Institute of Criminology

Barak Ariel

Prof. Barak Ariel

Institute of Criminology
+972-2-588-2502

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Education

BA (Psychology)

MA (Criminology)

LLB

LLM 

PhD

 

Representative Publications

Ariel, B., Levy-Ariel, Y., and Amram, S. (accepted). Did the number of domestic violence incidents in Tel Aviv increase during the Covid-19 lockdown? Insights from police records. Israeli Sociology: A Journal for the Study of Society in Israel.  

Martain, B. R., Harinam, V. & Ariel, B. (accepted).  Linking Body Worn Camera Activation With Complaints And Litigation: The Promise Of Metadata.  Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology.

Sabo-Brants, H. & Ariel, B. (accepted). Evidence map of school-based violence prevention programs in Israel. International Criminal Justice Review

Sherman, L. W., Neyroud, P., Strang, H., Ariel, B., Bland, Matthew, Tankebe, J., Wright, M., and Neyroud, E. (2020). How to Count Crime: the Cambridge Harm Index Consensus. Cambridge Journal of Evidence-Based Policing, 4, 1-14.

Langley, B., Ariel, B., Tankebe, J., Sutherland, A., Beale, M., Factor, R., & Weinborn, C. (2020). A simple checklist, that is all it takes: a cluster randomized controlled field trial on improving the treatment of suspected terrorists by the police. Journal of Experimental Criminologyhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s11292-020-09428-9

Ariel, B., Sherman, L. W., & Newton, M. (2020). Testing hot‐spots police patrols against no‐treatment controls: Temporal and spatial deterrence effects in the London Underground experiment. Criminology58(1), 101-128.

Ariel, B., Mitchell, R. J., Tankebe, J., Firpo, M. E., Fraiman, R., & Hyatt, J. M. (2020). Using wearable technology to increase police legitimacy in Uruguay: the case of body-worn cameras. Law & Social Inquiry45(1), 52-80.

Demir, M., Apel, R., Braga, A. A., Brunson, R. K. & Ariel, B. (2020). Body worn cameras, procedural justice, and police legitimacy: a controlled experimental evaluation of traffic stops. Justice quarterly37(1), 53-84.

Ariel, B., Sutherland, A., & Bland, M. (2019). The trick does not work if you have already seen the gorilla: how anticipatory effects contaminate pre-treatment measures in field experiments. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 1-12.

Ariel, B., Farrar, W. A., & Sutherland, A. (2019). Correction to: The Effect of Police Body-Worn Cameras on Use of Force and Citizens’ Complaints Against the Police: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Quantitative Criminology, 1-2.

Mills, L. G., Barocas, B., Butters, R. P. & Ariel, B. (2019). A randomized controlled trial of restorative justice-informed treatment for domestic violence crimes. Nature human behaviour, 1-11.

Ariel, B., Englefield, A. and Denley, J. (2019). 'I heard it through the grapevine': A randomized controlled trial on the vicarious effect of focused deterrence initiatives in criminal networks. The Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, 109(4), 819-867.

Frydensberg, C., Ariel, B., and Bland, Matthew (2019).  Targeting the most harmful co-offenders in Denmark: a social network analysis approach. Cambridge Journal of Evidence-Based Policing, 1-16.

Denley, J. and Ariel, B. (2019). Whom should we target to prevent? Analysis of organized crime in England using intelligence records.  European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice, 27(1): 13-44.

Macbeth, E., and Ariel, B. (2017). Place-Based Statistical Versus Clinical Predictions of Hotspots Locations in Northern Ireland. Justice Quarterly 

Weinborn, C., Ariel, B., Sherman, L., and O’Dwyer, E. (2017). Hotspots vs. Harmspots: Shifting the Focus from Counts to Harm in the Criminology of PlaceApplied Geography 

Ariel, B., Sutherland, A., Henstock, D., Young, J., Drover, P., Sykes, J., Megicks, S., and Henderson, R. (2016). ‘“Contagious Accountability” A Global Multisite Randomized Controlled Trial on the Effect of Police Body-Worn Cameras on Citizens’ Complaints Against the Police’. Criminal Justice and Behavior, doi:10.1177/0093854816668218 

Ariel, B. and Partridge, H. (2016). ‘Predictable Policing: Measuring the Crime Control Benefits of Hot spots Policing at Bus Stops’. Journal of Quantitative Criminology, doi:10.1007/s10940-016-9312-y 

Ariel, B., Weinborn, C., and Sherman, L. (2016). ‘Soft policing at hot spots–does it work? A randomized controlled trial’. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 12(7): 277–317

 

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avi_domb

Prof. Avi Domb

School of Pharmacy
Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law
Lionel Jacobson Prof. in Medicinal Chemistry
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Education

PhD chemistry

LLB

BSc Chemistry

B. Pharm.

Diploma-Polymers & Textile

Diploma-Business Administration


Representative Publications

1. Levinson J and Domb A. Disaster Victim Identification In Israel: A Multi-Disciplinary Approach.  Anil Aggrawal's Internet Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology 2013, 14(2), 1-18.

2. J. Levinson; K. Nahon; A. Domb, Biometric Identification: A Benefit-Risk Analysis of Israeli Applications, PACT 2014, 11. http://www.projectpact.eu/privacy-security-research-paper-series.

3. S Farah, KR Kunduru, T Tsach, A Bentolila, AJ Domb, Forensic comparison of synthetic fibers, Polym. Adv. Tech., 2015

4. A.J. Domb, The Field of Forensic Evidence-Future Prospective, Israel Police, 2011. Pp 300.

5. S Farah, T Tsach, A Bentolila, AJ Domb, Morphological, spectral and chromatography analysis and forensic comparison of PET fibers, Talanta 123, 54-62, 2014.

 

CV

Full List of Publications

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Badi Hasisi

Prof. Badi Hasisi

The Institute of Criminology Faculty of Law, Director
02-5883387

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Education

2006-2007:  Post-Doctoral studies, School of Criminal Justice, SUNY Albany

2000- 2005: PhD in Sociology & Anthropology, University of Haifa

1996-2000:  MA in Sociology & Anthropology, University of Haifa (Cum Laude).

1993-1996:  BA in Sociology & Anthropology and History of the Middle East, University of Haifa

 

Representative publications

Hasisi Badi, Geoffrey Alpert and Dan Flynn. (2009). "The Impacts of Policing Terrorism on Society: Lessons from Israel and the U.S.", In D. Weisburd, T. Feucht, I. Hakimi, M. Lois and S. Perry, (Eds.), To protect and to serve: Policing in the years of terrorism, and beyond. New York: Springer: 177-202.

Hasisi Badi & David Weisburd. (2011). "Going Beyond Ascribed Identities: The Importance of Procedural Justice in Airport Security Screening in Israel", Law and Society Review, 45 (4): 867- 892.

Hasisi, Badi, Weisburd, David, Shoham, Efrat, Noam Haviv & Anat Zelig (2017) “The Rock of Sisyphus”: Treatment of Addicted Inmates and Recidivisim in Israel", Megamot  52 (2): 259-300

Simon Perry, Badi Hasisi & Gali Perry (2017) "Who is the lone terrorist? A study of run-over attackers in Israel and the West Bank", Studies in Conflict & Terrorism. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1057610X.2017.1348101

Hasisi, Badi. (2008). "Police, Politics and Culture in a Deeply Divided Society", The Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, 98 (3): 1119-1146.

Hasisi Badi and Weitzer Ronald. (2007). "Police relations with Arabs and Jews in Israel", British Journal of Criminology, 47: 728-745.

Badi Hasisi & Deborah Bernstein, (2016) "Multiple Voices and the Force of Custom on Punishment: Trial of `Family Honor Killings` in Mandate Palestine", Law and History Review. 34 (1): 115-154

 

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Dr. Tal Jonathan-Zamir

Dr. Tal Jonathan-Zamir

Senior Lecturer
The Institute of Criminology Faculty of Law, Deputy Director
02-5882517
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Tal Jonathan-Zamir is a Senior Lecturer at the Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She received her M.Sc. from the Center for Investigative Psychology, University of Liverpool, in 2003, and her Ph.D. from the Hebrew University in 2011. Subsequently, Tal completed a Fulbright post-doctoral fellowship at the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. Her work focuses on policing, particularly on police-community relations and evidence-based policing. Using both quantitative and qualitative methods, she investigated police legitimacy and procedural justice from the perspective of citizens, communities, police officer, and neutral observers, in diverse contexts such as routine encounters, security threats, protest events, and airport security. She has also examined the psychological mechanisms underlying police officers’ orientation to evidence-based policing, and more recently – the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on police-community relations in Israel. Tal is the recipient of the 2010-2011 Fulbright Visiting Scholar Program, the 2015 Early Career Award from the Division of Policing of the American Society of Criminology, and the 2015 Young Scholar Award from the Israeli Society of Criminology. 

 

Education

2010 - 2011 Post-Doctorate Fulbright Fellowship at George Mason University, Department of Criminology, Law and Society. Host: Prof. Stephen Mastrofski.

2003 - 2010 Ph.D. in Criminology from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the Institute of Criminology. Supervisor: Prof. David Weisburd. 

2002 - 2003 M.Sc. in "Psychology and Investigation" from the University of Liverpool, Center for Investigative Psychology.

1999 - 2002 B.A. in Social Sciences from Bar-Ilan University

 

Representative publications

Jonathan-Zamir, T., Perry, G., & Weisburd, D. (2020). Illuminating the concept of community (group)-level procedural justice: A qualitative analysis of protestors’ group-level experiences with the police. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 48(6), 791-809.

Perry, G., & Jonathan-Zamir, T. (2020). Expectations, effectiveness, trust, and cooperation: Public attitudes toward the Israel Police during the COVID-19 pandemic. Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice, 14(4), 1073–1091. 

Jonathan-Zamir, T., Weisburd, D., Dayan, M., and Zisso, M. (2019). The proclivity to rely on professional experience and evidence-based policing: Findings from a survey of high-ranking officers in the Israel Police. Criminal Justice and Behavior. DOI: 10.1177/0093854819842903 

Jonathan-Zamir, T., and Harpaz, A. (2018). Predicting Support for Procedurally Just Treatment: The Case of the Israel National Police. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 45(6), 840-862. 

Mastrofski, S.D., Jonathan-Zamir, T., Moyal, S., and Willis, J. (2016). Predicting procedural justice in police-citizen encounters. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 43(1), 119-139. 

Jonathan-Zamir, T., Mastrofski, S.D., and Moyal, S. (2015). Measuring procedural justice in police-citizen encounters. Justice Quarterly, 32(5), 845-871. 

Jonathan-Zamir, T. & Harpaz, A. (2014). Police understanding of the foundations of their legitimacy in the eyes of the public: The case of commanding officers in the Israel National Police. The British Journal of Criminology, 54(3), 469-489.

Jonathan-Zamir, T., and Weisburd, D. (2013). The effects of security threats on antecedents of police legitimacy: Findings from a quasi-experiment in Israel. Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, 50(1), 3-32. 

 

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gali perry

Dr. Gali Perry

Lecturer
Institute of Criminology
02-5881590
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Gali Perry is a lecturer at the Institute of Criminology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She received her PhD from the Hebrew University in 2016, and then completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on political violence, and the policing of protest, political violence and terrorism. Gali is the recipient of the 2017 Golda Meir fellowship for early-career scholars and the 2019 Ellis and Alma Birk Prize in Law.

 

Education 

2011 – 2016  Ph.D., Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

2004 – 2006  M.A., Department of Criminology, Bar-Ilan University. Magna cum laude. 

2000 – 2003  B.A., Department of Psychology, the Open University, Tel-Aviv. Magna cum laude. 

 

Representative Publications 

Perry, G., and Jonathan-Zamir, T. (2020). Expectations, Effectiveness, Trust, and Cooperation: Public Attitudes Toward the Israel Police During the COVID-19 Pandemic. Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practicehttps://doi.org/10.1093/police/paaa060.

Jonathan-Zamir, T., Perry, G., and Weisburd, D. (2020). Illuminating the Concept of Community (Group)-Level Procedural Justice: A Qualitative Analysis of Protestors’ Group-Level Experiences with the Police. Criminal Justice and Behavior. https://doi.org/10.1177/0093854820983388.

Perry, G. (2020) Promoting protesters’ compliance: The effect of general perceptions of the police vs. police actions. Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice, https://doi.org/10.1093/police/paaa041.

Hasisi, B., Margalioth, Y., Jonathan-Zamir, T., Perry, G., Zamir, R., and Haviv, N. (2020). Mitigating the Consequences of Invasive Security Practices: A Quasi-Experimental Study in an(2020) Israeli Airport. Journal of Experimental Criminology. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11292-020-09424-z.

Perry, S., Hasisi, B., and Perry, G. (2019). Lone terrorists: A study of run-over attacks in Israel. European Journal of Criminology, 16(1), 102-123.

Perry, G., and Hasisi, B. (2018). Closing the Gap: Promoting Suspect Communities’ Cooperation with Airport Security. Terrorism and Political Violence, 1-20.

 Perry, G., Wikström, P.O.H., and Roman, G.D. (2018). Differentiating right-wing extremism from potential for violent extremism: The role of criminogenic exposure. International Journal of Developmental Science, 12(1-2), 103-113.

Perry, S., Hasisi, B., and Perry, G. (2017). Who is the lone terrorist? A study of vehicle-borne attackers in Israel and the West Bank. Studies in Conflict & Terrorism, 1-15. 

 Perry, G., Jonathan-Zamir, T., and Weisburd, D. (2017). The Effect of Paramilitary Protest Policing on Protestors’ Trust in the Police: The Case of the “Occupy Israel” Movement. Law and Society Review, 51(3), 602-634.

 

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