Faculty Type

Menachem Elon

Prof. Menachem Elon

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Menachem Elon was born in Dusseldorf, Germany in 1924. Between 1938 and 1945 he studied at Hebron Yeshiva in Jerusalem and was ordained as a rabbi. Toward the end of his yeshiva studies he began to study law at the High School of Law and Economics in Tel Aviv. He completed his studies in 1948 and received a license to practice law. From 1950 to 1954 Elon studied at the Faculty of the Humanities of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and from 1955 through 1962 he served as a senior assistant to the attorney and as a special consultant on Jewish law to the Ministry of Justice. In 1956 Elon began to teach family law and Jewish law at the Faculty of Law of the Hebrew University. After receiving his doctorate in law from the university in 1962, he was awarded the chair of Jewish law. In 1963 he founded the Institute for Jewish Law and in 1972 he received the title of professor. In 1977 Elon was appointed to the Supreme Court, and in 1979 he received the Israel Prize.  Elon published numerous books and articles, mainly in the field of Jewish law. In his work as a justice and as deputy president of the Supreme Court, he worked diligently to enrich Israeli law and to integrate aspects of Jewish law. This approach reflected his belief that, as he put it, Jewish law could bring a fresh and reviving spirit to Israeli law as it confronted contemporary problems. Professor Elon passed away in 2013

 

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Prof. Yitzhak Englard

Prof. Yitzhak Englard

Bora Laskin Chai in Law
Englard@supreme.court.gov.il

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Yitzhak Englard was born in Frankfurt, Germany in 1933. He immigrated to Israel in 1951 and attended the Bnai Akiva Yeshiva in Kfar Haroeh. From 1952 to 1956 he studied at the Faculty of Law of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, completing his studies cum laude. In 1958 Englard completed his master’s degree in law at the Hebrew University. He served as an intern with Supreme Court Justice David Goitein and in the Petitions Department of the State Attorney’s Office, and in 1960 he received his license to practice law. In  1966 he received a doctorate in law from the University of Paris, France. After completing his military service, Englard joined the Faculty of Law of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, serving as dean from 1984 through 1987. He has published numerous books and articles in diverse fields, including the laws of damages, religion and state, the theory of law, Jewish law, unjust enrichment, comparative law, legal competence, and child adoption. In 1992 Englard was appointed a member of the Israel Academy of the Sciences, and in 1996 he became a full member of the International Academy for Comparative Law. He received the Israel Prize for Legal Research in 1997. In the same year Englard was appointed as a Supreme Court justice, a position he filled until his retirement in 2003.

 

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David Enoch

Prof. David Enoch

The Rodney Blackman Chair in the Philosophy of Law
The Faculty of Law; Philosophy Department
02-5882583
david.enoch@mail.huji.ac.il
Room 212

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I’ve been a faculty member at the Hebrew U – on a joint appointment in law and philosophy – since 2003.

I work primarily in moral, legal, and political philosophy.

In moral philosophy, much of my work has been in metaethics, where I defend a fairly robust objectivist, realist view about morality and about normativity more generally. According to this view, there are moral (and other normative) facts that do not constitutively depend on us, that we discover rather than create or construct, and that are irreducible to run-of-the-mill natural facts. 

In the philosophy of law I sometimes voice skepticism about the more conceptual parts of the discussion about the nature of law, and I take part mostly in normative discussions about law, such as questions about the right status of statistical evidence, or about the role of luck in morality and law

In political philosophy I develop and defend a comprehensive liberal view – one that does not aspire to the kind of neutrality Rawls’s “Political Liberalism” aspires to. I criticize such Rawlsian views, and I try to accommodate, within liberalism, insights more commonly found among critics of liberalism.

In the faculty of law I usually teach jurisprudence (usually, the part that is really just intro to moral and political philosophy), and sometimes a workshop or seminar at the intersection of law and philosophy. In the philosophy department I usually teach the first-year course “Central Problems in Philosophy”, and various seminars (mostly in metaethics and in political philosophy).

 

Education

B.A. in Law and Philosophy, Tel Aviv University
PhD in philosophy, NYU

 

Representative publications

  1. Taking Morality Seriously: A Defense of Robust Realism (Oxford University Press, 2011).
  2. "Agency, Shmagency: Why Normativity Won't Come from What is Constitutive of Agency?, Philosophical Review 115 (2006), 169-198.
  3. "Reason-Giving and the Law", Oxford Studies in the Philosophy of Law 1 (2011), 1-38.
  4. "Moral Luck and the Law", Philosophy Compass 5 (2010), 42-54.
  5. "Being Responsible, Taking Responsibility, and Penumbral Agency”, in Ulrike Heuer and Gerald Lang (eds.) Luck, Value and Commitment: Themes from the Ethics of Bernard Williams (Oxford University Press, 2012).
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Lee Epstein

Prof. Lee Epstein

US Constitutional Law
epstein@wustl.edu

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Lee Epstein is the Ethan A.H. Shepley Distinguished University Professor at Washington University in St. Louis. Before returning to Washington U., she was Provost Professor of Law and Political Science and the Rader Family Trustee Chair in Law at the University of Southern California; the Henry Wade Rogers Professor, a University-wide chair, at Northwestern University; and the Edward Mallinckrodt Distinguished University Professor of Political Science and Professor of Law at Washington University in St. Louis.

In 2004, she was designated a Thorsten Sellin Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science; and in 2006 she was named a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She also serves as Lecturer in Law at the University of Chicago, a Principal Investigator of U.S. Supreme Court Database project, and co-editor of the Journal of Law, Economics, & Organization, among other professional positions. 

Professor Epstein's interests center on the U.S. Supreme Court, judicial behavior, empirical legal studies, and constitutional law. Her latest book, An Introduction to Empirical Legal Research(with Andrew D. Martin), was published in late 2014 (Oxford University Press). Other recent projects (with William M. Landes and Richard A. Posner) include The Behavior of Federal Judges(Harvard University Press, 2013); "Revisiting the Ideological Rankings of Supreme Court Justices" (Journal of Legal Sudies,forthcoming), "The Best for Last: The Timing of U.S. Supreme Court Decisions" (Duke Law Journal, forthcoming), and How Business Fares in the Supreme Court (Minnesota Law Review). Two new papers, "Foreword: Testing the Constitution" (with Barry Friedman and Geoffrey Stone) and "The Decision to Depart (or Not) from Precedent" (with Landes and Adam Liptak) will appear next year in the NYU Law Review.

She is now working on several books—one that examines how national and local economic trends affect judicial decisions and another, on diversity in the federal courts. Professsor Epstein is also co-editing (with Stefanie A. Lindqust) The Oxford Handbook of American Law and the Judiciary.

A recipient of 12 grants from the National Science Foundation, Professor Epstein has authored or co-authored over 100 articles and essays and 17 books, including The Choices Justices Make(co-authored with Jack Knight), which won the Pritchett Award for the Best Book on Law and Courts and, more recently, the Lasting Contribution Award "for a book or journal article, 10 years or older, that has made a lasting impression on the field of law and courts." The Constitutional Law for a Changing America series (co-authored with Thomas Walker), now in its 8th edition, received the Teaching and Mentoring Award from a section of the American Political Science Association. Other recent honors include a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship for her work on diversity in the federal courts, a Best Free Reference Website Award for the U.S. Supreme Court Database, (from Emerging Technologies, Association of the American Library Association), the Law & Courts Service Award, and an “Exemplary Legal Writing” Honor for On the Perils of Drawing Inferences about Supreme Court Justices from their First Few Years of Service (from Green Bag).

Professor Epstein teaches courses on constitutional law, judicial behavior, the U.S. Supreme Court, and research design and methods. In 2011, she received Northwestern University School of Law's Outstanding First-Year Course Professor Award. At Washington University she was named Professor of the Year by the Undergraduate Political Science Association and received a Faculty of the Year Award from the Student Union. She is also a recipient of Washington University’s Alumni Board of Governors Distinguished Faculty Award and the Arthur Holly Compton Faculty Achievement Award.

 

 

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רוני פקטור

Prof. Roni Factor

Associate Professor
Deputy Director of the Institute of Criminology
02-5882590
rfactor@mail.huji.ac.il

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Roni Factor is an Associate Professor at the Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His research brings an interdisciplinary perspective to the question of how the macro-level social context influences individuals’ antisocial and criminal behaviors. In studying these issues, he employs cutting-edge quantitative methods, using a variety of different types of data and research designs. His research so far has focused on three main areas. In the first, he studies how the macro social context and people’s position in society affects high-risk and criminal behavior, with a particular focus on traffic violations and road traffic crashes. In the second, he explores community–police relations and the legitimacy of law-enforcement institutions. In the third, he asks whether there is racial or ethnic bias in the work of law-enforcement institutions and develop new tools to measure it. 

 

Education

2000: B.A., summa cum laude, Department of Sociology and Anthropology and School of Education, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

2003: M.A., magna cum laude, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, specialization in Organizational Studies, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem  

2008: Ph.D., Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Transportation Research Institute, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology 

2011: Post-doctoral Research Fellowship, School of Public Health, Harvard University 

 

Representative publications

Factor, Roni, David Mahalel, Anat Rafaeli, and David R. Williams. 2013. A Social Resistance Perspective for Delinquent Behavior among Non-Dominant Minority Groups. The British Journal of Criminology 53 (5): 784-804

Factor, Roni. 2014. The Effect of Traffic Tickets on Road Traffic Crashes. Accident Analysis & Prevention 64, 86-91

Mehozay, Yoav, and Roni Factor. 2017. Deeply Embedded Core Normative Values and Legitimacy of Law-Enforcement Authorities. Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency 54(2): 151-180

Factor, Roni. 2019. A Quasi-Experiment Testing a Public Participation Process for Designing and Implementing an Enforcement Program among Minorities. Journal of Experimental Criminology 15:77-86

Factor, Roni, and Miriam Gur-Arye. (2020). Social Solidarity and Sentencing Disparities between Ethnic Groups: The Case of Hit-And-Run Traffic Offenses. Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, 17:164-185.

Factor, Roni., Gal Kaplan-Harel, Rivka Turgeman, and Simon Perry. 2021. Overcoming the Benchmark Problem in Estimating Bias in Traffic Enforcement: The Use of Automatic Traffic Enforcement Cameras. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 17:217-237.

 

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Prof. Ze'ev Wilhelm Falk

Prof. Ze'ev Wilhelm Falk

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Ze’ev Falk was born in Breslau, Germany in 1923. He began to attend the law classes provided by the British Mandate government in 1945 and completed his degree at the Faculty of Law of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Falk received his license to practice law in 1951, and in the same year he also completed a master’s degree in law. In 1952 he completed an additional master’s degree in Talmud, international relations, and Jewish history at the Hebrew University, and in 1959 he completed a doctorate in philosophy. From 1970 Falk served as a professor at the Faculty of Law of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His research initially focused on  the history of Jewish law, but he later concentrated on the philosophy of Halacha, attempting to find new meanings that would enable Halachic rulings to provide solutions for modern problems.  In 1955-1956 Falk served as the legal advisor to the Ministry of Welfare and the Interior Ministry. Prof. Falk established the International Society of Family Law and served as its first chairperson. In 1996 he was awarded the title of Worthy Citizen of Jerusalem. He passed away in 1998.

 

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Prof. Nathan Feinberg

Prof. Nathan Feinberg

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Nathan Feinberg was born in 1895 in Kovne (Kaunas), Lithuania. He studied law at the universities of Berlin and Zurich and received his doctor’s degree in law in 1918. He immigrated to Palestine in 1924 but continued to be active on the international academic scene. In 1928, for example, he traveled to Switzerland to specialize in international law, and some two years later he also received accreditation from the Institute for International Sciences at Geneva university, where he worked as a lecturer in international law through the end of 1933. Feinberg was a central figure in the establishment of the Faculty of Law at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and following the opening of the Faculty he was appointed a lecturer in international law and international relations at the university. In 1950-1951 he served as the first dean of the Faculty. Prof. Feinberg published numerous articles on legal and political subjects in journals and newspapers in Israel and around the world, writing in Hebrew, German, French, and Lithuanian. He received several awards for his work, including the title of Worthy Citizen of Jerusalem, and he served as an honorary member of the Institute for International Law. Feinberg passed away in 1988.

 

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Prof. Shneur-Zalman Feller

Prof. Shneur-Zalman Feller

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Shneur-Zalman Feller was born in Botoşani, Romania in 1913. He completed his academic studies in 1936 at the Faculty of Law of Cuza University in Yaşi, Romania. In 1945, after fleeing from Romania during the Second World War, he returned to his hometown and worked as an attorney. He also served as chairperson of the Jewish community and as deputy mayor. In 1948 he was appointed an investigative judge in Bucharest, and he later served as the head of Romania’s Legislative Department. In 1963 the authorities approved his request to emigrate to Israel. In 1965 Feller joined the Faculty of Law of the Hebrew University, serving as dean in the years 1971-1974. He published a large number of books, articles, and case law comments in legal journals in Israel and around the world, and had a crucial influence over the drafting of amendment 39 to the penal code. Feller won many prizes for his legal work, including the Yoel Sussman Prize for Legal Research in 1984. He was awarded the Zeltner Prize in 1994 and the Israel Prize for Legal Research in 1994.

 

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David Flatto

Prof. David Flatto

Faculty of Law and Department of Jewish Philosophy
02-5881172
david.flatto@mail.huji.ac.il

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Education

BA, Ordination, Yeshiva University

JD, Columbia Law School

Phd with distinction, Harvard University

 

Representative Publications

“Constructing Justice: The Selective Use of Scripture in Formulating Early Jewish Accounts of the Courts,” Harvard Theological Review (forthcoming)

 “Mishnah Makkot,” in The New Oxford Mishnah (eds. S. Cohen and H. Lapin, Oxford University Press)(forthcoming)

“Justice Retold: The Seminal Narrations of the Trial of the Judean King,” Journal of Law and Religion (Cambridge University Press) 30:1, 2015, pp. 3-35

“A Review Essay of Michael Walzer, In God’s Shadow: Politics in the Hebrew Bible,” Association of Jewish Studies Review (Cambridge University Press) 38:1, 2014, pp. 161-167

“Theocracy and the Rule of Law: A Novel Josephan Doctrine and its Modern Misconceptions,” Dine Israel 28 (2011), pp. 5-30

“The King and I: The Separation of Powers in Early Hebraic Political Theory,” Yale Journal of Law and the Humanities 20:1, 2008, pp. 61-110

 

 

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