Research Centers

Ruti  Teitel

Prof. Ruti Teitel

Transitional Justice Colloquium: Contemporary Issues/ Israel-Palestine
The International Criminal Court and Transitional Justice: Tensions and Dilemmas
rteitel@nyls.edu

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An internationally recognized authority on international law, international human rights, transitional justice, and comparative constitutional law, Ruti Teitel is the Ernst C. Stiefel Professor of Comparative Law at New York Law School. She is a Visiting Fellow at the London School of Economics and Affiliated Visiting Professor at Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Her path-breaking book, Transitional Justice (Oxford University Press, 2000), examines the 20th century transitions to democracy in many countries. Born in Argentina, Professor Teitel’s interest in the topic grew out of the dilemmas confronting that society in the transition out of junta rule. Her book explores the recurring question of how new regimes should respond to past repression, contending that the law can play a profound role in periods of radical change in advancing a new sense of legitimacy.  In 2012, she published Humanity’s Law (OUP, 2012) setting out a paradigm shift in international affairs. Her latest book is Globalizing Transitional Justice (OUP 2014) which explores the last decade in the evolution of the field.

Her extensive body of scholarly writing on comparative law, human rights, and constitutionalism is published in many law reviews, including “Does Humanity Law Require (or Imply) A Progressive Theory of History? (And Other Questions for Martti Koskenniemi)” (Howse Rob co-author), “Rethinking Jus Post Bellum in an Age of Global Transitional Justice:  Engaging with Michael Walzer and Larry May,” “Beth Simmons’s Mobilizing for Human Rights:  A ‘Beyond Compliance’ Perspective,” (co-authored with R. Howse), “Posner’s Missing Concept of Law," (coauthored with R. Howse), "Beyond Compliance: Rethinking Why International Law Really Matters," (coauthored with R. Howse), “The Law and Politics of Contemporary Transitional Justice” and “Humanity’s Law: Rule of Law for the New Global Politics,” both in the Cornell International Law Journal, as well as “Comparative Constitutionalism in a Global Age” in the Harvard Law Review. She has contributed dozens of book chapters to published volumes relating to law and politics, including “Transitional Justice and the Transformation of Constitutionalism,” in the Comparative Constitutional Law Handbook (ed. Rosalind Dixon and Tom Ginsburg, Edward Elgar 2011 ); “Global Justice, Poverty and the International Economic Order,” in The Philosophy of International Law (Samantha Besson and John Tasioulas, eds., Oxford University Press 2010) (coauthored with Rob Howse) ; “The Transitional Apology” in Taking Wrongs Seriously: Apologies and Reconciliation (Stanford University Press, 2006), “Transitional Rule of Law” in Rethinking the Rule of Law After Communism (CEU Press, 2005), “Empire’s Law: Foreign Relations by Presidential Fiat,” in Sept. 11 In History: A Watershed Moment? (Duke University Press, 2003), and “Transitional Justice as Liberal Narrative” in Transnational Legal Processes: Globalisation and Power Disparities (Butterworths 2002). She also writes on human rights issues for a broader audience, having published in The New York Times, Legal Affairs, Findlaw.com and Project Syndicate. She serves on the Board of Editors of Oxford’s International Journal of Transitional Justice, of the Journal, Humanity as well the Editorial Advisory Board of the Interdisciplinary Journal of Human Rights Law.

A cum laude graduate of Georgetown University, Professor Teitel received her J.D. from Cornell Law School and has been a Senior Fellow at the Orville H. Schell, Jr. Center for International Human Rights at Yale Law School. She has taught at Yale, Fordham and Tel Aviv Law Schools, as well as Columbia University’s Politics Dept and its School of International and Public Affairs. 

She is founding co-chair of the American Society of International Law's Interest Group on Transitional Justice and Rule of Law, a life member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and a member of the ILA International Human Rights Law Committee.  Prof. Teitel is also on the Board of the London Review of International Law.  Last year, she was a Straus Fellow-in-Residence at New York University Law School’s Straus Institute for the Advanced Study of Law and Justice (2012-2013).

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shaw malcolm

Prof. Malcolm Shaw

Human Rights and the Law of Territory
shawmalcolm@hotmail.com

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As a practising Barrister Professor Malcolm Shaw has developed an international reputation for advising on territorial disputes; law of the sea; state succession; state immunity; recognition of foreign governments and states; human rights; self-determination, international arbitration and international organisations. Advice has been given to the UK Government Legal Department, Army Prosecuting Authority, CPS, and a varied and significant number of foreign governments, as well as international organisations, multinational corporations and private clients. He has appeared or is appearing before the International Court of Justice, the European Court of Human Rights, the European Court of Justice, the Court of Final Appeal (Hong Kong), the High Court of Ireland, the UK Supreme Court, the House of Lords, the Court of Appeal and the High Court of England.

In addition to a varied and wide international practice, he also has an extensive career in the academy, having been Head of a Law School, and a member of the national Law Panels for both the 1996 and 2001 Higher Education Funding Council’s Research Exercises, as well as a member of the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s Review of Law in 2005. He was the Founder Director of the Human Rights Centre, University of Essex, 1983 and is also the author of a widely-cited textbook on international law now in its seventh edition (2014) and of the fifth edition of Rosenne’s multi-volume work on the Law and Practice of the International Court of Justice (pending). He is a Trustee of the British Institute of International and Comparative Law and Member of the Commercial Bar Association (COMBAR) and of the International Law Association.

He is currently a Senior Fellow at the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law, University of Cambridge. He has also been a Visiting Professor at the University of Paris Ouest, Nanterre, France and Distinguished Visiting Professor of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel. He has given a considerable number of papers at home and abroad, including before the UN Security Council and in Hong Kong. He has also given the Hersch Lauterpacht Memorial Lectures at the University of Cambridge and the inaugural General Course on International Law at the Academy of International Law, University of Xiamen, China.

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Tammy  Katsabian

Adv. Tammy Katsabian

tammyk4@gmail.com

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Tammy Katsabian is a PhD student at the law faculty of the Hebrew University and research fellow of the Cyber Law Program.

She is writing her thesis under the guidance of Prof. Guy Davidov. Her thesis focuses on the way the internet platform and virtual technology have influenced labour rights in a way that requires new understandings and redefinitions of basic concepts in this field, including fundamental workers’ rights. Her research is consisted of a series of articles focusing on the effects of the internet on three issues: the right to private life and privacy of the employee; the definition of “employee”; and freedom of association.

Tammy has an L.L.M degree from Yale Law School and Tel-Aviv University (cum laude) and an L.L.B degree from Bar Ilan University (cum laude). Alongside to her studies at the PhD program, Tammy was the executive director of the Clinical Legal Education Center at the Hebrew University from April 2013 and until October 2016 and served as the clinical advisor of the Women’s Rights at Work Clinic. Today she is working as the academic advisor of the Women’s Rights at Work Clinic.  

Alongside her academic activity, Tammy is participating in various social-change activities. She is board member of “Tmura Center” and “Shaharit” and a member of ISEF foundation. 

 

Dissertation Subject: Labor Rights in the Internet Age. 

Faculty Supervisor: Prof. Guy Davidov.

 

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Dr. Tal Jonathan-Zamir

Prof. Tal Jonathan-Zamir

Associate Professor
The Institute of Criminology Faculty of Law
02-5882517
tal.jonathan@mail.huji.ac.il
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Tal Jonathan-Zamir is an Associate Professor at the Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She received her M.Sc. from the Center for Investigative Psychology, University of Liverpool, in 2003, and her Ph.D. from the Hebrew University in 2011. Subsequently, Tal completed a Fulbright post-doctoral fellowship at the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. Her work focuses on policing, particularly on police-community relations and evidence-based policing. Using both quantitative and qualitative methods, she investigated police legitimacy and procedural justice from the perspective of citizens, communities, police officer, and neutral observers, in diverse contexts such as routine encounters, security threats, protest events, and airport security. She has also examined the psychological mechanisms underlying police officers’ orientation to evidence-based policing, and more recently – the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on police-community relations in Israel. Tal is the recipient of the 2010-2011 Fulbright Visiting Scholar Program, the 2015 Early Career Award from the Division of Policing of the American Society of Criminology, and the 2015 Young Scholar Award from the Israeli Society of Criminology. 

 

Education

2010 - 2011 Post-Doctorate Fulbright Fellowship at George Mason University, Department of Criminology, Law and Society. Host: Prof. Stephen Mastrofski.

2003 - 2010 Ph.D. in Criminology from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the Institute of Criminology. Supervisor: Prof. David Weisburd. 

2002 - 2003 M.Sc. in "Psychology and Investigation" from the University of Liverpool, Center for Investigative Psychology.

1999 - 2002 B.A. in Social Sciences from Bar-Ilan University

 

Representative publications

 

Jonathan-Zamir Tal, Litmanovitz Yael, & Haviv Noam (2022). What Works in Police Training? Applying an Evidence-Informed, General, Ecological Model of Police Training. Police Quarterly. DOI: 10.1177/10986111221113975

Weisburd David, Jonathan-Zamir Tal, White Clair, Wilson David B., & Kuen Kiseong (2022). Are the Police Primarily Responsible for Influencing Place-Level Perceptions of Procedural Justice and Effectiveness? A Longitudinal Study of Street Segments. Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency. DOI: 10.1177/00224278221120225

Jonathan-Zamir, T., Perry, G., & Weisburd, D. (2020). Illuminating the concept of community (group)-level procedural justice: A qualitative analysis of protestors’ group-level experiences with the police. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 48(6), 791-809.

Perry, G., & Jonathan-Zamir, T. (2020). Expectations, effectiveness, trust, and cooperation: Public attitudes toward the Israel Police during the COVID-19 pandemic. Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice, 14(4), 1073–1091. 

Jonathan-Zamir, T., Weisburd, D., Dayan, M., and Zisso, M. (2019). The proclivity to rely on professional experience and evidence-based policing: Findings from a survey of high-ranking officers in the Israel Police. Criminal Justice and Behavior. DOI: 10.1177/0093854819842903 

Jonathan-Zamir, T., and Harpaz, A. (2018). Predicting Support for Procedurally Just Treatment: The Case of the Israel National Police. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 45(6), 840-862. 

Mastrofski, S.D., Jonathan-Zamir, T., Moyal, S., and Willis, J. (2016). Predicting procedural justice in police-citizen encounters. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 43(1), 119-139. 

Jonathan-Zamir, T., Mastrofski, S.D., and Moyal, S. (2015). Measuring procedural justice in police-citizen encounters. Justice Quarterly, 32(5), 845-871. 

Jonathan-Zamir, T. & Harpaz, A. (2014). Police understanding of the foundations of their legitimacy in the eyes of the public: The case of commanding officers in the Israel National Police. The British Journal of Criminology, 54(3), 469-489.

Jonathan-Zamir, T., and Weisburd, D. (2013). The effects of security threats on antecedents of police legitimacy: Findings from a quasi-experiment in Israel. Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, 50(1), 3-32. 

 

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Badi Hasisi

Prof. Badi Hasisi

The Institute of Criminology Faculty of Law, Director
02-5883387
badi.hasisi@mail.huji.ac.il

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Education

2006-2007:  Post-Doctoral studies, School of Criminal Justice, SUNY Albany

2000- 2005: PhD in Sociology & Anthropology, University of Haifa

1996-2000:  MA in Sociology & Anthropology, University of Haifa (Cum Laude).

1993-1996:  BA in Sociology & Anthropology and History of the Middle East, University of Haifa

 

Representative publications

Hasisi Badi, Geoffrey Alpert and Dan Flynn. (2009). "The Impacts of Policing Terrorism on Society: Lessons from Israel and the U.S.", In D. Weisburd, T. Feucht, I. Hakimi, M. Lois and S. Perry, (Eds.), To protect and to serve: Policing in the years of terrorism, and beyond. New York: Springer: 177-202.

Hasisi Badi & David Weisburd. (2011). "Going Beyond Ascribed Identities: The Importance of Procedural Justice in Airport Security Screening in Israel", Law and Society Review, 45 (4): 867- 892.

Hasisi, Badi, Weisburd, David, Shoham, Efrat, Noam Haviv & Anat Zelig (2017) “The Rock of Sisyphus”: Treatment of Addicted Inmates and Recidivisim in Israel", Megamot  52 (2): 259-300

Simon Perry, Badi Hasisi & Gali Perry (2017) "Who is the lone terrorist? A study of run-over attackers in Israel and the West Bank", Studies in Conflict & Terrorism. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1057610X.2017.1348101

Hasisi, Badi. (2008). "Police, Politics and Culture in a Deeply Divided Society", The Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, 98 (3): 1119-1146.

Hasisi Badi and Weitzer Ronald. (2007). "Police relations with Arabs and Jews in Israel", British Journal of Criminology, 47: 728-745.

Badi Hasisi & Deborah Bernstein, (2016) "Multiple Voices and the Force of Custom on Punishment: Trial of `Family Honor Killings` in Mandate Palestine", Law and History Review. 34 (1): 115-154

 

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Guy Davidov

Prof. Guy Davidov

Elias Lieberman Chair in Labour Law
02-5882581
guy.davidov@huji.ac.il
Room 213

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Guy Davidov is a full professor and the Elias Lieberman Chair in Labour Law. His book A Purposive Approach to Labour Law was published by Oxford University Press in 2016. He has also co-edited two books with Brian Langille, Boundaries and Frontiers of Labour Law (Hart, 2006) and The Idea of Labour Law (Oxford UP, 2011), and has published dozens of articles in peer-review journals, including in the Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, Modern Law Review, the University of Toronto Law Journal, Law & Social Inquiry, Industrial Law Journal, and the Comparative Labour Law & Policy Journal.​

Prof. Davidov was the founding Chair of the Labour Law Research Network (LLRN), from 2011 through 2015. He has also been the Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations from 2015 through 2020, and has previously served as editor of several Hebrew journals: Mishpat Umimshal – law and government, Hukim –Legislation (founding editor), and Labour, Society and Law (co-editor). 

Among his duties at the Faculty of Law, He is the coordinator of the Labour Law and Social Security Forum. He previously served as Vice-Dean of the Faculty, as the Academic Director of the Clinical Legal Education Center, as the Director of the Sacher Institute for Legislative Research and Comparative Law, and as Chair of Graduate Studies. He is currently serving as the Chair of the Hebrew University Faculty Union. 

Prof. Davidov studied at Tel-Aviv University (LLB 1996) and the University of Toronto (LLM 1998, SJD 2002). Before joining the Hebrew University, He was a faculty member at the University of Haifa for several years.

For further information and links to publications, see the personal website.

 

Eduction

1992-1996 – Tel-Aviv University, Faculty of Law, LLB Magna Cum Laude

1997-1998 – University of Toronto, Faculty of Law, LLM

1998-2002 – University of Toronto, Faculty of Law, SJD 

 

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Barak Ariel

Prof. Barak Ariel

Institute of Criminology
+972-2-588-2502
barak.ariel@mail.huji.ac.il

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Education

BA (Psychology)

MA (Criminology)

LLB

LLM 

PhD

 

Representative Publications

Ariel, B., Levy-Ariel, Y., and Amram, S. (accepted). Did the number of domestic violence incidents in Tel Aviv increase during the Covid-19 lockdown? Insights from police records. Israeli Sociology: A Journal for the Study of Society in Israel.  

Martain, B. R., Harinam, V. & Ariel, B. (accepted).  Linking Body Worn Camera Activation With Complaints And Litigation: The Promise Of Metadata.  Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology.

Sabo-Brants, H. & Ariel, B. (accepted). Evidence map of school-based violence prevention programs in Israel. International Criminal Justice Review

Sherman, L. W., Neyroud, P., Strang, H., Ariel, B., Bland, Matthew, Tankebe, J., Wright, M., and Neyroud, E. (2020). How to Count Crime: the Cambridge Harm Index Consensus. Cambridge Journal of Evidence-Based Policing, 4, 1-14.

Langley, B., Ariel, B., Tankebe, J., Sutherland, A., Beale, M., Factor, R., & Weinborn, C. (2020). A simple checklist, that is all it takes: a cluster randomized controlled field trial on improving the treatment of suspected terrorists by the police. Journal of Experimental Criminologyhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s11292-020-09428-9

Ariel, B., Sherman, L. W., & Newton, M. (2020). Testing hot‐spots police patrols against no‐treatment controls: Temporal and spatial deterrence effects in the London Underground experiment. Criminology58(1), 101-128.

Ariel, B., Mitchell, R. J., Tankebe, J., Firpo, M. E., Fraiman, R., & Hyatt, J. M. (2020). Using wearable technology to increase police legitimacy in Uruguay: the case of body-worn cameras. Law & Social Inquiry45(1), 52-80.

Demir, M., Apel, R., Braga, A. A., Brunson, R. K. & Ariel, B. (2020). Body worn cameras, procedural justice, and police legitimacy: a controlled experimental evaluation of traffic stops. Justice quarterly37(1), 53-84.

Ariel, B., Sutherland, A., & Bland, M. (2019). The trick does not work if you have already seen the gorilla: how anticipatory effects contaminate pre-treatment measures in field experiments. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 1-12.

Ariel, B., Farrar, W. A., & Sutherland, A. (2019). Correction to: The Effect of Police Body-Worn Cameras on Use of Force and Citizens’ Complaints Against the Police: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Quantitative Criminology, 1-2.

Mills, L. G., Barocas, B., Butters, R. P. & Ariel, B. (2019). A randomized controlled trial of restorative justice-informed treatment for domestic violence crimes. Nature human behaviour, 1-11.

Ariel, B., Englefield, A. and Denley, J. (2019). 'I heard it through the grapevine': A randomized controlled trial on the vicarious effect of focused deterrence initiatives in criminal networks. The Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, 109(4), 819-867.

Frydensberg, C., Ariel, B., and Bland, Matthew (2019).  Targeting the most harmful co-offenders in Denmark: a social network analysis approach. Cambridge Journal of Evidence-Based Policing, 1-16.

Denley, J. and Ariel, B. (2019). Whom should we target to prevent? Analysis of organized crime in England using intelligence records.  European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice, 27(1): 13-44.

Macbeth, E., and Ariel, B. (2017). Place-Based Statistical Versus Clinical Predictions of Hotspots Locations in Northern Ireland. Justice Quarterly 

Weinborn, C., Ariel, B., Sherman, L., and O’Dwyer, E. (2017). Hotspots vs. Harmspots: Shifting the Focus from Counts to Harm in the Criminology of PlaceApplied Geography 

Ariel, B., Sutherland, A., Henstock, D., Young, J., Drover, P., Sykes, J., Megicks, S., and Henderson, R. (2016). ‘“Contagious Accountability” A Global Multisite Randomized Controlled Trial on the Effect of Police Body-Worn Cameras on Citizens’ Complaints Against the Police’. Criminal Justice and Behavior, doi:10.1177/0093854816668218 

Ariel, B. and Partridge, H. (2016). ‘Predictable Policing: Measuring the Crime Control Benefits of Hot spots Policing at Bus Stops’. Journal of Quantitative Criminology, doi:10.1007/s10940-016-9312-y 

Ariel, B., Weinborn, C., and Sherman, L. (2016). ‘Soft policing at hot spots–does it work? A randomized controlled trial’. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 12(7): 277–317

 

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Einat Albin

Dr. Einat Albin

einat.albin@mail.huji.ac.il
Room 203
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Dr Einat Albin joined the Faculty of Law at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 2011. She teaches and writes in the field of labour law and more specifically works on labour law in a service world, labour and new technologies and on rights of persons with disabilities at work. These days she is involved in a large research project, funded by the Israel National Institute for Health Policy Research on the infringement of human rights in the name of public health, using COVID as a case study. Dr Albin holds an LL.M degree in ‘law, society and politics’ from Tel-Aviv University (cum laude), and a DPhil from the University of Oxford (where she was supervised by Prof Mark Freedland). Dr Albin serves as the Academic Director of the Minerva Centre for Human Rights in the Faculty of Law and is the academic counterpart of the Rights of Persons with Disabilities Clinic. During the years 2011-2017 she served as the Academic Director of the Clinical Legal Education Centre in the Faculty. Dr Albin has won prestigious prizes and awards throughout the years and published in leading law journals around the world. 

 

Education

LL.B in Law and Political Science, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem 

LL.M in ‘Law, Society and Politics’, Tel-Aviv University (Cum Laude) 

DPhil, University of Oxford  

 

Representative Publications

Einat Albin (2010), ‘Labour Law in a Service World’ 73(6) The Modern Law Review 959. 

Einat Albin and Virginia Mantouvalou (2012), ‘The ILO Convention on Domestic Workers: From the Shadows to the Light’ 41(1) ILJ 67. 

Einat Albin (2012), ‘From Domestic Servant to Domestic Worker’ J Fudge, S McCrystal & K Sankaran (eds) Challenging the Legal Boundaries of Work Regulation (Onati series, Hart). 

Einat Albin (2013), 'The Case of Quashie: Between the Legalisation of Sex Work and the Precariousness of Personal Service Work' 42(2) ILJ 180. 

Einat Albin, and Jeremias Prassl (2016), 'Fragmenting Work, Fragmented Regulation: The Contract of Employment as a Driver of Social Exclusion' in MR Freedland et al (eds) The Contract of Employment (OUP, Oxford). 

Einat Albin (2018), 'Customer Domination at Work: A New Paradigm for the Sexual Harassment of Employees by Customers' 24(2) Michigan Journal of Gender and Law 167 

Tamar Luster, Einat Albin,  Aeyal Gross, Miriam Tabenkin, Nadav Davidovitch (2021) ‘Promoting Vaccination from a Human Rights and Equity Perspective: Lessons from the Israeli 'Green Pass', The European Journal of Risk Regulation 2. 

 

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Tomer Broude

Prof. Tomer Broude

Bessie and Michael Greenblatt, Q.C., Chair in Public and International Law
tomerbroude@gmail.com
Room 228
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Professor Tomer Broude is the Bessie and Michael Greenblatt QC Chair in Public and International Law at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem Faculty of Law and Department of International Relations, where he has served as Academic Director of the Minerva Center for Human Rights and Vice-Dean of the Faculty of Law. His Doctoral Degree is from the University of Toronto Faculty of Law. He specializes in public international law and international economic law, particularly international trade and investment, human rights, dispute settlement, development and cultural diversity, and the behavioral economics of international law.

Broude is the author and editor of several books. His articles have appeared in journals such as International Organization, the European Journal of International Law, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Leiden Journal of International Law, Vanderbilt Law Review, Virginia Journal of International Law, Journal of World Trade, World Trade Review, Journal of International Economic Law, Columbia Journal of Transnational Law, Journal of World Intellectual Property and Law and Contemporary Problems. 

He is an Editor of the Journal of International Dispute Settlement and of the Cambridge University Press International Economic and Trade Law book series. 
He has served as co-chair of the International Economic Law Interest Group of the American Society of International Law (ASIL) and is one of the founders of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL). He is on the WTO’s indicative list of dispute settlement panellists, the list of Israeli arbitrators under the Israel-MERCOSUR Free Trade Agreement and Chapter 10 of the Canada-US-Mexico Agreement (formerly Chapter 19 of the North American Free Trade Agreement). He is a Member of the Advisory Committee under Israel's Trade Remedies Law.

 

Education

University of Toronto, Faculty of Law, Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Doctor of Juridical Science (SJD), 2004.

Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Faculty of Law, Jerusalem, Israel: Bachelor of Laws (LLB), 1996.

Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of International Relations, Jerusalem, Israel: Bachelor of Arts (BA) Cum Laude, 1996.

 

Representative publications

Books

International Governance in the World Trade Organization: Judicial Boundaries and Political Capitulation (London: Cameron May, 2004).

The Politics of International Economic Law (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011)(ed. With Marc L. Busch and Amelia Porges).

Multi-Sourced Equivalent Norms in International Law (Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2010)(ed. with Y. Shany).

 

Articles and Book Chapters

Broude T.  and Henckels, C., “Not all Rights are Created Equal: A Loss-Gain Frame of Investor Rights and Human Rights”, Leiden Journal of International Law (2020)

Broude T. and Levy, I., “Outcome Bias and Expertise in Investigations under International Humanitarian Law”, European Journal of International Law (2019)

Broude T. and Milikowsky, N. “Establishing an NHRI in a Contested Political Space: A Deliberative Process in Israel”, 37(3) Nordic Journal of Human Rights 281-299 (2019

Broude, T., “Social In/Equality and International Trade Reformisms of Fear”, 77 University of Illinois Law Review Online (2019)

Thompson, A., Broude, T.and Haftel Y.Z., “Once Bitten, Twice Shy? How Disputes Affect Regulatory Space in Investment Agreements”, 73(4) International Organization 859-880 (2019)

“Arbitration from a Law & Economics Perspective”, forthcoming in Thomas Schultz & Federico Ortino (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of International Arbitration, Oxford University Press, 2018 (with Anne van Aaken).

“The Trans-Pacific Partnership and Regulatory Space: A Comparison of Treaty Texts”, Journal of International Economic Law (2017)(with Yoram Z. Haftel and Alexander Thompson).

“Deontology, Functionality and Scope in the Sovereignty of Human Rights”, Jerusalem Review of Legal Studies (2017).

“Between Geneva and Jerusalem: Government-Civil Society Interaction before UN Treaty Monitoring Bodies as a Means of Incorporating International Human Rights in Israel”, Hukim (2017)(with Shlomi Balaban).

“Selective Subsidiarity and Dialectic Deference in the World Trade Organization”, 78 Law and Contemporary Problems 2016.

“Behavioral International Law”, 163 University of Pennsylvania Law Review 2015.

“A Diet Too Far? Intangible Cultural Heritage, Cultural Diversity, and Culinary Practices”, in Irene Calboli and Srividhya Radavan (eds.), Protecting and Promoting Diversity with Intellectual Property Law (Cambridge University Press, 2015).

 

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