Law and Society

Keren W

Prof. Keren Weinshall (Margel)

Vice Dean
Member of The Israeli Young Academy of Arts and Sciences
Edward S. Silver Chair in Civil Procedure
Room 227
02-5882568
Vice Dean

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Education
Ph.D., 2012
Political Science Department, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Harvard Law School, Harvard University Visiting Researcher, 2009-2010
 
 M.A., 2007 (valedictorian),
Political Science Department, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem 
Ranked 1st in the P.S. Department and in the top 1% of Social Sciences' Faculty
Rector's list, 2007 
 
LL.B. (magna cum laude), 2003 
Faculty of Law, Tel Aviv University
Dean's List, 2002 
 
B.A. (magna cum laude) As part of a double major program, 2003
Political Science Department, Tel Aviv University
"Rector's List, 2002".

 

Representative publications

Lee Epstein, Gunnar Grendstad, Urˇska Sadl & Keren Weinshall  (Eds), The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Judicial Behaviour, Oxford University Press, under contract for 2023 publication.

Elena Kantorowicz-Reznichenko, Jaroslaw Kantorowicz & Keren Weinshall, Ideological Bias in Constitutional Judgments: Experimental Analysis and Potential Solutions. 19 Journal of Empirical Legal Studies (forthcoming 2022).

Christoph Engel & Keren Weinshall, Diffusion of Legal Innovations, 18 Annual Review of Law and Social Science (forthcoming 2022).

Lee Epstein, Urška Šadl & Keren Weinshall, The Role of Comparative Law in the Analysis of Judicial Behavior, American Journal of Comparative Law (forthcoming 2022).

Lee Epstein & Keren Weinshall, The Strategic Analysis of Judicial Behavior: A Comparative Perspective (monograph in Cambridge Elements in Law, Economics, and Politics), Cambridge University Press, (2021). 

Christoph Engel & Keren Weinshall, Manna from Heaven for Judges: Judges’ Reaction to a Quasi-Random Reduction in Caseload, 17 Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, 722-751 (2020).

Keren Weinshall & Lee Epstein, Developing 'Big Data' Infrastructure for Legal Analytics: Introducing the Israeli Supreme Court Database, 17 Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, 416-434 (2020).

Keren Weinshall, Udi Sommer & Ya’acov Ritov, Ideological Influences on Governance and Regulation: The Comparative Case of Supreme Courts, 12 Regulation & Governance, 315-427 (2018).

Christoph Engel, Alon Klement & Keren Weinshall, The Diffusion of Legal Innovations: A Case Study of Class Actions, 15 Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, 708-731 (2018).

Keren Weinshall-Margel & Inbal Galon, Cause and Effect in Sentencing, 37 Tel Aviv University Law Review (Iyunei Mishpat), 221-269 (2016).

Keren Weinshall-Margel, Inbal Galon & Ifat Taraboulos, Creating a Case Weight Index for Measuring Judicial Workload, 44 Hebrew University Law Review (Mishpatim), 769-814 (2015).

Keren Weinshall-Margel, Attitudinal and Neo-Institutional Models of Supreme Court Decision Making: An Empirical and Comparative Perspective from Israel, 8 Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, 556-586 (2011).

 [Received the first place award in the Best Paper Competition of the Rabin International Annual Graduate Conference]

Keren Weinshall-Margel & John Shapard, Overlooked Factors in the Analysis of Parole Decisions, 108 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 833-834 (2011)

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Neta Barak Corren

Prof. Netta Barak-Corren

Director, Center for the Study of Multiculturalism and Diversity
Member, Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality
Room 210
02-5882562
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Prof. Netta Barak-Corren is a legal scholar and cognitive scientist, focusing on empirical and behavioral analysis of constitutional and public law, with a particular interest in conflicts of rights and the interaction between law and religion and law and social norms. 

Barak-Corren received her first degrees in Law in Cognitive Science from the Hebrew University (Valedictorian and three-time recipient of the Albert Einstein and Rector awards). She then clerked for the Chief Justice of the Israeli Supreme Court, Hon. Dorit Beinish, and pursued doctoral studies at Harvard, graduating in 2016.

Currently, Barak-Corren is a Professor of Law at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Academic Director of the Center for the Study of Multiculturalism and Diversity at the Hebrew University. She is also an elected member of the Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. During 2020-2022 she is also a Nootbaar Religious Freedom Fellow at Pepperdine University School of Law. 

For more information on Barak-Corren's publications, public writing, research awards, and research grants, see here.

 

Education

S.J.D. Harvard Law School 2016

LL.M. Harvard Law School 2013

LL.B. and B.A. in Law and Cognitive Science, Hebrew University of Jerusalem 2012

 

Representative Publications

Netta Barak-Corren, Religious Exemptions Increase Discrimination Towards Same-sex Couples: Evidence from Masterpiece Cakeshop, Journal of Legal Studies (2021)

Netta Barak-Corren, Regulating for Social Integration by Behavioral Design: An Evidence-Based Approach for Culturally Responsive Regulation, Regulation and Governance (2021)

Netta Barak-Corren, Taking Conflicting Rights Seriously, 65(2) Villanova Law Review 295 (2020)

Netta Barak-Corren & Daphna Lewinsohn-Zamir, What’s in a name? The asymmetric effects of identifiability on offenders and victims of sexual harassment. 16(4) Journal of Empirical Legal Studies 955 (2019)

Netta Barak-Corren, Reexamining the evidence on Ultra-Orthodox attitudes and gender separation in academia. 49 Mishpatim—Hebrew U. Law Review (2019) [in Hebrew].

Netta Barak-Corren, Yuval Feldman, and Noam Gidron, The Provocative Effect of Law: Majority Nationalism and Minority Discrimination, 15(4) Journal of Empirical Legal Studies (2018). 

Netta Barak-Corren, Beyond dissent and compliance: Religious decision-makers and secular law, 6(2) Oxford Journal of Law and Religion 293-322 (2017).

Netta Barak-Corren, Does Antidiscrimination Law Influence Religious Behavior? An Empirical Examination, 67(4) Hastings Law Journal 957 (2016).

 

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Margit Cohn

Prof. Margit Cohn

Henry J. and Fannie Harkavy Chair in Comparative Law
Room 205
02-5882558

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Education

LLD, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (2001).

 

Representative publications
Margit Cohn, “Legal Transplants: A Theoretical Framework”, in Matthias Siems and Po Jen Yap (eds.), Cambridge Handbook of Comparative Law (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming 2022).
Margit Cohn, A Theory of the Executive Branch: Tension and Legality, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2021. 322 pages + indices.
Margit Cohn, “The Executive Branch / Core Government”, in Aharon Barak, Barak Medina, and Yaniv Roznai (eds.), The Oxford Handbook on the Israeli Constitution (Oxford University Press, forthcoming).
Margit Cohn, “Judicial Deference to the Administration in Israel”, in Zhu Guobin (ed.), Deference to the Administration in Judicial Review (Springer 2020) 231-269.
Margit Cohn, “Non-Statutory Executive Powers in France: A Comparison between Two Regimes”, in Comparative Law and… 51-63 (Presses universitaires d’Aix-Marseille, 2015).
Margit Cohn, “Sovereignty, Constitutional Dialogues and Political Networks”, in Sovereignty and the Law: Domestic, European and International Perspectives, 236-250 (Richard Rawlings, Peter Leyland & Alison Young, eds., Oxford University Press, 2013).
Margit Cohn and Dieter Grimm, Human Dignity”, in Routledge Handbook of Constitutional Law 193-203 (Thomas Fleiner, Cheryl Saunders & Mark Tushnet eds., Routledge, 2012).
Margit Cohn, “Form, Formula and Constitutional Ethos: The Political Question/Justiciability Doctrine in Three Common Law Systems”, 59 American Journal of Comparative Law 675-713 (2011).
Margit Cohn, “Legal Transplant Chronicles: The Evolution of Unreasonableness and Proportionality Review of the Administration in the United Kingdom”, 58 American Journal of Comparative Law 583-629 (2010).
Margit Cohn, “‘Patchwork’ Emergency Legislation”, 29 Mishpatim, 623-688 (1998) (in Hebrew).
     
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Roni Factor

Prof. Roni Factor

Associate Professor
Deputy Director of the Institute of Criminology
02-5882590

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Roni Factor is an Associate Professor at the Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His research brings an interdisciplinary perspective to the question of how the macro-level social context influences individuals’ antisocial and criminal behaviors. In studying these issues, he employs cutting-edge quantitative methods, using a variety of different types of data and research designs. His research so far has focused on three main areas. In the first, he studies how the macro social context and people’s position in society affects high-risk and criminal behavior, with a particular focus on traffic violations and road traffic crashes. In the second, he explores community–police relations and the legitimacy of law-enforcement institutions. In the third, he asks whether there is racial or ethnic bias in the work of law-enforcement institutions and develop new tools to measure it. 

 

Education

2000: B.A., summa cum laude, Department of Sociology and Anthropology and School of Education, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

2003: M.A., magna cum laude, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, specialization in Organizational Studies, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem  

2008: Ph.D., Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Transportation Research Institute, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology 

2011: Post-doctoral Research Fellowship, School of Public Health, Harvard University 

 

Representative publications

Factor, Roni, David Mahalel, Anat Rafaeli, and David R. Williams. 2013. A Social Resistance Perspective for Delinquent Behavior among Non-Dominant Minority Groups. The British Journal of Criminology 53 (5): 784-804

Factor, Roni. 2014. The Effect of Traffic Tickets on Road Traffic Crashes. Accident Analysis & Prevention 64, 86-91

Mehozay, Yoav, and Roni Factor. 2017. Deeply Embedded Core Normative Values and Legitimacy of Law-Enforcement Authorities. Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency 54(2): 151-180

Factor, Roni. 2019. A Quasi-Experiment Testing a Public Participation Process for Designing and Implementing an Enforcement Program among Minorities. Journal of Experimental Criminology 15:77-86

Factor, Roni, and Miriam Gur-Arye. (2020). Social Solidarity and Sentencing Disparities between Ethnic Groups: The Case of Hit-And-Run Traffic Offenses. Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, 17:164-185.

Factor, Roni., Gal Kaplan-Harel, Rivka Turgeman, and Simon Perry. 2021. Overcoming the Benchmark Problem in Estimating Bias in Traffic Enforcement: The Use of Automatic Traffic Enforcement Cameras. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 17:217-237.

 

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Prof. Ruth Gavison

Prof. Ruth Gavison

Professor Emerita of Human Rights

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Ruth Gavison was born in Jerusalem in 1945. She completed her bachelor’s degree in law cum laude from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. After interning at the Supreme Court with Justice Benjamin Halevy, she received her license to practice law and began to study for a master’s degree in law at the Hebrew University, while also undertaking undergraduate studies in economics and philosophy. In 1971 she began doctorate studies in the philosophy of law at Oxford University, under the supervision of the British scholar H.L.A. Hart. Her doctorate research examined the legal protection of privacy. In 1974 Gavison joined the Faculty of Law at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, heading the H. Cohen Chair of Human Rights. Her studies examine issues touching on the relationship between law and morality; issues of religion and state; the nature of law and the relationship between law and the role of the judge; and diverse issues from the field of public law. Gavison is a leading scholar in the field of law and society and a pioneer in the struggle for civil rights in Israel. She was one of the founders of the Association for Civil Rights in Israel and served as the association’s chairperson and president. Gavison has received numerous prizes over her many years of legal work, including the Zeltner Prize for Legal Research, the Avi Chai Prize (for her work on the new social covenant between observant and non-observant Jews in Israel), a prize from the Movement for
Tolerance, an Emet (Art-Science-Culture) prize in the legal and social sciences category, and the Israel Prize for Legal Research (2011).

Click Here for Detailed CV

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Dr. Joshua Guetzkow

Dr. Joshua Guetzkow

Assistant Professor (Lecturer) - Institute of Criminology
02-5882514

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Fields of Interest:

Criminal justice and social policy; culture and policymaking; social control; law and society; sociology of knowledge; mental health.

Homepage:

Department of Sociology & Institute of Criminology
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Mount Scopus, Jerusalem 91905

Positions Held

2010 – present Assistant Professor (Lecturer), Institute of Criminology & Department of Sociology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
2007 – 2009 Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Arizona.

Education

Princeton University, Sociology, Ph.D. 2004
Princeton University, Sociology, M.A. 2001
U.C. Berkeley. Sociology, B.A. (high honors). Cognitive Science, B.A. 1998

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Prof. Badi Hasisi

Prof. Badi Hasisi

The Institute of Criminology Faculty of Law, Director
02-5883387

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Education

2006-2007:  Post-Doctoral studies, School of Criminal Justice, SUNY Albany

2000- 2005: PhD in Sociology & Anthropology, University of Haifa

1996-2000:  MA in Sociology & Anthropology, University of Haifa (Cum Laude).

1993-1996:  BA in Sociology & Anthropology and History of the Middle East, University of Haifa

 

Representative publications

Hasisi Badi, Geoffrey Alpert and Dan Flynn. (2009). "The Impacts of Policing Terrorism on Society: Lessons from Israel and the U.S.", In D. Weisburd, T. Feucht, I. Hakimi, M. Lois and S. Perry, (Eds.), To protect and to serve: Policing in the years of terrorism, and beyond. New York: Springer: 177-202.

Hasisi Badi & David Weisburd. (2011). "Going Beyond Ascribed Identities: The Importance of Procedural Justice in Airport Security Screening in Israel", Law and Society Review, 45 (4): 867- 892.

Hasisi, Badi, Weisburd, David, Shoham, Efrat, Noam Haviv & Anat Zelig (2017) “The Rock of Sisyphus”: Treatment of Addicted Inmates and Recidivisim in Israel", Megamot  52 (2): 259-300

Simon Perry, Badi Hasisi & Gali Perry (2017) "Who is the lone terrorist? A study of run-over attackers in Israel and the West Bank", Studies in Conflict & Terrorism. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1057610X.2017.1348101

Hasisi, Badi. (2008). "Police, Politics and Culture in a Deeply Divided Society", The Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, 98 (3): 1119-1146.

Hasisi Badi and Weitzer Ronald. (2007). "Police relations with Arabs and Jews in Israel", British Journal of Criminology, 47: 728-745.

Badi Hasisi & Deborah Bernstein, (2016) "Multiple Voices and the Force of Custom on Punishment: Trial of `Family Honor Killings` in Mandate Palestine", Law and History Review. 34 (1): 115-154

 

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Tammy  Katsabian

Adv. Tammy Katsabian

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Tammy Katsabian is a PhD student at the law faculty of the Hebrew University and research fellow of the Cyber Law Program.

She is writing her thesis under the guidance of Prof. Guy Davidov. Her thesis focuses on the way the internet platform and virtual technology have influenced labour rights in a way that requires new understandings and redefinitions of basic concepts in this field, including fundamental workers’ rights. Her research is consisted of a series of articles focusing on the effects of the internet on three issues: the right to private life and privacy of the employee; the definition of “employee”; and freedom of association.

Tammy has an L.L.M degree from Yale Law School and Tel-Aviv University (cum laude) and an L.L.B degree from Bar Ilan University (cum laude). Alongside to her studies at the PhD program, Tammy was the executive director of the Clinical Legal Education Center at the Hebrew University from April 2013 and until October 2016 and served as the clinical advisor of the Women’s Rights at Work Clinic. Today she is working as the academic advisor of the Women’s Rights at Work Clinic.  

Alongside her academic activity, Tammy is participating in various social-change activities. She is board member of “Tmura Center” and “Shaharit” and a member of ISEF foundation. 

 

Dissertation Subject: Labor Rights in the Internet Age. 

Faculty Supervisor: Prof. Guy Davidov.

 

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Dr. Adi Leibovitch

Dr. Adi Leibovitch

Senior Lecturer
Room 223
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Dr. Adi Leibovitch is a Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Law and a member of the Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality. She served as a visiting professor at the University of Virginia School of Law, and as a visiting researcher at NYU School of Law, the University of Michigan Law School, and UCLA School of Law. 

Leibovitch's research focuses on the economic analysis of law, behavioral theory, and empirical methods, as applied to the study of the institutional design of courts, litigation, and legal decision-making, with a particular interest in the criminal justice system. She has published articles in leading peer review and law review journals, including the Journal of Legal StudiesNorthwestern University Law Review, and University of Chicago Law Review Online. Her research has received several awards and grants, including a research grant from the Israel Science Foundation, and the Russell Sage Foundation Presidential Award.  

Before starting to teach, Leibovitch was an Academic Fellow at Columbia Law School. She received her LL.M. and J.S.D from the University of Chicago Law School, where she was a John M. Olin Scholar at the Coase-Sandor Institute for Law and Economics, and a Russell Baker Scholar. She also earned her LL.B. and M.B.A, both magna cum laude, from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and her M.A. summa cum laude in public policy, mediation and conflict resolution from Tel-Aviv University. Leibovitch practiced law at the Military Advocate General Corps in Israel Defense Forces, where she served as legal counsel in the International Law Department, a prosecutor and deputy head of the Intelligence and Narcotics Section in the Chief Military Prosecutor's Office, and a public defender in the Office of the Military Public Defender for the Central District.

 

Education

J.S.D., University of Chicago Law School, 2016.
LL.M., University of Chicago Law School, 2011.
M.A., Tel-Aviv University, School of Public Policy, 2009.
M.B.A., Hebrew University, School of Business Administration, 2007.
LL.B., Hebrew University, Faculty of Law, 2005.

 

Representative Publications

Leibovitch, Adi, Institutional Design and the Psychology of the Trial Judge, in Bartosz Brozek, Jaap Hage, and Nicole A. Vincent (Eds.), Law and Mind: A Survey of Law and the Cognitive Sciences, pp. 193–206 (Cambridge University Press) (2021)

Leibovitch, Adi, and Alexander Stremitzer, Experimental Methods in Constitutional LawUniversity of Chicago Law Review Online (2021)

Leibovitch, Adi, Punishing on a Curve, 111(5) Northwestern University Law Review 1205 (2017).

Leibovitch, Adi, Relative Judgments, 45(2) Journal of Legal Studies 281 (2016).

 

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Leslie Sebba

Prof. Leslie Sebba

Lawrence D. Biele Chair of Law
02-5882571; 6718229

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M.A., Queen’s College Oxford (1964); L.L.M., London School of Economics (1966); Dr.Juris., Hebrew University of Jerusalem (1976).

Full Professor since 2001; Director of the Institute, 1986-9, 2000-3

Member of Israel Bar and Inner TempleLondon.

 

Visiting Appointments:

Visiting Fellow at: Center for Studies in Criminology and Criminal Law, University of Pennsylvania (1975-6); National Institute of Justice, WashingtonD.C. (1981-2); Institute ofCriminologyUniversity of Cambridge (1992); Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Wolfson CollegeOxford (1997); Human Rights Program, HarvardLaw School (2000); Wadham CollegeOxford (2003-4).

 

Founding editor of International Review of Victimology; other editorial board positions have included Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology,Journal of Quantitative Criminology, Interdisciplinary Review of Children’s Rights.

 

Member of Scientific Commission, International Society of Criminology; Acting ChairpersonIsrael Society of Criminology. Former Chair, Legal Committee of Prisoner Rehabilitation Council.

 

Publications:

“Third Parties”: Victims and the Criminal Justice SystemOhio StateUniversity Press, ColumbusOH, 1996.

Children’s Rights and Traditional Values (ed, with G. Douglas)Dartmouth,

Aldershot, 1998.

 “Victims’ Rights and Legal Strategies: Israel as a Case Study”, Criminal Law Forum,

Vol.11, 2000, pp. 47-100

“When is a Prisoner not a Prisoner? ‘Service Work’ in Israel – and in Britain?” 

Criminal Law Review, July 2001, pp.543-559.

“Child Protection or Child Liberation? Reflections on the  

Movement to Ban Physical Punishment by Parents and Educators”,          

International Review of Victimology , Vol. 12, 2005, pp.159-187.

“Formal and Informal Conflict Resolution in International Criminal Justice”, in H-J Albrecht et al.(eds.), Conflicts and Conflict Resolution in Middle Eastern Societies – Between Tradition and Modernity, Duncker and Humblot, Berlin, 2006, pp. 25-43.

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Katya Assaf

Dr. Katya Zakharov-Assaf

Senior Lecturer
Room 211
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Katya Assaf-Zakharov is a senior lecturer at the Law Faculty and the European Forum of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She studied law with a minor in sociology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (LL.B. and LL.M.) and did her Ph.D. studies at the Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich as a fellow of the Max Planck Institute for Competition and Innovation.

Katya has written on a variety of legal topics, such as advertising, trademarks, patents, freedom of expression, media regulation, defamation, and affirmative action. Her writings critically analyze consumer culture, brand fetishism, and capitalist ideology. They always combine legal analysis with insights from other disciplines, such as economics, sociology, psychology, philosophy, and semiotics. She is also interested in comparative law, particularly in comparing German and US-American legal regulations and tracing their cultural and philosophic roots. 

Recently, Katya’s research has begun to focus on urban public space. Together with the photographer Tim Schnetgöke, she is working to unearth the narratives embedded in our shared visual environment and criticize their legal regulation, such as the uneven treatment of graffiti or the privileged position of commercial advertising in public space. They aspire to develop a concept of a more inclusive city – one that would grant its residents a right to design and redesign public spaces. They are now looking to start an experiment implementing this idea as a project that would allow city residents to place their contributions – texts of images – in visible urban sites.

 

Education

1996-2000 – The Hebrew University, Faculty of Law, LL.B
2000-2002 – The Hebrew University, Faculty of Law, LL.M graduated with honors
2003-2006 – Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Faculty of Law, Ph.D. (Supervisor: Reto M. Hilty) graduated summa cum laude
won Law Faculty Prize at Ludwig Maximilian University
won Otto Hahn Medal, an academic award granted by the Max Planck Society

 

Representative Publications

Reading the Illegible: Can Law Understand Graffiti? (with Tim Schnetgöke)53 Connecticut Law Review (forthcoming 2021)

The Importance of Being First: Economic and Non-economic Dimensions of Inventorship in US-American and German Law (with Lisa Herzog), The American Journal of Comparative Law (forthcoming 2021)

Work, Identity, and the Regulation of Markets: A Study of Trademark Law in the U.S. and Germany (with Lisa Herzog), 44 Law & Social Inquiry 1083 (2019)

Non-Traditional Trademarks as (Non-Traditional) Means of Cultural Control?, in Non-Traditional Marks and the (Risks of the) Expansion of Trademark  Rights in Singapore (Irene Calboli & Martin Senflleben, eds.) Oxford University Press (2018)

Of Patents and Cobras: Changing the Incentive Structure of Patent Law, 35 Cardozo Arts & Entertainment Law Journal 1 (2017)

Buying Goods and Doing Good: Trademarks and Social Competition, 67 Alabama Law Review 100-139 (2016)

Capitalism against Freedom, 38 NYU Review of Law & Social Change 201 (2015)

Der Zauber der Marke, 2015 GRUR Int. 426 (2015)

Magical Thinking in Trademark Law, 37 Law & Social Inquiry 595 (2012)

Brand Fetishism43 Connecticut Law Review 83 (2010)

Der Markenschutz und seine kulturelle Bedeutung: Ein Vergleich des deutschen mit dem US-amerikanischen, 2009 GRUR Int. 1 (2009) 

The Dilution of Culture and the Law of Trademarks, 49 IDEA 1 (2008)

 

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