Empirical Legal Research

daphna-lewinsohn-zamir

Prof. Daphna Lewinsohn-Zamir

Dean
Louis Marshall Professor of Environmental Law
Room 232
02-5823845
Dean
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Professor Daphna Lewinsohn-Zamir is the Dean of the Faculty of law and Louis Marshall Professor of Environmental Law at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her fields of interest are property law and theory, economic and behavioral analysis of law, law and normative ethics, and empirical legal studies.

Prof. Lewinsohn-Zamir has clerked for Justice Dov Levin of the Israeli Supreme Court and in the Department of Constitutional and Administrative Law at the Ministry of Justice. She has received numerous awards and prizes, including the Hebrew University President’s Prize for Excellent Young Scholar (named after Yoram Ben Porat), the Fulbright Scholarship, the Rothschild Fellowship and the Zeltner Prize for Senior Scholar. She has been a Visiting Researcher at Harvard Law School, a Visiting Scholar at Yale Law School, and a Visiting Professor at the University of Chicago Law School, NYU Law School, Georgetown Law School, and the Center for Transnational Legal Studies (CTLS), London.

Prof. Lewinsohn-Zamir’s research was published in journals such as the Yale Law Journal, NYU Law Review, Texas Law Review, Cornell Law Review, Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, University of Toronto Law Journal, Law & Social Inquiry and Minnesota Law Review. Her latest book, “The Psychology of Property Law” (co-authored with Stephanie Stern), was published by the NYU Press.

 

Education

1986 – LL.B., cum laude, Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
1994 – LL.D. (Doctor of Law), summa cum laude, Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 

Representative Publications

The 'Conservation Game': The Possibility of Voluntary Cooperation in Preserving Buildings of Cultural Importance, 20 Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy 733-789 (1997);

Consumer Preferences, Citizen Preferences, and the Provision of Public Goods, 108 Yale Law Journal 377-406 (1998);

The Choice Between Property Rules and Liability Rules Revisited: Critical Observations from Behavioral Studies, 80 Texas Law Review 219-260 (2001);

The Objectivity of Well-Being and the Objectives of Property Law, 78 New York University Law Review 1669-1754 (2003);

In Defense of Redistribution Through Private Law, 91 Minnesota Law Review 326-397 (2006);

Identifying Intense Preferences, 94 Cornell Law Review 1391-1458 (2009);

Can't Buy Me Love: Monetary versus In-Kind Remedies, 2013 University of Illinois Law Review 151-194; 

Do the Right Thing: Indirect Remedies in Private Law, 94 Boston University Law Review 55-103 (2014);

The Importance of Being Earnest: Two Notions of Internalization, 65 University of Toronto Law Journal 37-84 (2015);

Law and Identifiability, 92 Indiana Law Journal 505-555 (2017); (with Ilana Ritov & Tehila Kogut).

What’s in a Name? The Disparate Effects of Identifiability on Offenders and Victims of Sexual Harassment, 16 Journal of Empirical Legal Studies 955-1000 (2019) (with Netta Barak-Corren).

 

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Keren W

Prof. Keren Weinshall (Margel)

Vice Dean
Member of The Israeli Young Academy of Arts and Sciences
Edward S. Silver Chair in Civil Procedure
Room 227
02-5882568
Vice Dean

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Education
Ph.D., 2012
Political Science Department, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Harvard Law School, Harvard University Visiting Researcher, 2009-2010
 
 M.A., 2007 (valedictorian),
Political Science Department, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem 
Ranked 1st in the P.S. Department and in the top 1% of Social Sciences' Faculty
Rector's list, 2007 
 
LL.B. (magna cum laude), 2003 
Faculty of Law, Tel Aviv University
Dean's List, 2002 
 
B.A. (magna cum laude) As part of a double major program, 2003
Political Science Department, Tel Aviv University
"Rector's List, 2002".

 

Representative publications

Lee Epstein, Gunnar Grendstad, Urˇska Sadl & Keren Weinshall  (Eds), The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Judicial Behaviour, Oxford University Press, under contract for 2023 publication.

Elena Kantorowicz-Reznichenko, Jaroslaw Kantorowicz & Keren Weinshall, Ideological Bias in Constitutional Judgments: Experimental Analysis and Potential Solutions. 19 Journal of Empirical Legal Studies (forthcoming 2022).

Christoph Engel & Keren Weinshall, Diffusion of Legal Innovations, 18 Annual Review of Law and Social Science (forthcoming 2022).

Lee Epstein, Urška Šadl & Keren Weinshall, The Role of Comparative Law in the Analysis of Judicial Behavior, American Journal of Comparative Law (forthcoming 2022).

Lee Epstein & Keren Weinshall, The Strategic Analysis of Judicial Behavior: A Comparative Perspective (monograph in Cambridge Elements in Law, Economics, and Politics), Cambridge University Press, (2021). 

Christoph Engel & Keren Weinshall, Manna from Heaven for Judges: Judges’ Reaction to a Quasi-Random Reduction in Caseload, 17 Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, 722-751 (2020).

Keren Weinshall & Lee Epstein, Developing 'Big Data' Infrastructure for Legal Analytics: Introducing the Israeli Supreme Court Database, 17 Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, 416-434 (2020).

Keren Weinshall, Udi Sommer & Ya’acov Ritov, Ideological Influences on Governance and Regulation: The Comparative Case of Supreme Courts, 12 Regulation & Governance, 315-427 (2018).

Christoph Engel, Alon Klement & Keren Weinshall, The Diffusion of Legal Innovations: A Case Study of Class Actions, 15 Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, 708-731 (2018).

Keren Weinshall-Margel & Inbal Galon, Cause and Effect in Sentencing, 37 Tel Aviv University Law Review (Iyunei Mishpat), 221-269 (2016).

Keren Weinshall-Margel, Inbal Galon & Ifat Taraboulos, Creating a Case Weight Index for Measuring Judicial Workload, 44 Hebrew University Law Review (Mishpatim), 769-814 (2015).

Keren Weinshall-Margel, Attitudinal and Neo-Institutional Models of Supreme Court Decision Making: An Empirical and Comparative Perspective from Israel, 8 Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, 556-586 (2011).

 [Received the first place award in the Best Paper Competition of the Rabin International Annual Graduate Conference]

Keren Weinshall-Margel & John Shapard, Overlooked Factors in the Analysis of Parole Decisions, 108 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 833-834 (2011)

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Neta Barak Corren

Prof. Netta Barak-Corren

Director, Center for the Study of Multiculturalism and Diversity
Member, Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality
Room 210
02-5882562
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Prof. Netta Barak-Corren is a legal scholar and cognitive scientist, focusing on empirical and behavioral analysis of constitutional and public law, with a particular interest in conflicts of rights and the interaction between law and religion and law and social norms. 

Barak-Corren received her first degrees in Law in Cognitive Science from the Hebrew University (Valedictorian and three-time recipient of the Albert Einstein and Rector awards). She then clerked for the Chief Justice of the Israeli Supreme Court, Hon. Dorit Beinish, and pursued doctoral studies at Harvard, graduating in 2016.

Currently, Barak-Corren is a Professor of Law at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Academic Director of the Center for the Study of Multiculturalism and Diversity at the Hebrew University. She is also an elected member of the Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. During 2020-2022 she is also a Nootbaar Religious Freedom Fellow at Pepperdine University School of Law. 

For more information on Barak-Corren's publications, public writing, research awards, and research grants, see here.

 

Education

S.J.D. Harvard Law School 2016

LL.M. Harvard Law School 2013

LL.B. and B.A. in Law and Cognitive Science, Hebrew University of Jerusalem 2012

 

Representative Publications

Netta Barak-Corren, Religious Exemptions Increase Discrimination Towards Same-sex Couples: Evidence from Masterpiece Cakeshop, Journal of Legal Studies (2021)

Netta Barak-Corren, Regulating for Social Integration by Behavioral Design: An Evidence-Based Approach for Culturally Responsive Regulation, Regulation and Governance (2021)

Netta Barak-Corren, Taking Conflicting Rights Seriously, 65(2) Villanova Law Review 295 (2020)

Netta Barak-Corren & Daphna Lewinsohn-Zamir, What’s in a name? The asymmetric effects of identifiability on offenders and victims of sexual harassment. 16(4) Journal of Empirical Legal Studies 955 (2019)

Netta Barak-Corren, Reexamining the evidence on Ultra-Orthodox attitudes and gender separation in academia. 49 Mishpatim—Hebrew U. Law Review (2019) [in Hebrew].

Netta Barak-Corren, Yuval Feldman, and Noam Gidron, The Provocative Effect of Law: Majority Nationalism and Minority Discrimination, 15(4) Journal of Empirical Legal Studies (2018). 

Netta Barak-Corren, Beyond dissent and compliance: Religious decision-makers and secular law, 6(2) Oxford Journal of Law and Religion 293-322 (2017).

Netta Barak-Corren, Does Antidiscrimination Law Influence Religious Behavior? An Empirical Examination, 67(4) Hastings Law Journal 957 (2016).

 

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Ori Katz

Ori Katz

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Ori Katz earned his bachelor’s degree summa cum laudein law and psychology from the Hebrew University. He also received rabbinical ordination from the Chief Rabbinate of Israel.Ori was admitted to the Israel Bar Association in June 2015

 

As a law student, Ori served on the editorial board of Mishpatim, Hebrew University's law review. He was research assistant for Professor Eyal Zamir and Professor David Gliksberg in the field of behavioral and empirical legal studies. In addition, Ori was a TA in “Contract Law” and “Legal Research and Writing.” Upon graduation, he clerked for Supreme Court Justice Hanan Melcer.

 

Currently a research fellow in the faculty, Ori is writing his dissertation titled “An Attitude-Based Theory of Judgments and Decision-Making in Contract Law,” under the supervision of Professor Eyal Zamir. As a Ph.D candidate, Ori has served as a TA in “Property Law” and in the Workshop in Law and Economics, and is currently an instructor in “Contract Law.” He also practices as a prosecutor in the Student Disciplinary Committee.

 

Ori was awarded the Kaye Einstein Scholarship and the Joanna Friedlander Prizeand earned a research grant from the Aharon Barak Center for Interdisciplinary Legal Research. His paper, “The Remedy of Enforced Performance: Law, Theory, and Empirical Findings,” co-authored with Prof. Eyal Zamir and Dr. Leon Anijdar, was accepted to the Mishpatimjournal.Ori presented it at the Conference on Empirical Legal Studies in Europe (CELSE), KU Leuven, May 2018.

 

Abstract of the dissertation:

Judges' attitudes are considered a key element of judicial decision-making. When a law is implemented, the decision-maker's personal normative inclinations play a significant role in determining decisions. This happens due to two main reasons: First, when legal rules generate interpretative ambiguity, applying the law to a specific case legitimately requires judges' own interpretation. Second, judges may have a desired outcome they are inclined to arrive at, and they consciously and unconsciously adjust their arguments accordingly.

 

Despite the importance of judicial attitudes, no attempt has been made to systematically account for the diversity in attitudes, or to develop an empirical tool to measure them. My dissertation will take the first steps in filling this gap specifically concerning contract law. It will have four primary goals: (a) Developing an attitude-based theory of contracts by mapping the core conflicts that divide judges, lawyers, legal scholars, and laypersons regarding contract disputes. (b) Constructing and validating a questionnaire to measure people’s contractual attitudes. (c) Investigating the correlations and causal connections between contractual attitudes and individual characteristics such as gender, political affiliation, legal education, and culture. (d) Exploring how contractual attitudes influence decision-making in contracts disputes, consciously and unconsciously.

 

Dissertation topic: An Attitude-Based Theory of Judgments and Decision-Making in Contract Law.

Supervisor: Prof. Eyal Zamir.

 

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Dr. Adi Leibovitch

Dr. Adi Leibovitch

Senior Lecturer
Room 223
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Dr. Adi Leibovitch is a Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Law and a member of the Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality. She served as a visiting professor at the University of Virginia School of Law, and as a visiting researcher at NYU School of Law, the University of Michigan Law School, and UCLA School of Law. 

Leibovitch's research focuses on the economic analysis of law, behavioral theory, and empirical methods, as applied to the study of the institutional design of courts, litigation, and legal decision-making, with a particular interest in the criminal justice system. She has published articles in leading peer review and law review journals, including the Journal of Legal StudiesNorthwestern University Law Review, and University of Chicago Law Review Online. Her research has received several awards and grants, including a research grant from the Israel Science Foundation, and the Russell Sage Foundation Presidential Award.  

Before starting to teach, Leibovitch was an Academic Fellow at Columbia Law School. She received her LL.M. and J.S.D from the University of Chicago Law School, where she was a John M. Olin Scholar at the Coase-Sandor Institute for Law and Economics, and a Russell Baker Scholar. She also earned her LL.B. and M.B.A, both magna cum laude, from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and her M.A. summa cum laude in public policy, mediation and conflict resolution from Tel-Aviv University. Leibovitch practiced law at the Military Advocate General Corps in Israel Defense Forces, where she served as legal counsel in the International Law Department, a prosecutor and deputy head of the Intelligence and Narcotics Section in the Chief Military Prosecutor's Office, and a public defender in the Office of the Military Public Defender for the Central District.

 

Education

J.S.D., University of Chicago Law School, 2016.
LL.M., University of Chicago Law School, 2011.
M.A., Tel-Aviv University, School of Public Policy, 2009.
M.B.A., Hebrew University, School of Business Administration, 2007.
LL.B., Hebrew University, Faculty of Law, 2005.

 

Representative Publications

Leibovitch, Adi, Institutional Design and the Psychology of the Trial Judge, in Bartosz Brozek, Jaap Hage, and Nicole A. Vincent (Eds.), Law and Mind: A Survey of Law and the Cognitive Sciences, pp. 193–206 (Cambridge University Press) (2021)

Leibovitch, Adi, and Alexander Stremitzer, Experimental Methods in Constitutional LawUniversity of Chicago Law Review Online (2021)

Leibovitch, Adi, Punishing on a Curve, 111(5) Northwestern University Law Review 1205 (2017).

Leibovitch, Adi, Relative Judgments, 45(2) Journal of Legal Studies 281 (2016).

 

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Ayelet tapiro-gordon

Ayelet Tapiro-Gordon

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Ayelet Tapiero holds a BA in Law from the Hebrew University (cum laude).

During her undergraduate studies, Ayelet was a member of the Hebrew University team which participated in the Philip C. Jessup International Moot Court Competition, representing the faculty at the Washington DC International Competition, and was awarded the Fritz Overlander Award for Outstanding Students in Public International Law. After her studies, Ayelet interned with Dr. Yaacov Weinroth in the field of litigation.

Ayelet worked as a research assistant to Prof. Yuval Shani doing research relevant to his membership in the UN Human Rights Committee.

Ayelet served as an academic advisor to the International Master's Degree Programs at the Law Faculty at Hebrew University. 

Ayelet is a Research Fellow in the Faculty of Law since 2016.

Ayelet’s doctoral dissertation is titled Regulating the Sharing Economy. Prof. Eyal Zamir is her doctoral advisor.

 

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Prof. Eyal Zamir

Prof. Eyal Zamir

Augusto Levi Professor of Commercial Law
Room 120
02-5823845; 052-4510121
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Prof. Eyal Zamir is Augusto Levi Professor of Commercial Law at the Hebrew University, where he served as Dean of the Faculty of Law, and was the founding director of the Aharon Barak Center for Interdisciplinary Legal Studies and a founding member of the Center for Empirical Studies of Decision-Making and the Law. He was a visiting scholar or visiting professor at Harvard Law School, Yale Law School, NYU School of Law, University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School, Georgetown University Law Center, UCLA School of Law, University of Zürich, Max Planck Institute of Economics in Jena, and the Center for Transnational Legal Studies in London.

Prof. Zamir’s research interests include economic and behavioral analysis of law, empirical legal studies, contract law and theory, and normative ethics and law. He authored or edited 18 books and published 80 articles. His latest four books were published with Oxford University Press. His articles were published in journals such as the Columbia Law Review, University of Chicago Law ReviewJournal of Legal Studies, Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, California Law Review, Virginia Law Review, American Journal of International Law, American Journal of Comparative Law, University of Toronto Law Journal, Law & Social Inquiry, Organizational Behavior & Human Decision Processes, and Public Administration Review.

Prof. Zamir presented his work in numerous conferences and workshops, including the annual meetings of the American Law and Economics Association and the Society for Empirical Legal Studies.

Prof. Zamir has been awarded numerous fellowships and prizes, including the Fulbright Researcher Award; the Rothschild Fellowship; the Hebrew University President’s Prize for Excellent Young Scholar named after Y. Ben Porat (first recipient); the Zeltner Prize for Senior Scholar; and the Justice Shneor Zalman Cheshin Prize for Academic Excellence in Law for Senior Scholar.

 

Education

1982 - LL.B. cum laude, Law Faculty, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel;

1989 - Dr. Jr., Law Faculty, Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
 

Representative publications

Law, Economics, and Morality 376 pp. (OUP, 2010, with Barak Medina); 
Chinese translation by Xu Dafeng (Fu Dan University Press, Shanghai China, 2015);

The Oxford Handbook of Behavioral Economics and the Law X+ 824 pp. (co-edited with Doron Teichman);

Law, Psychology, and Morality: The Role of Loss Aversion 258+18 pp. (OUP, 2014);

Behavioral Law and Economics XVII + 618 pp. (OUP, 2018, with Doron Teichman);

 “The Inverted Hierarchy of Contract Interpretation and Supplementation,” 97 Columbia L. Rev. 1710-803 (1997);

“The Efficiency of Paternalism,” 84 Virginia Law Review 229-86 (1998);

“The Missing Interest: Restoration of the Contractual Equivalence,” 93 Virginia Law Review 59-138 (2007);

“Law, Morality, and Economics: Integrating Moral Constraints with Economic Analysis of Law”, 96 California Law Review 323-91 (2008) (with Barak Medina);

“Revisiting the Debate over Attorneys’ Contingent Fees: A Behavioral Analysis,” 38 Journal of Legal Studies 245-88 (2010) (with I. Ritov);

“Loss Aversion, Omission Bias, and the Burden of Proof in Civil Litigation,” 41 Journal of Legal Studies 165-207 (2012) (with I. Ritov);

“Contract Law and Theory – Three Views of the Cathedral,” 81 University of Chicago Law Review 2077–2123 (2014);

“Affirmative Action and other Group Tradeoff Policies: Identifiability of the Adversely Affected People” 125 Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes 50-60 (2014) (with I. Ritov);

“Explaining Self-Interested Behavior of Public-Spirited Policymakers” Public Administration Review (2017) (with Raanan Sulitzeanu-Kenan);

“A Theory of Mandatory Rules: Typology, Policy, and Design” 99 Texas Law Review 283–340 (2020) (featuring Ian Ayres).

 

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