Behavioral Economics and the Law X+ 824 pp. (co-edited with Doron Teichman);

Law, Psychology, and Morality: The Role of Loss Aversion 258+18 pp. (OUP, 2014);

Behavioral Law and Economics XVII + 618 pp. (OUP, 2018, with Doron Teichman);

 “The Inverted Hierarchy of Contract Interpretation and Supplementation,” 97 Columbia L. Rev. 1710-803 (1997);

“The Efficiency of Paternalism,” 84 Virginia Law Review 229-86 (1998);

“The Missing Interest: Restoration of the Contractual Equivalence,” 93 Virginia Law Review 59-138 (2007);

“Law, Morality, and Economics: Integrating Moral Constraints with Economic Analysis of Law”, 96 California Law Review 323-91 (2008) (with Barak Medina);

“Revisiting the Debate over Attorneys’ Contingent Fees: A Behavioral Analysis,” 38 Journal of Legal Studies 245-88 (2010) (with I. Ritov);

“Loss Aversion, Omission Bias, and the Burden of Proof in Civil Litigation,” 41 Journal of Legal Studies 165-207 (2012) (with I. Ritov);

“Contract Law and Theory – Three Views of the Cathedral,” 81 University of Chicago Law Review 2077–2123 (2014);

“Affirmative Action and other Group Tradeoff Policies: Identifiability of the Adversely Affected People” 125 Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes 50-60 (2014) (with I. Ritov);

“Explaining Self-Interested Behavior of Public-Spirited Policymakers” Public Administration Review (2017) (with Raanan Sulitzeanu-Kenan);

“A Theory of Mandatory Rules: Typology, Policy, and Design” 99 Texas Law Review 283–340 (2020) (featuring Ian Ayres).

 

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