Dr. Tal Jonathan-Zamir

Dr. Tal Jonathan-Zamir
Senior Lecturer
The Institute of Criminology Faculty of Law, Deputy Director
02-5882517

Tal Jonathan-Zamir is a Senior Lecturer at the Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She received her M.Sc. from the Center for Investigative Psychology, University of Liverpool, in 2003, and her Ph.D. from the Hebrew University in 2011. Subsequently, Tal completed a Fulbright post-doctoral fellowship at the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. Her work focuses on policing, particularly on police-community relations and evidence-based policing. Using both quantitative and qualitative methods, she investigated police legitimacy and procedural justice from the perspective of citizens, communities, police officer, and neutral observers, in diverse contexts such as routine encounters, security threats, protest events, and airport security. She has also examined the psychological mechanisms underlying police officers’ orientation to evidence-based policing, and more recently – the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on police-community relations in Israel. Tal is the recipient of the 2010-2011 Fulbright Visiting Scholar Program, the 2015 Early Career Award from the Division of Policing of the American Society of Criminology, and the 2015 Young Scholar Award from the Israeli Society of Criminology. 

 

Education

2010 - 2011 Post-Doctorate Fulbright Fellowship at George Mason University, Department of Criminology, Law and Society. Host: Prof. Stephen Mastrofski.

2003 - 2010 Ph.D. in Criminology from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the Institute of Criminology. Supervisor: Prof. David Weisburd. 

2002 - 2003 M.Sc. in "Psychology and Investigation" from the University of Liverpool, Center for Investigative Psychology.

1999 - 2002 B.A. in Social Sciences from Bar-Ilan University

 

Representative publications

Jonathan-Zamir, T., Perry, G., & Weisburd, D. (2020). Illuminating the concept of community (group)-level procedural justice: A qualitative analysis of protestors’ group-level experiences with the police. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 48(6), 791-809.

Perry, G., & Jonathan-Zamir, T. (2020). Expectations, effectiveness, trust, and cooperation: Public attitudes toward the Israel Police during the COVID-19 pandemic. Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice, 14(4), 1073–1091. 

Jonathan-Zamir, T., Weisburd, D., Dayan, M., and Zisso, M. (2019). The proclivity to rely on professional experience and evidence-based policing: Findings from a survey of high-ranking officers in the Israel Police. Criminal Justice and Behavior. DOI: 10.1177/0093854819842903 

Jonathan-Zamir, T., and Harpaz, A. (2018). Predicting Support for Procedurally Just Treatment: The Case of the Israel National Police. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 45(6), 840-862. 

Mastrofski, S.D., Jonathan-Zamir, T., Moyal, S., and Willis, J. (2016). Predicting procedural justice in police-citizen encounters. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 43(1), 119-139. 

Jonathan-Zamir, T., Mastrofski, S.D., and Moyal, S. (2015). Measuring procedural justice in police-citizen encounters. Justice Quarterly, 32(5), 845-871. 

Jonathan-Zamir, T. & Harpaz, A. (2014). Police understanding of the foundations of their legitimacy in the eyes of the public: The case of commanding officers in the Israel National Police. The British Journal of Criminology, 54(3), 469-489.

Jonathan-Zamir, T., and Weisburd, D. (2013). The effects of security threats on antecedents of police legitimacy: Findings from a quasi-experiment in Israel. Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, 50(1), 3-32.