Institutes and Centers

A significant part of the academic activity in the law school is organized by institutes and centers that specialize in specific areas. These activities include, among other things, workshops, international conferences, and guest lectures. 

 

This part of the website includes the individual sites of each institute and center, in which you can find complete information on activities, faculty members, and more.

Institutes and Centers

Campus-Community Partnership

For our Website in English please click here 
  

The Campus-Community Partnership was established to promote the mutual commitment of institutions of higher education, students, and the community - to act for social justice and human rights in Israeli society. The Partnership, hosted by the Faculty of Law of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, serves all institutions of higher education in the state of Israel.

Community and Youth, Edmond J. Safra Campus, Givat Ram.

 

 

We act to:

  • Engage Israeli institutions of higher education with the pressing social issues of the day;
  • Develop the intellectual and social change capabilities of a new generation of Jewish and Arab students who will go on to become active citizens and leaders for social change in their communities;
  • Bring academic knowledge into deeper engagement with community organizations.

We integrate the resources and capabilities of students, faculty members, institutions of higher education and social change organizations by:

  • Encouraging institutions of higher education to develop a policy of social engagement;
  • Supporting faculty members in developing community-engaged courses ("service learning courses") that combine theoretical study with student internships in community organizations;
  • Organizing workshops, seminars and conferences to exchange, develop and disseminate knowledge and experience regarding community-engaged learning and campus-community partnerships.

Our page in Inter Agnecy Task Force.

About us

The Campus-Community Partnership was established to promote the mutual commitment of institutions of higher education, students, and the community – to act for social justice and human rights in Israeli society. The Partnership, hosted by the Faculty of Law of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, serves all institutions of higher education in the state of Israel.
 
We act to:
  • Engage Israeli institutions of higher education with the pressing social issues of the day;
  • Develop the intellectual and social change capabilities of a new generation of Jewish and Arab students who will go on to become active citizens and leaders for social change in their communities;
  • Bring academic knowledge into deeper engagement with community organizations.
 
We integrate the resources and capabilities of students, faculty members, institutions of higher education and social change organizations by:
  • Encouraging institutions of higher education to develop a policy of social engagement;
  • Supporting faculty members in developing community-engaged courses ("service learning courses") that combine theoretical study with student internships in community organizations;
  • Organizing workshops, seminars and conferences to exchange, develop and disseminate knowledge and experience regarding community-engaged learning and campus-community partnerships.
 
SCHOLARSHIP AND ACTIVISM
Since 2006, the Partnership has supported the development of dozens of community-engaged courses integrating Jewish and Arab students' action for social change, social justice and human rights. These courses have been implemented at 15 universities and colleges throughout Israel – from Tel-Hai College in the north, to Ben-Gurion University's Eilat campus in the south. They have encompassed a wide range of disciplines and fields of knowledge including law, sociology, gender studies, human rights, art, music, architecture, regional planning, social work, education, geography, political science, and environmental studies.
 
Community-engaged courses value classroom diversity, enabling rare interaction and dialogue among students from different social groups. The students participating in the courses come from diverse ethnic and religious backgrounds, and include Jews and Arabs, immigrants and native-born Israelis. For many of these groups the campus is the first and sometimes only site of encounter with the other. Community-engaged courses leverage on this encounter – to promote joint action for social change.
 
Community-engaged courses seek to broaden students' understanding of the social context of their academic studies, guiding them to develop skills for social change and to deepen their civic responsibility. Importantly, these courses promote the empowerment and active citizenship of marginalized social groups, by providing students from underprivileged backgrounds with access to opportunities of service to their home communities.
 
 
COMMUNITY-ENGAGED POLICY
We have encouraged the Council for Higher Education in Israel (CHE) to adopt policies that enhance and facilitate the social engagement of students, faculty members, and institutions of higher education. Our efforts have led to the allocation by the CHE of resources for promoting the social engagement of institutions of higher education. Together with the CHE, the Partnership has held study days and conferences for heads of institutions of higher education, deans of students, and faculty members.
 
 
KNOWLEDGE EXCHANGE AND ADVOCACY
Our work throughout the years has involved the organizing of several venues that bring together faculty members, active students, civil society organizations, and representatives of institutions of higher education. The goal of these venues is to enable knowledge exchange and joint learning about the academy-community relationship, and to foster networks and cooperation among participants. Such venues include:
  •  Workshops for faculty members teaching community-engaged courses or interested in developing such courses, to discuss topics such as service learning pedagogy, work with civil society organizations and evaluation.
  • Student seminars, both local and national, to encourage and enhance Jewish and Arab students' action in social change organizations, focusing on issues such as critical pedagogy, community organizing, legal aid, and human rights advocacy.
  • An annual conference for all stakeholders in campus-community programs, to present knowledge about engaged policies, best practices, and research of community-engaged courses.

Tel.

+972 (0)2-588-1389 

Fax

+972 (0)2-588-2968

 

E-Mail

campuschange@savion.huji.ac.il

 

Address

Campus-Community Partnership

Faculty of Law

Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mt. Scopus, Jerusalem 9190501 Israel

Staff

  • Prof. Daphna Golan - Director
    daphna.golan@mail.huji.ac.il                                                                                                                          

Steering Committee

Courses

Since 2006, the Partnership has supported the development of dozens of community-engaged coursesintegrating Jewish and Arab students' action for social change, social justice and human rights. These courses have been implemented at 15 universities and colleges throughout Israel – from Tel-Hai College in the north, to Ben-Gurion University's Eilat campus in the south. They have encompassed a wide range of disciplines and fields of knowledge including law, sociology, gender studies, human rights, art, music, architecture, regional planning, social work, education, geography, political science, and environmental studies.

For lists of the courses we supported in the years 2006-2011 click here.

For lists of the social change organizations click here.

 

Since the 2011/12 academic year, we have continued to advance community-engaged courses by:

  • Advising faculty members who teach community-engaged courses or are interested in developing such courses.
  • Advancing cooperation and partnerships between community-engaged courses and social change organizations.
  • Developing research, documentation and writing to allow dissemination of knowledge in the field.
  • Continuing to hold study days and workshops for joint study, reflection, and upholding of faculty members, civil society organizations, and representatives of institutions of higher education involved in community-engagement programs.

Courses supported by the Campus-Community Partnership

Courses 2006-2007

Gender and Human Rights – Between Criminology, Victimology and Social Action

Dr. Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian
Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Fourteen students enrolled in this innovative course, jointly offered by the School of Social Work and the Criminology Department at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and taught by Dr. Katalin Katz and Dr. Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian. The course integrates theoretical study of human rights advocacy methods and critical concepts with four hours of volunteering at a range of governmental and non-governmental organizations, including the Association for Civil Rights in Israel, the Jerusalem municipality, the Israel Association for Child Protection, Elem – Youth in Distress, and more. Some of the projects in which the students are involved include: workshops for women on sexual rights, coordination of a coalition of organizations on the protection of children on the internet, advocacy for Sudanese refugees, and more.

Human Rights, Community, and Planning Policy in Israel 

Dr. Haim Yacobi and Dr. Neve Gordon
Department of Politics and Government, Ben Gurion University
Twelve students are enrolled in this course, offered by the politics and government department at Ben Gurion University in Beer Sheva and taught by Dr. Haim Yacobi. The course highlights the connection between human rights as a concept and a tool for social change, and planning policy as a practice engaged in organization of space and allocation of resources. In addition to their coursework, students volunteer for at least five hours a week at a human rights or social justice organization, culminating in an analysis or policy document that they write for the organization. The course places special emphasis on disadvantaged communities in the south of Israel and issues of employment, environment, and health.
 

Informal Education and Social Change

Dr. Dalya Markovich and Dr. Hagit Kilvansky
Program for Community Organizing and Administration, Beit Berl College
The course aims to form a connection between the field of non-formal education and active civic engagement. It discussed the non-formal education field as a potential sphere for civic activism and social change, and the different ways in which non-formal education leverages diverse social action and human rights. The experience in the field is designed to provide students with tools and skills for civic activism. The theoretical and practical study is intended to reflect and analyze some of the dilemmas, contradictions and new horizons characterizing this distinct sphere.
The classroom consists of Jewish and Palestinian faculty and students, who through joint action and study throughout the year learn to bridge over initial differences and work together towards a common goal.
 
Legal Feminism and Social Change
Adv. Dana Myrtenbaum, Odette Falach and Dr. Noya Rimalt
Faculty of Law, Haifa University
The program is a unique cooperation between the Haifa University’s Faculty of law and Itach-Maaki – Women Lawyers for Social Justice, a Jewish-Arab feminist legal advocacy organization. The program’s vision is to promote access to justice for women from disadvantaged communities and marginalized individuals, as well as to challenge the existing power structure in the legal world and its gender and cultural blindness. Through this unique program Jewish and Arab law students have the opportunity to openly and critically engage with questions of intergroup relations, power, and accessibility.
The program aspires to impact future lawyers by exposing Jewish and Arab law students at the University of Haifa to women’s struggles and strength, and to the power of the law in the process of social change. Along with the law students, a group of Arab and Jewish women from marginalized communities go through an empowerment process as they are trained to be “legal leaders” whose voices will be heard in the public sphere and who are committee to issues of gender and status shared by all marginalized Israeli women.
Pairing together women leaders and law students, the program’s participants act together in designing and implementing seed projects to enable marginalized voices of women and disempowered communities to be heard and seen by decision-makers, the legal system, courts, media, the general public and more. The model, co-coordinated by a Jewish attorney and an Arab-Druze psychologist, equips a multi-cultural group of women activists and law students with effective social change tools and guides them in their quest for long term social change.
Projects developed by the program include: empowering Arab and Jewish women in providing legal assistance by making accessible the Family Court in Haifa; promoting and advancing the rights of Arab-Druze women in the divorce process; construction of a rehabilitation program for women involved in prostitution and raising public awareness to their situation, and more.
 

Legal Clinic for Representation of Youth

Adv. Sharon Sionov Arad
Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
19 students are enrolled in this course, which is offered by the Law Faculty at Hebrew University and taught by attorneys Sharon Zionov, Reut Rosner and Shiran Reichenberg. Through this course law students gain practical experience in representing youth and in providing legal aid and representation. Students study a range of topics including legal aspects in the lives of children and youth, how bureaucratic systems treat young people, how social gaps and inequality affect the lives of youth, children and young people as a disadvantaged group, international aspects of children's rights, and more. Students commit to working at the clinic between 6-10 hours a week, staffing the clinic, providing representation, conducting workshops and marketing the clinic to young people. The clinic works with a range of social organizations as well as with governmental and non-governmental agencies and the Israeli courts.
 
Community Interpreting
Prof. Miriam Shlesinger and Dr. Michal Schuster
Department of Translation and Interpreting Studies, Bar-Ilan University
The course in community interpreting trains bilingual students to leverage their knowledge of a second language for the benefit of those who have difficulty accessing various public services because they do not speak Hebrew. It addresses such issues as the role of language in creating – and reducing – power imbalances, the ethics of intercultural mediation, advocacy and empowerment, and the rights o language minorities in a multilingual society.

Students – speakers of Arabic, Russian, Amharic, Spanish, French and English (in addition to Hebrew) – spend 4 hours each week volunteering as language mediators (translator/interpreters). Their assignments vary widely and include hospitals (primarily mediating between Arabic-speaking patients, many of them from Gaza, and the medical staff); rehabilitational facilities (assisting therapists in diagnosing and treating children who have undergone trauma); NGOs (such as Physicians for Human Rights); well baby clinics; immigration center; and municipal services and social security offices. The students’ language skills are curial in easing tension in these very charged settings and promote an understanding of the importance of language access, while enhancing public awareness of language in the context of human rights. Importantly, the course brings together students from a variety of backgrounds, many of whom have never been exposed to the other before. As a result the students undergo an intense process of tolerance building, understanding, and transformation of previously hostile relationships.

  

Rights of the Palestinian Arab Minority in Israel

Dr. Yousef Jabareen and Dr. Ilan Saban
Faculty of Law, Haifa University
The course examines the legal status of the Arab citizens of Israel, and questions the capacity of the law to serve s a tool for social change. Its framework creates a setting for Arab-Jewish student partnership, modeled by the course lecturers. Students in the course create Arab and Jewish work teams. Student intern and aid six human rights organizations advancing the status of the Palestinian minority in Israel.
The faculty members, course coordinator and representatives of the organizations outline students’ projects in advance, to ensure that they address key issues, while the course aims to imitate at least one independent project annually. Students in the course have been assisting in the preparation of an appeal regarding the conditions for admittance to institutions of higher education. Today, universities and colleges require an arbitrary minimal age that predominantly discriminates against Arab citizens. A team of students has been working on the preparation of an appeal regarding profiling in public places, which results in discrimination based on nationality. Other teams have been working to connect school sin the unrecognized villages of the Negev to electricity and running water, and have begun to draft an appeal regarding discrimination practices in acceptance to newly established community settlements in the Negev.
 

Active Involvement of Education Students in Women's Rights Organziations

Dr. Nira Reiss and Ornat Turin
Communications Department, Gordon College of Education
School-teaching today requires a democratic attitude as well as leadership skills. One of the primary goals of teacher training programs is to empower future teachers by promoting autonomous thinking andpractical contributions to an egalitarian society. Teachers have a crucial role as agents of socialization of young girls and boys. The importance of empowering teachers as women, combined with the role of these teachers in gender education, lead us to look for ways to engage women students of education with feminist thinking and practice,as part of their training.
The course will involve a group of education students at Gordon School of Education in Haifa in the activities of women's grass-roots organizations working for women's rights, in order to familiarize these students with the principles of the women's liberation movement in the 21st century, to empower them as women, as teachers and as citizens, and to broaden their understanding of social change. The course is designed for third and fourth year students and will include theoretical aspects of human rights and of feminism alongside guided volunteer work in one of the women's organizations.
The students will volunteer in one of the following organizations in Haifa:
The Shelters for Victims of Domestic Abuse, Isha Le-isha (Woman to Woman) Center, Kayan, and Itach-Maaki. Guest speakers from these organizations will introduce their organizations during the first few sessions of the course.

Women Leading Change – Workshop for Studying of and Volunteering in Women’s Social Change Organizations

Dr. Hanna Safran
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Emek Yezreel College
The course will be held in the form of a workshop, and will include volunteering in a women’s organization. The first section of the course will be devoted to study of the organizations’ actions in the community, through the mapping of and acquaintance with third sector organizations and their work methods. The second section will be devoted to volunteering in a specific organization, including the study of the organization and its ways of action. In the third section of the course, the students will describe their experience in writing, referring to theoretical materials, present their work to the class, and learn to give and receive feedback.
 

Bureaucracy, Governmentality and Human Rights

Prof. Yehouda Shenhav and Adv. Yael Barda
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Tel Aviv University
The course is a seminar combining theory and practice. In addition to Prof. Shenhav's lectures, Adv. Michael Sfrad, the legal advisor of "Yesh Din" will accompany the course as a guest lecturer. Every two weeks, the students will take part in Yesh Din's project of observers of military courts, and in Machsom Watch's project of assistance at the District Coordination Offices in the Palestinian territories. Under the direction of these organizations, the students will be involved in documentation, advocacy and coordination while maintaining a journal documenting their activity. The students will be guided by Adv. Yael Berda, both individually and in groups.

Courses 2007-2008

Gender and Human Rights – Between Criminology, Victimology and Social Action

Dr. Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian
Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Fourteen students enrolled in this innovative course, jointly offered by the School of Social Work and the Criminology Department at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and taught by Dr. Katalin Katz and Dr. Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian. The course integrates theoretical study of human rights advocacy methods and critical concepts with four hours of volunteering at a range of governmental and non-governmental organizations, including the Association for Civil Rights in Israel, the Jerusalem municipality, the Israel Association for Child Protection, Elem – Youth in Distress, and more. Some of the projects in which the students are involved include: workshops for women on sexual rights, coordination of a coalition of organizations on the protection of children on the internet, advocacy for Sudanese refugees, and more.
 
Human Rights, Community, and Planning Policy in Israel 
Dr. Haim Yacobi and Dr. Neve Gordon
Department of Politics and Government, Ben Gurion University
Twelve students are enrolled in this course, offered by the politics and government department at Ben Gurion University in Beer Sheva and taught by Dr. Haim Yacobi. The course highlights the connection between human rights as a concept and a tool for social change, and planning policy as a practice engaged in organization of space and allocation of resources. In addition to their coursework, students volunteer for at least five hours a week at a human rights or social justice organization, culminating in an analysis or policy document that they write for the organization. The course places special emphasis on disadvantaged communities in the south of Israel and issues of employment, environment, and health.
 

Education with a View Towards the Community

Dr. Tamar Hagar, Adv. Yael Efron, Tufaha Saba and Nava Shay
Department of Education, Tel-Hai Academic College
Fourteen students are enrolled in this program at Tel Hai College's education department in Israel's far north, taught by Dr. Tamar Hagar. The program includes four courses: Education and the community; Critical thought, gender and activism; Human rights – leadership and change; and Jewish-Arab dialogue. In addition to these academic courses, students volunteer for four hours a week at formal and informal educational initiatives, including a new community center for the Southern Lebanese community in Kiryat Shmona, the Tel Hai center for developing readiness for higher education among disadvantaged groups, a project for helping women in Kiryat Shmone find employment facilitated by the Yedid organization, a kindergarten for autistic children, and more.
 

Informal Education and Social Change

Dr. Dalya Markovich and Dr. Hagit Kilvansky
Program for Community Organizing and Administration, Beit Berl College
The course aims to form a connection between the field of non-formal education and active civic engagement. It discussed the non-formal education field as a potential sphere for civic activism and social change, and the different ways in which non-formal education leverages diverse social action and human rights. The experience in the field is designed to provide students with tools and skills for civic activism. The theoretical and practical study is intended to reflect and analyze some of the dilemmas, contradictions and new horizons characterizing this distinct sphere.
The classroom consists of Jewish and Palestinian faculty and students, who through joint action and study throughout the year learn to bridge over initial differences and work together towards a common goal.
 

Art and Activism

Eldad Cidour, Lea Mauas, Diego Rotman and Eytan Shouker
Bezalel – Academy of Art and Design
This popular course at the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design is taught by Eytan Shouker, Eldad Cidor, Lea Mauas and Diego Rotman. Between 20 and 32 students will be enrolled in the course this year. Throughout the year the students study the work of artist activists, discuss art in the social, political and economic contexts, and meet local organizations, activists, and artists. In the summer, each student devotes approximately 180 hours to developing a new or ongoing project in conjunction with a local community. Examples of such projects include creating areas for meeting and leisure in the village of Issawiah through recycling projects, building a platform for open conversation between city residents in the center of Jerusalem, and planning and developing a park in an area that was initially designated as a major road.
 

Teaching Geometry in Social and Cultural Context

Prof. Daoud Bshouty, Dr. Igor Verner and Khiria Massarwe
Faculty of Education in Technology and Science, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology
Eight students are enrolled in this course, offered by the Dept. of Education in Technology and Science at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, and taught by Dr. Igor Verner and Prof. Daoud Bashouty of the Technion's faculty of mathematics. In the course students study and experience geometry teaching through geometric patterns of cultural significance. Students study Indian, Aztec, Ancient Roman, Jewish, Muslim and Christian geometric art and how such art can be used to teach geometry. In addition to their studies, students volunteer for four hours a week teaching and creating geometric art with Jewish and Arab students, to increase young people's interest in studying geometry, and to promote inter-cultural understanding through geometry and art.
 
Legal Feminism and Social Change
Adv. Dana Myrtenbaum, Odette Falach and Dr. Noya Rimalt
Faculty of Law, Haifa University
The program is a unique cooperation between the Haifa University’s Faculty of law and Itach-Maaki – Women Lawyers for Social Justice, a Jewish-Arab feminist legal advocacy organization. The program’s vision is to promote access to justice for women from disadvantaged communities and marginalized individuals, as well as to challenge the existing power structure in the legal world and its gender and cultural blindness. Through this unique program Jewish and Arab law students have the opportunity to openly and critically engage with questions of intergroup relations, power, and accessibility.
The program aspires to impact future lawyers by exposing Jewish and Arab law students at the University of Haifa to women’s struggles and strength, and to the power of the law in the process of social change. Along with the law students, a group of Arab and Jewish women from marginalized communities go through an empowerment process as they are trained to be “legal leaders” whose voices will be heard in the public sphere and who are committee to issues of gender and status shared by all marginalized Israeli women.
Pairing together women leaders and law students, the program’s participants act together in designing and implementing seed projects to enable marginalized voices of women and disempowered communities to be heard and seen by decision-makers, the legal system, courts, media, the general public and more. The model, co-coordinated by a Jewish attorney and an Arab-Druze psychologist, equips a multi-cultural group of women activists and law students with effective social change tools and guides them in their quest for long term social change.
Projects developed by the program include: empowering Arab and Jewish women in providing legal assistance by making accessible the Family Court in Haifa; promoting and advancing the rights of Arab-Druze women in the divorce process; construction of a rehabilitation program for women involved in prostitution and raising public awareness to their situation, and more.
 

Legal Clinic for Representation of Youth

Adv. Sharon Sionov Arad
Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
19 students are enrolled in this course, which is offered by the Law Faculty at Hebrew University and taught by attorneys Sharon Zionov, Reut Rosner and Shiran Reichenberg. Through this course law students gain practical experience in representing youth and in providing legal aid and representation. Students study a range of topics including legal aspects in the lives of children and youth, how bureaucratic systems treat young people, how social gaps and inequality affect the lives of youth, children and young people as a disadvantaged group, international aspects of children's rights, and more. Students commit to working at the clinic between 6-10 hours a week, staffing the clinic, providing representation, conducting workshops and marketing the clinic to young people. The clinic works with a range of social organizations as well as with governmental and non-governmental agencies and the Israeli courts.
 
Community Interpreting
Prof. Miriam Shlesinger and Dr. Michal Schuster
Department of Translation and Interpreting Studies, Bar-Ilan University 
The course in community interpreting trains bilingual students to leverage their knowledge of a second language for the benefit of those who have difficulty accessing various public services because they do not speak Hebrew. It addresses such issues as the role of language in creating – and reducing – power imbalances, the ethics of intercultural mediation, advocacy and empowerment, and the rights o language minorities in a multilingual society.

Students – speakers of Arabic, Russian, Amharic, Spanish, French and English (in addition to Hebrew) – spend 4 hours each week volunteering as language mediators (translator/interpreters). Their assignments vary widely and include hospitals (primarily mediating between Arabic-speaking patients, many of them from Gaza, and the medical staff); rehabilitational facilities (assisting therapists in diagnosing and treating children who have undergone trauma); NGOs (such as Physicians for Human Rights); well baby clinics; immigration center; and municipal services and social security offices. The students’ language skills are curial in easing tension in these very charged settings and promote an understanding of the importance of language access, while enhancing public awareness of language in the context of human rights. Importantly, the course brings together students from a variety of backgrounds, many of whom have never been exposed to the other before. As a result the students undergo an intense process of tolerance building, understanding, and transformation of previously hostile relationships.

  
Rights of the Palestinian Arab Minority in Israel
Dr. Yousef Jabareen and Dr. Ilan Saban
Faculty of Law, Haifa University
The course examines the legal status of the Arab citizens of Israel, and questions the capacity of the law to serve s a tool for social change. Its framework creates a setting for Arab-Jewish student partnership, modeled by the course lecturers. Students in the course create Arab and Jewish work teams. Student intern and aid six human rights organizations advancing the status of the Palestinian minority in Israel.
The faculty members, course coordinator and representatives of the organizations outline students’ projects in advance, to ensure that they address key issues, while the course aims to imitate at least one independent project annually. Students in the course have been assisting in the preparation of an appeal regarding the conditions for admittance to institutions of higher education. Today, universities and colleges require an arbitrary minimal age that predominantly discriminates against Arab citizens. A team of students has been working on the preparation of an appeal regarding profiling in public places, which results in discrimination based on nationality. Other teams have been working to connect school sin the unrecognized villages of the Negev to electricity and running water, and have begun to draft an appeal regarding discrimination practices in acceptance to newly established community settlements in the Negev.
 

The Artist as an Agent of Change

Dr. Michael Klinghoffer
Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance
Students travel every two weeks to work with children and teenagers at conservatories or community centers at several locations: Ofakim, Merhavim, Yokneam, Migdal, Eshkol and Jerusalem. In addition, concentrated activity days are held during each year in Jerusalem. The students work with the children individually as well as in groups, guiding them in several music ensembles and in different styles – rock, jazz, and classical. They contribute to the growth of the community centers and conservatories. The program works to create a community of musicians, encompassing students, children, teenagers, and music professionals. It aims to change the discourse at the peripherally located music centers and community centers with which the program is implemented, to lead towards discourse of excellence, and embody an encounter for children and youth with higher education. The program's premise is that the encounter of students participating in the course with youth at peripheral areas will change the youth's outlook on musical studies, and their access to certain methods and knowledge. It hopes to change their perception of themselves as musicians, inspire in them confidence and passion for music.  
 

Citizen Artists in a Community of Immigrants

Dr. Shulamith Lev-Alagem and Rimona Lappin
Department of Theatre Arts, Tel-Aviv University
This course combines theory with practice and provides an advanced model for community-based theatre. The course invites students from the theatre department as well as from other departments and schools all over the university. The aim of the course is to train citizen-artists. A citizen-artist is a committed artist who chooses to create in, for and with a given community. The encounter between the citizen-artist and the community generates a cultural intervention, which combines art with action, aesthetics with pragmatism, and social involvement with intentions to produce change.
 

Green Engineering

Dr. Adi Wolfson and Dr. Dorit Tavor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Shamoon College of Engineering
 

Active Involvement of Education Students in Women's Rights Organziations

Dr. Nira Reiss and Ornat Turin
Communications Department, Gordon College of Education
School-teaching today requires a democratic attitude as well as leadership skills. One of the primary goals of teacher training programs is to empower future teachers by promoting autonomous thinking andpractical contributions to an egalitarian society. Teachers have a crucial role as agents of socialization of young girls and boys. The importance of empowering teachers as women, combined with the role of these teachers in gender education, lead us to look for ways to engage women students of education with feminist thinking and practice,as part of their training.
The course will involve a group of education students at Gordon School of Education inHaifain the activities of women's grass-roots organizations working for women's rights, in order to familiarize these students with the principles of the women's liberation movement in the 21st century, to empower them as women, as teachers and as citizens, and to broaden their understanding of social change. The course is designed for third and fourth year students and will include theoretical aspects of human rights and of feminism alongside guided volunteer work in one of the women's organizations.
The students will volunteer in one of the following organizations in Haifa:
The Shelters for Victims of Domestic Abuse, Isha Le-isha (Woman to Woman) Center, Kayan, and Itach-Maaki. Guest speakers from these organizations will introduce their organizations during the first few sessions of the course.

Courses 2008-2009

Gender and Human Rights – Between Criminology, Victimology and Social Action

Dr. Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian
Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Fourteen students enrolled in this innovative course, jointly offered by the School of Social Work and the Criminology Department at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and taught by Dr. Katalin Katz and Dr. Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian. The course integrates theoretical study of human rights advocacy methods and critical concepts with four hours of volunteering at a range of governmental and non-governmental organizations, including the Association for Civil Rights in Israel, the Jerusalem municipality, the Israel Association for Child Protection, Elem – Youth in Distress, and more. Some of the projects in which the students are involved include: workshops for women on sexual rights, coordination of a coalition of organizations on the protection of children on the internet, advocacy for Sudanese refugees, and more.

Human Rights, Community, and Planning Policy in Israel 

Dr. Haim Yacobi
Department of Politics and Government, Ben Gurion University
Twelve students are enrolled in this course, offered by the politics and government department at Ben Gurion University in Beer Sheva and taught by Dr. Haim Yacobi. The course highlights the connection between human rights as a concept and a tool for social change, and planning policy as a practice engaged in organization of space and allocation of resources. In addition to their coursework, students volunteer for at least five hours a week at a human rights or social justice organization, culminating in an analysis or policy document that they write for the organization. The course places special emphasis on disadvantaged communities in the south of Israel and issues of employment, environment, and health.
 

Education with a View Towards the Community

Dr. Tamar Hagar, Adv. Yael Efron, Tufaha Saba and Nava Shay
Department of Education, Tel-Hai Academic College
Fourteen students are enrolled in this program at Tel Hai College's education department in Israel's far north, taught by Dr. Tamar Hagar. The program includes four courses: Education and the community; Critical thought, gender and activism; Human rights – leadership and change; and Jewish-Arab dialogue. In addition to these academic courses, students volunteer for four hours a week at formal and informal educational initiatives, including a new community center for the Southern Lebanese community in Kiryat Shmona, the Tel Hai center for developing readiness for higher education among disadvantaged groups, a project for helping women in Kiryat Shmone find employment facilitated by the Yedid organization, a kindergarten for autistic children, and more.
 

Education and Social Change

Dr. Dalya Markovich 
Informal Education Track, Beit Berl College
The course aims to form a connection between the field of non-formal education and active civic engagement. It discussed the non-formal education field as a potential sphere for civic activism and social change, and the different ways in which non-formal education leverages diverse social action and human rights. The experience in the field is designed to provide students with tools and skills for civic activism. The theoretical and practical study is intended to reflect and analyze some of the dilemmas, contradictions and new horizons characterizing this distinct sphere.
The classroom consists of Jewish and Palestinian faculty and students, who through joint action and study throughout the year learn to bridge over initial differences and work together towards a common goal.
 

Art and Activism

Eldad Cidour, Lea Mauas, Diego Rotman and Eytan Shouker
Bezalel – Academy of Art and Design
This popular course at the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design is taught by Eytan Shouker, Eldad Cidor, Lea Mauas and Diego Rotman. Between 20 and 32 students will be enrolled in the course this year. Throughout the year the students study the work of artist activists, discuss art in the social, political and economic contexts, and meet local organizations, activists, and artists. In the summer, each student devotes approximately 180 hours to developing a new or ongoing project in conjunction with a local community. Examples of such projects include creating areas for meeting and leisure in the village of Issawiah through recycling projects, building a platform for open conversation between city residents in the center of Jerusalem, and planning and developing a park in an area that was initially designated as a major road.
 

Teaching Geometry in Social and Cultural Context

Prof. Daoud Bshouty, Dr. Igor Verner and Khiria Massarwe
Faculty of Education in Technology and Science, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology
Eight students are enrolled in this course, offered by the Dept. of Education in Technology and Science at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, and taught by Dr. Igor Verner and Prof. Daoud Bashouty of the Technion's faculty of mathematics. In the course students study and experience geometry teaching through geometric patterns of cultural significance. Students study Indian, Aztec, Ancient Roman, Jewish, Muslim and Christian geometric art and how such art can be used to teach geometry. In addition to their studies, students volunteer for four hours a week teaching and creating geometric art with Jewish and Arab students, to increase young people's interest in studying geometry, and to promote inter-cultural understanding through geometry and art.
 
Legal Feminism and Social Change
Adv. Dana Myrtenbaum, Odette Falach and Dr. Noya Rimalt
Faculty of Law, Haifa University
The program is a unique cooperation between the Haifa University’s Faculty of law and Itach-Maaki – Women Lawyers for Social Justice, a Jewish-Arab feminist legal advocacy organization. The program’s vision is to promote access to justice for women from disadvantaged communities and marginalized individuals, as well as to challenge the existing power structure in the legal world and its gender and cultural blindness. Through this unique program Jewish and Arab law students have the opportunity to openly and critically engage with questions of intergroup relations, power, and accessibility.
The program aspires to impact future lawyers by exposing Jewish and Arab law students at the University of Haifa to women’s struggles and strength, and to the power of the law in the process of social change. Along with the law students, a group of Arab and Jewish women from marginalized communities go through an empowerment process as they are trained to be “legal leaders” whose voices will be heard in the public sphere and who are committee to issues of gender and status shared by all marginalized Israeli women.
Pairing together women leaders and law students, the program’s participants act together in designing and implementing seed projects to enable marginalized voices of women and disempowered communities to be heard and seen by decision-makers, the legal system, courts, media, the general public and more. The model, co-coordinated by a Jewish attorney and an Arab-Druze psychologist, equips a multi-cultural group of women activists and law students with effective social change tools and guides them in their quest for long term social change.
Projects developed by the program include: empowering Arab and Jewish women in providing legal assistance by making accessible the Family Court in Haifa; promoting and advancing the rights of Arab-Druze women in the divorce process; construction of a rehabilitation program for women involved in prostitution and raising public awareness to their situation, and more.
 

Legal Clinic for Representation of Youth

Adv. Sharon Sionov Arad
Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
19 students are enrolled in this course, which is offered by the Law Faculty at Hebrew University and taught by attorneys Sharon Zionov, Reut Rosner and Shiran Reichenberg. Through this course law students gain practical experience in representing youth and in providing legal aid and representation. Students study a range of topics including legal aspects in the lives of children and youth, how bureaucratic systems treat young people, how social gaps and inequality affect the lives of youth, children and young people as a disadvantaged group, international aspects of children's rights, and more. Students commit to working at the clinic between 6-10 hours a week, staffing the clinic, providing representation, conducting workshops and marketing the clinic to young people. The clinic works with a range of social organizations as well as with governmental and non-governmental agencies and the Israeli courts.
 
Community Interpreting
Prof. Miriam Shlesinger and Dr. Michal Schuster
Department of Translation and Interpreting Studies, Bar-Ilan University
The course in community interpreting trains bilingual students to leverage their knowledge of a second language for the benefit of those who have difficulty accessing various public services because they do not speak Hebrew. It addresses such issues as the role of language in creating – and reducing – power imbalances, the ethics of intercultural mediation, advocacy and empowerment, and the rights o language minorities in a multilingual society.

Students – speakers of Arabic, Russian, Amharic, Spanish, French and English (in addition to Hebrew) – spend 4 hours each week volunteering as language mediators (translator/interpreters). Their assignments vary widely and include hospitals (primarily mediating between Arabic-speaking patients, many of them from Gaza, and the medical staff); rehabilitational facilities (assisting therapists in diagnosing and treating children who have undergone trauma); NGOs (such as Physicians for Human Rights); well baby clinics; immigration center; and municipal services and social security offices. The students’ language skills are curial in easing tension in these very charged settings and promote an understanding of the importance of language access, while enhancing public awareness of language in the context of human rights. Importantly, the course brings together students from a variety of backgrounds, many of whom have never been exposed to the other before. As a result the students undergo an intense process of tolerance building, understanding, and transformation of previously hostile relationships.

 

Human Rights and the Israeli Society

Dr. Daphna Golan
Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Founded in 1999, this course brings together fifteen graduate and undergraduate students from a range of academic departments, who are interested in and committed to human rights. The students participate in a bi-weekly seminar that integrates theoretical study with ten hours of weekly volunteering at a human rights organization. The course reviews various aspects of human rights in Israeli society with an emphasis on the role of human rights organizations on processes of change. The first part of the course discusses the universality of human rights: international conventions, international enforcement mechanisms, and international human rights NGOs. The next, central part of the course focuses on human rights in Israel: security needs vs. human rights, rights of the Arab minority, women's rights, children's rights, rights of people with disabilities, foreign worker rights, and human rights in the Occupied Territories.
 
Rights of the Palestinian Arab Minority in Israel
Dr. Yousef Jabareen and Dr. Ilan Saban
Faculty of Law, Haifa University
The course examines the legal status of the Arab citizens of Israel, and questions the capacity of the law to serve s a tool for social change. Its framework creates a setting for Arab-Jewish student partnership, modeled by the course lecturers. Students in the course create Arab and Jewish work teams. Student intern and aid six human rights organizations advancing the status of the Palestinian minority in Israel.
The faculty members, course coordinator and representatives of the organizations outline students’ projects in advance, to ensure that they address key issues, while the course aims to imitate at least one independent project annually. Students in the course have been assisting in the preparation of an appeal regarding the conditions for admittance to institutions of higher education. Today, universities and colleges require an arbitrary minimal age that predominantly discriminates against Arab citizens. A team of students has been working on the preparation of an appeal regarding profiling in public places, which results in discrimination based on nationality. Other teams have been working to connect school sin the unrecognized villages of the Negev to electricity and running water, and have begun to draft an appeal regarding discrimination practices in acceptance to newly established community settlements in the Negev.
 

The Artist as an Agent of Change

Dr. Michael Klinghoffer
Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance
Students travel every two weeks to work with children and teenagers at conservatories or community centers at several locations: Ofakim, Merhavim, Yokneam, Migdal, Eshkol and Jerusalem. In addition, concentrated activity days are held during each year in Jerusalem. The students work with the children individually as well as in groups, guiding them in several music ensembles and in different styles – rock, jazz, and classical. They contribute to the growth of the community centers and conservatories. The program works to create a community of musicians, encompassing students, children, teenagers, and music professionals. It aims to change the discourse at the peripherally located music centers and community centers with which the program is implemented, to lead towards discourse of excellence, and embody an encounter for children and youth with higher education. The program's premise is that the encounter of students participating in the course with youth at peripheral areas will change the youth's outlook on musical studies, and their access to certain methods and knowledge. It hopes to change their perception of themselves as musicians, inspire in them confidence and passion for music.
 

Marginalized Populations, Human Rights and Social Change

Dr. Edith Blit-Cohen
School of Social Work, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
This course deals with civil and social rights and the relationship between the violation of human rights and the creation of social exclusion, exploitation and oppression. During the course, the students examine the phenomenon of social exclusion among different groups. In addition, the course deals with different ways of combating social exclusion, such as community organizing, consciousness raising and social change. A special part of the course is dedicated to discussing the relevance and the role of social workers in creating responses for socially excluded persons at the different levels of intervention: the micro , the mezzo, and the macro level. Throughout the course, students become engaged with civil society organizations concerned with socio-economic gaps, with an emphasis on Jews and Palestinians in Israel.
 

Education for Social Justice, Environmental Justice and Peace Education

Haggith Gor Ziv, Galia Zalmanson Levi and Gal Harmat
Center for Critical Pedagogy and Education for Social Justice, Kibbutzim College of Education
This teachers’ training program of four years for B.Ed aims at building the teachers’ capacity to educate children toward social justice and peace, raising their awareness to gender inequalities and other forms of discrimination in education. The students practical training is performed in organizations for social change, and in schools at disadvantaged communities, including Jewish-Arab student activist organization Mahapach-Taghir, Arab-Jewish projects in Jaffa, and the Jewish and Arab Women’s Association in Rosh Ha’Ayin. Students are required to implement ideas of alternative education, and innovative relevant pedagogy for children from marginalized groups.
The group of students participating in the program reflects in itself the various segments of Israeli society and provides an unparalleled space for intergroup dialogue – Palestinian and Jewish, migrant workers, disabled students, young and old, from the center and from the periphery. Students speak seven different languages and affiliate with four religions. The program offers courses on Israeli society, human rights and children’s’ rights, gender equality, critical pedagogy, and more. In addition the students specialize in one educational discipline – math, science, literature and language and Jewish and Arab culture. They are taught how to integrate social justice and peace education into the existing required curricula.
 

Leadership and Social Change – Awareness and Initiative in Public Action

Dr. Ariela Bairey Ben Ishay and Moti Gigi
Public Policy and Public Administration Department, Sapir College 
This course deals with two main issues, on both theoretical and practical-experiential levels: individual and social change in a diverse and changing society, and social initiative and leadership. The course exposes the students to mainstream and innovative approaches to leadership as social action that occurs in a historical, social and political context. The course examines leadership as aprocess that takes place from the bottom-up and laterally, and not only from the top-down. This approach allows every individual in the room to actively examine his or her ethnic and national identities and take responsibility for who they are as members of their social and political environments. Students learn to use their strengths, privileges and shortcomings as they better understand their role in either perpetuating or interrupting social processes, and learn to take action as conscious and responsible agents of social change.
The method of instruction is engaged-critical pedagogy, in which students are challenged to read diverse theoretical approaches, respond to them and interact actively with each other on intellectual-cognitive and personal-emotional levels. As students participate in eh course and are active in organizations for social justice and human rights, the course staff offers a forum for reflection in action, within which consciousness, awareness and action are encouraged as a flexible process of orchestrating group resources, as processes of individual and social change are underway.

Courses 2009-2010

Refugee Issues in Israel and the World – Theory and Practical Training

Prof. Vered Slonim-Nevo and Yiftah Milo
School of Social Work, Ben Gurion University of the Negev

The course is an interdisciplinary introduction to refugee issues in Israel and the world. It examines legal, political, historical, sociological and psychological issues related to refugees as expressed in Africa and in Israel and other Western countries. In addition, the course examines Israeli policy towards refugees and asylum seekers who come to Israel seeking protection. The course takes place on the university’s campus in the city of Eilat, home to 2500 asylum seekers, and is open to students in social work, behavioral sciences, sociology, tourism, and politics.

In addition to their theoretical study students work one day a week with refugee children and families in the city of Eilat. The course will be carried out in cooperation with civil society organizations providing aid and support to refugees.

 

Leadership and Social Change: Awareness and Initiative in Public Action

Dr. Ariela Bairey, Dr. Daniel Malach, and Moti Gigi
Dept. of Public Policy and Administration, Sapir Academic College, Sderot
This course deals with two main issues, on both theoretical and practical-experiential levels: individual and social change in a diverse and changing society, and social initiative and leadership. The course exposes the students to mainstream and innovative approaches to leadership as social action that occurs in a historical, social and political context. The course examines leadership as aprocess that takes place from the bottom-up and laterally, and not only from the top-down. This approach allows every individual in the room to actively examine his or her ethnic and national identities and take responsibility for who they are as members of their social and political environments. Students learn to use their strengths, privileges and shortcomings as they better understand their role in either perpetuating or interrupting social processes, and learn to take action as conscious and responsible agents of social change.
The method of instruction is engaged-critical pedagogy, in which students are challenged to read diverse theoretical approaches, respond to them and interact actively with each other on intellectual-cognitive and personal-emotional levels. As students participate in eh course and are active in organizations for social justice and human rights, the course staff offers a forum for reflection in action, within which consciousness, awareness and action are encouraged as a flexible process of orchestrating group resources, as processes of individual and social change are underway.
 

Environmental Justice in a Trans-boundary Space

Adv. Yuval Laster, Dr. Itay Fischhendler, and Prof. Yigal Erel
The Faculty of Law, the Department of Geography, and the Program for Environmental Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Environmental problems do not recognize manmade borders. Thus, despite the attempts to transfer many of Jewish West-Jerusalem’s environmental problems (e.g. waste dumps etc.) to Palestinian East Jerusalem, the problems have a grave impact on both sides. The objective of the course is twofold: to strengthen the conditions for cooperation and long term environmental planning across boundaries in Jerusalem and empowering marginalized stakeholders, while at the same time educating students for social responsibility and action through interdisciplinary use of scientific, planning, and legal tools. Through this joint work students from various disciplines can learn about each other’s strengths and limitations and lay the foundation for future cooperation. Students will be involved in projects that encourage alternatives for waste dumping and promote recycling, file lawsuits as necessary, work with planning groups at the Jerusalem municipality, meet with residents to document their needs, etc.
 

Feminism, Accessibility and the Law

Orly Kuzin-Malachi and Shiran Reichenberg
Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
The course examines the conditions of marginalized women in various sectors of Israeli society, their legal status as workers, mothers, single mothers and partners, and in legal, feminist, and marginalization theories. Israeli society is diverse and consists of groups with varying characteristics and traditions. Many women come from traditional backgrounds which is reflected in their status in religious costs. The course will examine the connections between knowledge, accessibility to law, marginal communities and social rights, and the direct and indirect obstacles that women and girls face when seeking to exercise their rights. The course will study various groups of marginalized women: in Islamic polygamy, the traditional Arab family and society in East Jerusalem, the family structure of the Ethiopian community, and the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community. Students will volunteer six hors a week at shelters for girls, social welfare agencies in East Jerusalem, employment agencies for Arab women, battered women shelters for Arab women, and more.
Jewish and Arab law students will initiate and pursue community work with marginalized women and girls through conducting empowerment workshops and development of a community project. Jewish and Arab women from marginalized communities will be hosted at the Hebrew University Campus to expose them to the academic environment.
 

Marginalized Populations, Human Rights and Social Change

Dr. Edith Blit-Cohen
School of Social Work, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
This course deals with civil and social rights and the relationship between the violation of human rights and the creation of social exclusion, exploitation and oppression. During the course, the students examine the phenomenon of social exclusion among different groups. In addition, the course deals with different ways of combating social exclusion, such as community organizing, consciousness raising and social change. A special part of the course is dedicated to discussing the relevance and the role of social workers in creating responses for socially excluded persons at the different levels of intervention: the micro , the mezzo, and the macro level. Throughout the course, students become engaged with civil society organizations concerned with socio-economic gaps, with an emphasis on Jews and Palestinians in Israel.
 

The Unit for (In)formal Architecture Studies

Senan Abd-Elkader and Yael Padan
School of Architecture, Bezalel Academy of Art and Design

One of the central features of Israel’s built landscape is informal construction, that circumvents the legal, planning, and execution requirements of formal building. Such a phenomenon is typical of marginalized populations globally, who for various reasons are barred from using the accepted system. The unit for (in)formal architecture studies examines these phenomena and its effect on the landscape of our lives. We are interested in how such construction expresses the relationships between the powerful and the powerless. The objective of the course is to train future architects who are aware of the existence and complexity of the informal building phenomenon. Students will aim to create meaningful architecture through dialogue with Palestinian residents of East Jerusalem in consideration of the social and cultural complexity of the existing built landscape. The course will be conducted in cooperation with Bimkom – Planners for Planning Rights, and the legal clinic at Al-Kuds University.

For the website of the Unit for (In)Formal Architecture, press here.

 

Art and Activism

Eldad Cidour, Lea Mauas, Diego Rotman and Eytan Shouker
Bezalel – Academy of Art and Design
This popular course at the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design is taught by Eytan Shouker, Eldad Cidor, Lea Mauas and Diego Rotman. Between 20 and 32 students will be enrolled in the course this year. Throughout the year the students study the work of artist activists, discuss art in the social, political and economic contexts, and meet local organizations, activists, and artists. In the summer, each student devotes approximately 180 hours to developing a new or ongoing project in conjunction with a local community. Examples of such projects include creating areas for meeting and leisure in the village of Issawiah through recycling projects, building a platform for open conversation between city residents in the center of Jerusalem, and planning and developing a park in an area that was initially designated as a major road.
 

Community Art Workshop in the A-Tur Neighborhood

Miki Kratzman and Chen Shapira
Bezalel Academy of Art and Design

The course's main objective is to spur among the students awareness and acknowledgement of the human, social and political reality that surrounds them. It seeks to provide them with skills and tools for understanding and acting in the public sphere, expand the perceived role of the artist and of art itself, and broaden the perception of art and photography as a discourse. The course raises questions relating to human rights, and place, and questions relating to art in the social, political and human context. It is based on dialogue with the residents of Sheikh Jarrah in Jerusalem, researching the stories of the residents and the manner in which group narratives are constructed, and how they may change and influence the public sphere.

In the course students receive theoretical background preparation, following which they work with the residents and families of Sheikh Jarrah. The students research the stories, learn about the neighborhood through different means of documentation and observation, form visual dialogue with the residents, and organize a concluding exhibit that includes a screening and sharing of materials in the community.  

For the website of the Sheikh Jarrah Project, press here.

 

The Artist as an Agent of Change

Dr. Michael Klinghoffer and Anna Shapira
Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance
Students travel every two weeks to work with children and teenagers at conservatories or community centers at several locations: Ofakim, Merhavim, Yokneam, Migdal, Eshkol and Jerusalem. In addition, concentrated activity days are held during each year in Jerusalem. The students work with the children individually as well as in groups, guiding them in several music ensembles and in different styles – rock, jazz, and classical. They contribute to the growth of the community centers and conservatories. The program works to create a community of musicians, encompassing students, children, teenagers, and music professionals. It aims to change the discourse at the peripherally located music centers and community centers with which the program is implemented, to lead towards discourse of excellence, and embody an encounter for children and youth with higher education. The program's premise is that the encounter of students participating in the course with youth at peripheral areas will change the youth's outlook on musical studies, and their access to certain methods and knowledge. It hopes to change their perception of themselves as musicians, inspire in them confidence and passion for music.
 

Human Rights and the Israeli Society

Dr. Daphna Golan and Amany Khalefa
Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Founded in 1999, this course brings together fifteen graduate and undergraduate students from a range of academic departments, who are interested in and committed to human rights. The students participate in a bi-weekly seminar that integrates theoretical study with ten hours of weekly volunteering at a human rights organization. The course reviews various aspects of human rights in Israeli society with an emphasis on the role of human rights organizations on processes of change. The first part of the course discusses the universality of human rights: international conventions, international enforcement mechanisms, and international human rights NGOs. The next, central part of the course focuses on human rights in Israel: security needs vs. human rights, rights of the Arab minority, women's rights, children's rights, rights of people with disabilities, foreign worker rights, and human rights in the Occupied Territories.
 

Education and Social Change

Dr. Dalya Markovich and Asmhan Hazrallah
School of Education, Beit Berl College
The course aims to form a connection between the field of non-formal education and active civic engagement. It discussed the non-formal education field as a potential sphere for civic activism and social change, and the different ways in which non-formal education leverages diverse social action and human rights. The experience in the field is designed to provide students with tools and skills for civic activism. The theoretical and practical study is intended to reflect and analyze some of the dilemmas, contradictions and new horizons characterizing this distinct sphere.
The classroom consists of Jewish and Palestinian faculty and students, who through joint action and study throughout the year learn to bridge over initial differences and work together towards a common goal.
 

Education for Social Justice, Environmental Justice and Peace Education

Hagith Gor Ziv, Galia Zalmansson and Gal Harmat
Kibbutzim College of Education
This teachers’ training program of four years for B.Ed aims at building the teachers’ capacity to educate children toward social justice and peace, raising their awareness to gender inequalities and other forms of discrimination in education. The students practical training is performed in organizations for social change, and in schools at disadvantaged communities, including Jewish-Arab student activist organization Mahapach-Taghir, Arab-Jewish projects in Jaffa, and the Jewish and Arab Women’s Association in Rosh Ha’Ayin. Students are required to implement ideas of alternative education, and innovative relevant pedagogy for children from marginalized groups.
The group of students participating in the program reflects in itself the various segments of Israeli society and provides an unparalleled space for intergroup dialogue – Palestinian and Jewish, migrant workers, disabled students, young and old, from the center and from the periphery. Students speak seven different languages and affiliate with four religions. The program offers courses on Israeli society, human rights and children’s’ rights, gender equality, critical pedagogy, and more. In addition the students specialize in one educational discipline – math, science, literature and language and Jewish and Arab culture. They are taught how to integrate social justice and peace education into the existing required curricula.
 

Community Interpreting

Prof. Miriam Shlesinger, Tania Winova and Dr. Michal Schuster
Dept. of Translation and Interpreting Studies, Bar Ilan University
The course in community interpreting trains bilingual students to leverage their knowledge of a second language for the benefit of those who have difficulty accessing various public services because they do not speak Hebrew. It addresses such issues as the role of language in creating – and reducing – power imbalances, the ethics of intercultural mediation, advocacy and empowerment, and the rights o language minorities in a multilingual society.

Students – speakers of Arabic, Russian, Amharic, Spanish, French and English (in addition to Hebrew) – spend 4 hours each week volunteering as language mediators (translator/interpreters). Their assignments vary widely and include hospitals (primarily mediating between Arabic-speaking patients, many of them from Gaza, and the medical staff); rehabilitational facilities (assisting therapists in diagnosing and treating children who have undergone trauma); NGOs (such as Physicians for Human Rights); well baby clinics; immigration center; and municipal services and social security offices. The students’ language skills are curial in easing tension in these very charged settings and promote an understanding of the importance of language access, while enhancing public awareness of language in the context of human rights. Importantly, the course brings together students from a variety of backgrounds, many of whom have never been exposed to the other before. As a result the students undergo an intense process of tolerance building, understanding, and transformation of previously hostile relationships.

Planning, Sustainability and Human Rights: Theory and Practice – The Right to Adequate Housing in Jaffa Gimel

Prof. Tovi Fenster and Tal Kulka
Dept. of Geography and Human Environment, Tel Aviv University

The course is a graduate course for students specializing in urban planning as part of their graduate studies at the Dept. of Geography and Human Environment. The course is also open to students from other departments including architecture, environmental studies, law, public policy, and management. The course is part of a growing research and teaching program at the Laboratory for Planning, Environment, and Community Studies. The lab aims to connect academic study with the community through student research projects, the establishment of an interactive website for the use of various communities, and conferences and study days focusing on human rights, justice and equality in the areas of planning and development.

For the Laboratory for Planning for the Environment with Communities website, press here.

 

Education With a View Towards the Community

Dr. Tamar Hagar, Adv. Yael Efron, Tufaha Saba and Nava Shay
Department of Education, Tel-Hai Academic College
Fourteen students are enrolled in this program at Tel Hai College's education department in Israel's far north, taught by Dr. Tamar Hagar. The program includes four courses: Education and the community; Critical thought, gender and activism; Human rights – leadership and change; and Jewish-Arab dialogue. In addition to these academic courses, students volunteer for four hours a week at formal and informal educational initiatives, including a new community center for the Southern Lebanese community in Kiryat Shmona, the Tel Hai center for developing readiness for higher education among disadvantaged groups, a project for helping women in Kiryat Shmone find employment facilitated by the Yedid organization, a kindergarten for autistic children, and more.
 

Rights of the Palestinian Arab Minority in Israel 

Dr. Yousef Jabareen and Dr. Ilan Saban
Faculty of Law, University of Haifa
The course examines the legal status of the Arab citizens of Israel, and questions the capacity of the law to serve s a tool for social change. Its framework creates a setting for Arab-Jewish student partnership, modeled by the course lecturers. Students in the course create Arab and Jewish work teams. Student intern and aid six human rights organizations advancing the status of the Palestinian minority in Israel.
The faculty members, course coordinator and representatives of the organizations outline students’ projects in advance, to ensure that they address key issues, while the course aims to imitate at least one independent project annually. Students in the course have been assisting in the preparation of an appeal regarding the conditions for admittance to institutions of higher education. Today, universities and colleges require an arbitrary minimal age that predominantly discriminates against Arab citizens. A team of students has been working on the preparation of an appeal regarding profiling in public places, which results in discrimination based on nationality. Other teams have been working to connect school sin the unrecognized villages of the Negev to electricity and running water, and have begun to draft an appeal regarding discrimination practices in acceptance to newly established community settlements in the Negev.
 

Legal Feminism and Social Change

Adv. Dana Myrtenbaum, Noor Falach and Dr. Sagit Mor
Law School, the Haifa Legal Feminism Clinic, University of Haifa
The program is a unique cooperation between the Haifa University’s Faculty of law and Itach-Maaki – Women Lawyers for Social Justice, a Jewish-Arab feminist legal advocacy organization. The program’s vision is to promote access to justice for women from disadvantaged communities and marginalized individuals, as well as to challenge the existing power structure in the legal world and its gender and cultural blindness. Through this unique program Jewish and Arab law students have the opportunity to openly and critically engage with questions of intergroup relations, power, and accessibility.
The program aspires to impact future lawyers by exposing Jewish and Arab law students at the University of Haifa to women’s struggles and strength, and to the power of the law in the process of social change. Along with the law students, a group of Arab and Jewish women from marginalized communities go through an empowerment process as they are trained to be “legal leaders” whose voices will be heard in the public sphere and who are committee to issues of gender and status shared by all marginalized Israeli women.
Pairing together women leaders and law students, the program’s participants act together in designing and implementing seed projects to enable marginalized voices of women and disempowered communities to be heard and seen by decision-makers, the legal system, courts, media, the general public and more. The model, co-coordinated by a Jewish attorney and an Arab-Druze psychologist, equips a multi-cultural group of women activists and law students with effective social change tools and guides them in their quest for long term social change.
Projects developed by the program include: empowering Arab and Jewish women in providing legal assistance by making accessible the Family Court in Haifa; promoting and advancing the rights of Arab-Druze women in the divorce process; construction of a rehabilitation program for women involved in prostitution and raising public awareness to their situation, and more.
 

Methods for Community Organizing: The Haifa Partnership for the Eradication of Poverty

Dr. Roni Strier
School of Social Work, University of Haifa
This course examines the community strategies to combat poverty and aims to create an equal partnership between the academy in the community. The course’s students, Palestinian and Jewish future social workers, work together with social workers, faculty, and diverse local populations in the multi-ethnic city of Haifa to combat poverty. The course employs a reflective methodology by looking critically at the relationship between the theory and practice of community work. Students discuss the issues that arise from experiencing community change at various levels. The objective of the course is to teach concepts, skills, and knowledge of community organizing, which is necessary for future social workers.
Students are involved in various neighborhood and municipal projects, in four areas selected together with local residents: the right to adequate housing, the right to education, water and electricity payments, and promotion of women’s rights. Students provide support to residents, recruit residents for the project, organize activities and vents and more. The project culminates in a report written by students together with local residents on the state of poverty in Haifa, and disseminated to decision makers and the general public.
 

Women and Inter-Cultural meeting: Challenges and Coping

Prof. Marilyn Sfar and Gili Dovrin
Haifa University
 

Planning with the Community: Concepts, Tools and Strategies for Action

Prof. Rachel Kallus and Dr. Emily Silverman
Technion – Israel Institute of Technology
This course examines community planning as a tool for social change. It rests on the assumption that planning is not just a government tool but a framework for social action with substantial effects on creation of community and forming their identity, status, and lifestyle. The course focuses on planning with the community, in contrast to the mainstream attitude of planning for the community. Planning is therefore taught as a means of mediating between people and their surroundings, and especially for people from marginalized communities, as a means to deal with social gaps and inequality. Some questions that the course raises are: what is progressive social planning and how does it promote social change? How can planners and architects effectively combat social gaps and inequality and promote marginalized communities? How can planners work together with civil society organizations? What tools do planners and architects need to lead processes of social change?
The course is open to students in urban planning, architecture, landscape architecture, and civil and environmental engineering. Students will volunteer for sixty hours each semester with civil society organizations in Haifa that promote the rights of the Arab sector in Haifa, marginalized women, poor populations, and Palestinians in Jaffa.
 

Strengthening the Welfare of Women through Awareness and Empowerment

Prof. Ariella Friedman and Abeer Halabi
Department of Behavioral Sciences, Safed College
The course will focus on the empowerment of women – both female students and women in crisis. The course will cover various forms of crises including poverty, violence, disease, sexual harassment and abuse, low social status, and psychological internalization of inequality. Almost all students in the classroom will be Palestinian women, and it will be jointly taught by a Jewish and a Palestinian woman. The course consists of three parts: first, a theoretical section in which students will read and discuss critical feminist literature and multicultural literature on women’s issues; second, self examination of students through group work and dialogue; and finally, the analysis of students’ own community service work, in which they will volunteer for four hours a week in Palestinian women’s organizations that combat sexual abuse, violence, poverty, and more.

Courses 2010-2011

Leadership and Social Change: Awareness and Initiative in Public Action

Dr. Ariela Bairey, Dr. Daniel Malach, and Moti Gigi
Dept. of Public Policy and Administration, Sapir Academic College, Sderot
This course deals with two main issues, on both theoretical and practical-experiential levels: individual and social change in a diverse and changing society, and social initiative and leadership. The course exposes the students to mainstream and innovative approaches to leadership as social action that occurs in a historical, social and political context. The course examines leadership as a process that takes place from the bottom-up and laterally, and not only from the top-down. This approach allows every individual in the room to actively examine his or her ethnic and national identities and take responsibility for who they are as members of their social and political environments. Students learn to use their strengths, privileges and shortcomings as they better understand their role in either perpetuating or interrupting social processes, and learn to take action as conscious and responsible agents of social change.
The method of instruction is engaged-critical pedagogy, in which students are challenged to read diverse theoretical approaches, respond to them and interact actively with each other on intellectual-cognitive and personal-emotional levels. As students participate in eh course and are active in organizations for social justice and human rights, the course staff offers a forum for reflection in action, within which consciousness, awareness and action are encouraged as a flexible process of orchestrating group resources, as processes of individual and social change are underway.
 

Feminism, Accessibility and the Law

Adv. Sharon Sionov and Orly Kuzin-Malachi
Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
The course examines the conditions of marginalized women in various sectors of Israeli society, their legal status as workers, mothers, single mothers and partners, and in legal, feminist, and marginalization theories. Israeli society is diverse and consists of groups with varying characteristics and traditions. Many women come from traditional backgrounds which is reflected in their status in religious costs. The course will examine the connections between knowledge, accessibility to law, marginal communities and social rights, and the direct and indirect obstacles that women and girls face when seeking to exercise their rights. The course will study various groups of marginalized women: in Islamic polygamy, the traditional Arab family and society in East Jerusalem, the family structure of the Ethiopian community, and the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community. Students will volunteer six hors a week at shelters for girls, social welfare agencies in East Jerusalem, employment agencies for Arab women, battered women shelters for Arab women, and more.
Jewish and Arab law students will initiate and pursue community work with marginalized women and girls through conducting empowerment workshops and development of a community project. Jewish and Arab women from marginalized communities will be hosted at the Hebrew University Campus to expose them to the academic environment.
 

Marginalized Populations, Human Rights and Social Change

Dr. Edith Blit-Cohen and Tami Gross
School of Social Work, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
This course deals with civil and social rights and the relationship between the violation of human rights and the creation of social exclusion, exploitation and oppression. During the course, the students examine the phenomenon of social exclusion among different groups. In addition, the course deals with different ways of combating social exclusion, such as community organizing, consciousness raising and social change. A special part of the course is dedicated to discussing the relevance and the role of social workers in creating responses for socially excluded persons at the different levels of intervention: the micro , the mezzo, and the macro level. Throughout the course, students become engaged with civil society organizations concerned with socio-economic gaps, with an emphasis on Jews and Palestinians in Israel.
 

The Unit for (In)formal Architecture Studies

Senan Abd-Elkader and Liat Briks Atgar
School of Architecture, Bezalel Academy of Art and Design

One of the central features of Israel’s built landscape is informal construction, that circumvents the legal, planning, and execution requirements of formal building. Such a phenomenon is typical of marginalized populations globally, who for various reasons are barred from using the accepted system. The unit for (in)formal architecture studies examines these phenomena and its effect on the landscape of our lives. We are interested in how such construction expresses the relationships between the powerful and the powerless. The objective of the course is to train future architects who are aware of the existence and complexity of the informal building phenomenon. Students will aim to create meaningful architecture through dialogue with Palestinian residents of East Jerusalem in consideration of the social and cultural complexity of the existing built landscape. The course will be conducted in cooperation with Bimkom – Planners for Planning Rights, and the legal clinic at Al-Kuds University.

For the website of the Unit for (In)Formal Architecture, press here.

 

Image and Reality - Visual Dialogue

Miki Kratzman and Chen Shapira
Photography Department, Bezalel - Academy of Art and Design

The course's main objective is to spur among the students awareness and acknowledgement of the human, social and political reality that surrounds them. It seeks to provide them with skills and tools for understanding and acting in the public sphere, expand the perceived role of the artist and of art itself, and broaden the perception of art and photography as a discourse. The course raises questions relating to human rights, and place, and questions relating to art in the social, political and human context. It is based on dialogue with the residents of Sheikh Jarrah in Jerusalem, researching the stories of the residents and the manner in which group narratives are constructed, and how they may change and influence the public sphere.

In the course students receive theoretical background preparation, following which they work with the residents and families of Sheikh Jarrah. The students research the stories, learn about the neighborhood through different means of documentation and observation, form visual dialogue with the residents, and organize a concluding exhibit that includes a screening and sharing of materials in the community.  

For the website of the Sheikh Jarrah Project, press here.

 

Human Rights, Gender, and Planning in Jerusalem

Dr. Daphna Golan, Adv. Sami Ershied, and Amany Khalefa
Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Founded in 1999, this course brings together sixteen graduate and undergraduate students from a range of academic departments, who are interested in and committed to human rights. The students participate in a bi-weekly seminar that integrates theoretical study with ten hours of weekly volunteering at a human rights organization. The course reviews various aspects of human rights in Israeli society with an emphasis on gender and planning. The first part of the course discusses the universality of human rights: conceptual foundations of human rights, international conventions, international enforcement mechanisms, international human rights NGOs, and feminist criticism on human rights issues. The next, central part of the course focuses on the knowledge acquired from action throughout the entire year, both in lessons in which all the students attend and in two smaller supervision groups - the one dealing with gender issues and the other with planning and construction. The course combines theory and practice, and throughout the year we will discuss academic articles and the dilemmas that arise from social action.
 

Education for Social Justice, Environmental Justice, and Peace Education

Hagith Gor Ziv, Galia Zalmansson, and Gal Harmat
Kibbutzim College of Education
This teachers’ training program of four years for B.Ed aims at building the teachers’ capacity to educate children toward social justice and peace, raising their awareness to gender inequalities and other forms of discrimination in education. The students practical training is performed in organizations for social change, and in schools at disadvantaged communities, including Jewish-Arab student activist organization Mahapach-Taghir, Arab-Jewish projects in Jaffa, and the Jewish and Arab Women’s Association in Rosh Ha’Ayin. Students are required to implement ideas of alternative education, and innovative relevant pedagogy for children from marginalized groups.
The group of students participating in the program reflects in itself the various segments of Israeli society and provides an unparalleled space for intergroup dialogue – Palestinian and Jewish, migrant workers, disabled students, young and old, from the center and from the periphery. Students speak seven different languages and affiliate with four religions. The program offers courses on Israeli society, human rights and children’s’ rights, gender equality, critical pedagogy, and more. In addition the students specialize in one educational discipline – math, science, literature and language and Jewish and Arab culture. They are taught how to integrate social justice and peace education into the existing required curricula.
 

Planning, Sustainability and Human Rights: Theory and Practice – The Right to Adequate Housing in Jaffa Gimel

Prof. Tovi Fenster and Tal Kulka
Dept. of Geography and Human Environment, Tel Aviv University

The course is a graduate course for students specializing in urban planning as part of their graduate studies at the Dept. of Geography and Human Environment. The course is also open to students from other departments including architecture, environmental studies, law, public policy, and management. The course is part of a growing research and teaching program at the Laboratory for Planning, Environment, and Community Studies. The lab aims to connect academic study with the community through student research projects, the establishment of an interactive website for the use of various communities, and conferences and study days focusing on human rights, justice and equality in the areas of planning and development.

For the Laboratory for Planning for the Environment with Communities website, press here.

 

Methods for Community Organizing: The Haifa Partnership for the Eradication of Poverty

Dr. Roni Strier
School of Social Work, University of Haifa
This course examines the community strategies to combat poverty and aims to create an equal partnership between the academy in the community. The course’s students, Palestinian and Jewish future social workers, work together with social workers, faculty, and diverse local populations in the multi-ethnic city of Haifa to combat poverty. The course employs a reflective methodology by looking critically at the relationship between the theory and practice of community work. Students discuss the issues that arise from experiencing community change at various levels. The objective of the course is to teach concepts, skills, and knowledge of community organizing, which is necessary for future social workers.
Students are involved in various neighborhood and municipal projects, in four areas selected together with local residents: the right to adequate housing, the right to education, water and electricity payments, and promotion of women’s rights. Students provide support to residents, recruit residents for the project, organize activities and vents and more. The project culminates in a report written by students together with local residents on the state of poverty in Haifa, and disseminated to decision makers and the general public.
 

Planning with the Community: Concepts, Tools and Strategies for Action

Prof. Rachel Kallus and Dr. Emily Silverman
Technion – Israel Institute of Technology
This course examines community planning as a tool for social change. It rests on the assumption that planning is not just a government tool but a framework for social action with substantial effects on creation of community and forming their identity, status, and lifestyle. The course focuses on planning with the community, in contrast to the mainstream attitude of planning for the community. Planning is therefore taught as a means of mediating between people and their surroundings, and especially for people from marginalized communities, as a means to deal with social gaps and inequality. Some questions that the course raises are: what is progressive social planning and how does it promote social change? How can planners and architects effectively combat social gaps and inequality and promote marginalized communities? How can planners work together with civil society organizations? What tools do planners and architects need to lead processes of social change?
The course is open to students in urban planning, architecture, landscape architecture, and civil and environmental engineering. Students will volunteer for sixty hours each semester with civil society organizations in Haifa that promote the rights of the Arab sector in Haifa, marginalized women, poor populations, and Palestinians in Jaffa.
 

Strengthening the Welfare of Women through Awareness and Empowerment

Prof. Ariella Friedman and Abeer Halabi
Department of Behavioral Sciences, Safed College
The course will focus on the empowerment of women – both female students and women in crisis. The course will cover various forms of crises including poverty, violence, disease, sexual harassment and abuse, low social status, and psychological internalization of inequality. Almost all students in the classroom will be Palestinian women, and it will be jointly taught by a Jewish and a Palestinian woman. The course consists of three parts: first, a theoretical section in which students will read and discuss critical feminist literature and multicultural literature on women’s issues; second, self examination of students through group work and dialogue; and finally, the analysis of students’ own community service work, in which they will volunteer for four hours a week in Palestinian women’s organizations that combat sexual abuse, violence, poverty, and more.

Social Change Organizations

  • אב"י - האגודה הבינלאומית לזכויות הילד - ישראל 
    آبي- الجمعية العالمية لحقوق الطفل-إسرائيل 
    International Association for Children's Rights - Israel Office 

  • אגודת ההומואים, הלסביות, הביסקסואלים והטרנסג'נדרס בישראל
    جمعية الهوميم ومثيليات الجنس , هبيسوكسواليم وطرانسجندرس فيإسرائيل
    The Association of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexuals and Transgenders in Israel

  • אדם טבע ודין - האגודה הישראלית להגנת הסביבה
    إنسان طبيعة وحكم- الجمعية الإسرائيلية لحمايةالبيئة
    ADAM TEVA V'DIN - Israel Union for Environmental Defense

  • האגודה הישראלית למען יהודי אתיופיה
    الجمعية الإسرائيلية من أجل يهودإثيوبيا
    Israeli Association for Ethiopian Jews

  • האגודה לזכויות האזרח האזרח בישראל
    الجمعية لحقوق المواطن في إسرائيل
    The Association for Civil Rights in Israel

  • אחותי
    أختي
    Achoti

  • איגוד מרכזי הסיוע לנפגעות תקיפה מינית
    تنظيم مراكز مساعدة ضحايا الاعتداءالجنسي
    The Association of Rape Crisis Centers in Israel

  • איתך-מעכי - משפטניות למען צדק חברתי
    معكِ- حقوقيات من أجل العدالةالاجتماعية
    Itach-Ma'aki - Women Lawyers for Social Justice

  • אמנסטי אינטרנשיונל - סניף ישראל
    منظمة- العفو الدولية, آمنستي- فرعإسرائيل
    Amnesty International - Israel Section

  • אסוואת
    أصوات
    Aswat

  • בית חם
    بيت دافئ
    Beit Ham (Warm House)

  • במקום - מתכננים למען זכויות תכנון
    بمكوم- مخططون من اجل حقوق التخطيط
    Bimkom - Planners for Planning Rights

  • בצלם - מרכז המידע הישראלי לזכויות האדם בשטחים
    بتسيلم- مركز المعلومات الإسرائيلي لحقوق الإنسان في الأراضيالمحتلة
    B'tselem - The Israeli Information Center for Human Rights in the Occupied Territories

  • בת שלום
    بنت السلام
    Bat Shalom

  • גישה - מרכז לשמירה על הזכות לנוע
    مسلك- مركز الدفاع عن حرية الحركة
    Gisha - Center for the Legal Protection of the Freedom of Movement

  • גלריית ברבור
    معرض الإوز
    Barbur Gallery

  • החוט המשולש - ירושלים
    الخيط المثلث-القدس
    HaKhut HaMeshulash (Triangle String) - Jerusalem

  • הל"ה - למען החינוך בשכונות ובעיירות הפיתוח
    منظمة هيلة- من أجل التعليم في الأحياء ومدنالتطوير
    HILA - Israeli Committee for Equality Education

  • הועד הישראלי נגד הריסת בתים
    الحركة الإسرائيلية ضد هدم البيوت
    The Israeli Committee Against House Demolitions

  • הועד הציבורי נגד עינויים
    اللجنة العامة ضد التعذيب في إسرائيل
    Public Committee Against Torture in Israel

  • זוכרות
    ذاكرات
    Zochrot

  • חוש"ן - חינוך ושינוי
    حوشن- تعليم وتغيير
    Hoshen - Education and Change

  • ידיד - מרכזי זכויות בקהילה
    صديق- مراكز حقوق في المجتمعاتالمحلية
    Yedid - Association for Community Empowerment

  • יש דין - ארגון מתנדבים לזכויות אדם
    ييش دين- منظمة متطوعين لحقوقالإنسان
    Yesh Din - Volunteers for Human Rights

  • כייאן - ארגון פמיניסטי
    كيان- تنظيم نسوي
    Kayan - Feminist Organization

  • מדה אל-כרמל - המרכז הערבי למחקר חברתי יישומי
    مدى الكرمل- المركز العربي للدراسات الاجتماعيةالتطبيقية
    Mada al-Carmel - Arab Center for Applied Social Research

  • מהפך
    تغيير
    Mahapach - Taghir

  • מוסאוא - מרכז לזכויות האזרחים הערבים בישראל
    مساواة- مركز لحقوق المواطنين العرب فيإسرائيل
    Mossawa Center - Advocacy Center for Arab Citizens of Israel

  • המועצה לשלום הילד
    المجلس الوطني لسلامة الطفل
    National Council for the Child

  • מחויבות לשלום ולצדק חברתי
    التزام للسلام والعدل الاجتماعي
    Commitment to Peace and Social Justice

  • מחסום WATCH - נשים למען זכויות אדם
    لا للحواجز- نساء من اجل حقوقالإنسان
    Machsom Watch - Women for Human Rights

  • מסילה - סיוע לילדי עובדים זרים
    مسيلا- مساعدة لأبناء العمالالغرباء
    Messila - Assistance to Children of Migrant Workers

  • מעון לנשים מוכות, טירה
    ملجأ للنساء المضروبات,طيرة
    Shelter for Battered Women, Tira

  • מועדון ספיר לנוער אתיופי, נתניה
    نادي سبير للشبان الإثيوبيون,نتانيا
    Sapir Club for Ethiopian Youth, Natanya

  • המוקד להגנת הפרט
    هموكيد- مركز الدفاع عن الفرد
    Hamoked - Center for the Defense of the Individual

  • מוקד סיוע לעובדים זרים
    مركز مساعدة العمال الغرباء
    Hotline for Migrant Workers

  • מכון תודעה לחקר תופעת הזנות וסחר הנשים בעולם
    مؤسسة توعية لبحث ظاهرة الزنى والمتاجرة في النساء فيالعالم
    Toda'a (Consciousness) Institute for the Study of Prostitution and Women Trafficking

  • מעיין החינוך הדמוקרטי
    منبع التعليمالديمقراطي
    Wellspring for Democratic Education

  • מרכז השל - המכון הישראלי לחשיבה ומנהיגות סביבתית
    مركز هشل- المركز الإسرائيلي للفكر والقيادةالبيئية
    Heschel Center for Environmental Learning and Leadership

  • מרכז צומת
    مركز تسومت (مفرق)
    Crossroads

  • מקב"ץ, קידום נוער, עיריית ירושלים
    مكباتس, تقديم الشبيبة, بلديةالقدس
    Mikbaz, Advancement of Youth, Jerusalem Municipality

  • מתנ"ס עיסאוויה
    مركز جماهيريعيساوية
    Issawiah Community Center

  • נשים נגד אלימות - נצרת
    نساء ضد العنف- الناصرة
    Women Against Violence - Nazereth

  • סינגור קהילתי
    جسر جماهيري
    Community Advocacy

  • עדאלה - המרכז המשפטי לזכויות המיעוט הערבי בישראל
    عدالة- المركز القانوني لحقوق الأقلية العربية فيإسرائيل
    Adalah - The Legal Center for Arab Minority Rights in Israel

  • עיקר - הקואליציה הבינלאומית לזכויות העגונה ומסורבת הגט
    عيكار- الائتلاف العالمي لحقوق الزوجة المهجوة والممتنع عن إعطائهاوثيقة الطلاق.
    Iqar - International Coalition for the Rights of Agunot and Get-Refused Women

  • על"מ - עמותה לנוער במצבי סיכון
    جمعية علم- جمعية للشباب في حالاتالخطر
    ELEM - Youth in Distress in Israel

  • העמותה להעצמה כלכלית לנשים
    جمعية التمكين الاقتصادي للنساء
    Economic Empowerment of Women

  • עמותת אלון למעורבות חברתית
    جمعية ألون للمشاركة الاجتماعية
    Alon Social Involvement Organization

  • קבוצת נוער אקולוגי, מחלקת נוער וקהילה, כפר סבא
    مجموعة شباب بيئي, قسم الشبابوالجمهور, كفار سابا
    Ecological Youth Group, Department of Youth and Community, Kfar Saba

  • קואליציית נשים חיפה
    إئتلاف نساء حيفا
    Haifa Women's Coalition

  • קו לעובד
    خط العامل
    Kav La'Oved - Protecting the Rights of Workers in Israel

  • קול האישה
    صوت المراة
    Kol Ha-Isha - The Woman's Voice

  • הקורה בקפה - ירושלים
    العارضة في القهوة-القدس
    Ha'Kore B'café - Jerusalem

  • הקשת הדמוקרטית המזרחית
    القوس الديمقراطي الشرقي
    The Mizrachi Democratic Rainbow

  • רבנים למען זכויות אדם - שומרי משפט
    حاخامين من اجل حقوق الإنسان- حراسالقضاء
    Rabbis for Human Rights

  • רופאים לזכויות אדם
    أطباء لحقوق الإنسان
    Physicians for Human Rights

  • שדולת הנשים
    لوبي النساء في إسرائيل
    The Women's Lobby in Israel

  • שתי"ל - שירותי תמיכה ויעוץ לארגונים לשינוי חברתי
    شتيل- خدمات دعم واستشارة لجمعيات التغييرالاجتماعي
    SHATIL - Empowerment and Training Center for Social Change Organizations

Student Research Papers (in Hebrew)

שם: שלומית שטיין 

נושא העבודה: בשני קווים מקבילים או בתנועה מעגלית מתמדת? פינוי משפחות שייח ג'ראח בראי משפט וחברה

קורס: זכויות אדם בחברה הישראלית 

מרצה: ד"ר דפנה גולן- עגנון 

מוסד: האוניברסיטה העברית בירושלים 

שם: כאותר מתאני 

נושא העבודה: אני והיא אחת אנו

קורס: שוויון והבדלים בין המינים 

מרצה: ד"ר דפנה גולן- עגנון 

מוסד: האוניברסיטה העברית בירושלים 

שם: תמר אצקסון 

נושא עבודה: "השיח על מין ומיניות בין בני נוער ובבתי ספר בישראל"

קורס: חינוך לשוויון ומניעת אלימות בין המינים 

מרצה: ד"ר דפנה גולן- עגנון 

מוסד: האוניברסיטה העברית בירושלים 

שם: מורן ססי 

נושא העבודה: "העלאת מודעות בסדנאות למניעת אלימות מינית: הרצף שבין ידיעה- ואי ידיעה"

קורס: חינוך לשוויון ומניעת אלימות בין המינים 

מרצה: ד"ר דפנה גולן- עגנון 

מוסד: האוניברסיטה העברית בירושלים 

שם: לירון ברדוגו 

נושא העבודה: "תרגיל סיכום בקרוס זכויות אדם והחברה הישראלית"

קורס: זכויות אדם והחברה הישראלית 

מרצה: ד"ר דפנה גולן- עגנון 

מוסד: האוניברסיטה העברית בירושלים 

שם: ניירוז 

נושא העבודה: "סדנאות בנושא תקיפות מיניות"

מרצה: ד"ר דפנה גולן- עגנון 

מוסד: האוניברסיטה העברית בירושלים 

שם: אתי ביטון, מיכל זיו, נעם פרי, ענת שטרמן, רונה משיח 

נושא העבודה: "סטודנטים נגד קליינטים"

קורס: זכויות אדם, פמיניזם ושינוי חברתי 

מרצה: ד"ר דפנה גולן- עגנון 

מוסד: האוניברסיטה העברית בירושלים 

שם: נטע בר 

נושא העבודה: "קורבן של אף אחד"

קורס: שוויון ומניעת אלימות בין המינים 

מרצה: ד"ר דפנה גולן- עגנון 

מוסד: האוניברסיטה העברית בירושלים

Events

Our work throughout the years has involved the organizing of several venues that bring together faculty members, active students, civil society organizations, and representatives of institutions of higher education. The goal of these venues is to enable knowledge exchange and joint learning about the academy-community relationship, and to foster networks and cooperation among participants. Such venues include:
  • Workshops and study days for faculty members teaching community-engaged courses or interested in developing such courses, to discuss topics such as service learning pedagogy, work with civil society organizations and evaluation.
  • Student seminars, both local and national, to encourage and enhance Jewish and Arab students' action in social change organizations, focusing on issues such as critical pedagogy, community organizing, legal aid, and human rights advocacy.
  • An annual conference for all stakeholders in campus-community programs, to present knowledge about engaged policies, best practices, and research of community-engaged courses.

Upcoming Events

Workshops and study days

Partnerships between academia and community in times of Crisis- Meeting Summary

Council for Higher Education Study Day: Social Engagement – Academia's Third Mission, November 14, 2012

Academic Research and Social Activism: Partnership or Isolation? 16 December 2012, School of Social Work, Mount Scopus Campus,Hebrew University, Jerusalem

Study-day: Outlines for Civilian Architecture, Jerusalem, December 1, 2011

The Social Periphery's Protest, Kibbutzim College of Education, Tel-Aviv, November 20, 2011

The Struggle for a Home in Jerusalem, October 25, 2011

Faculty and Students' Work with Marginalized Communities in Jerusalem, April 6, 2011

Developing Community-Engaged Courses, Tel-Aviv, December 15, 2010

Gender and Planning in Jerusalem, Jerusalem, October 24, 2010

Community-University Partnerships in Conflict Zones, Jerusalem, March 4, 2010

Legal Perspectives of the Jewish Settlement in Sheikh Jarrah and East Jerusalem, Jerusalem, January 17, 2010

Dilemmas and Possible Cooperation in the Haifa Region, Haifa, December 24, 2009

First Study Day for the 2009-2010 Academic Year, November 15, 2009

End of Year Study Day for Engaged Faculty, June 29, 2009

Winter Seminar for Engaged Faculty, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, February 11, 2009

Social Responsibility of Higher Education Institutions, Tel-Aviv, March 22, 2007

Committed Academy? Jerusalem, January 28, 2007

What Does Student Social Engagement Mean? Sderot, January 17, 2007

Learning from Success, Tel Aviv, June 26, 2006

Workshop on the development of courses that integrate action of students promoting human rights and social justice, Jerusalem, January 8, 2006

Study Day on Academy-Community Relations, The Council for Higher Education, Jerusalem, November 27, 2005

Partnerships between academia and community in times of Crisis

Council for Higher Education Study Day

On November 14, 2012, the Council for Higher Education in Israel held a study day on "Social Engagement – Academia's Third Mission" addressing the engagement of academia in the community.

 

The study day took place at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design which was granted Excellent Institution Award by the Planning and Budgeting Committee of the Council for Higher Education (CHE) for developing and teaching fifteen courses which integrate social action in the academic year 2010 – 2011. The courses demonstrate the exceptional social involvement in the community and the ability of academia to advance engagement in the community characterized by awareness and high quality. 

 

The study day included three sessions:

 

In the first session, the Planning and Budgeting Committee's policy was discussed. Professor Faisal Azaiza, Chairman of the PBC Steering Committee for the Involvement of Academia in the Community, presented the PBC's policy on academia's engagement in the community. Press here for the presentation. Professor Azaiza's involvement in the field contributed to significant changes in both academia and the PBC.

 

Afterwards, Professor Manuel Trachtenberg, Chairman of the PBC, gave a lecture on the role of academia in Israeli society. Professor Trachtenberg presented his doctrine on the subject which breaks through the borders of academia and emphasizes the central role of academia in Israeli society in a warm, moving and informed way.

 

The second session featured the flagship projects, that is, the "core" projects of the institutions of higher education which utilize the relative advantage of each academic institution in the social and geographic area they are working in. Projects like these turn the institution into an inseparable part of the community which surrounds it, thus strengthening the positive impact of academia on the Israeli society. The concept is based on understanding that in addition to academia's leading role in developing, preserving and disseminating knowledge it has a social mission, too, and it is expected to fulfill it.

 

Lectures given in the second session:

  1. The session was opened by Dr. Roni Strier who is leading the flagship project at the University ofHaifa titled "Partnership for the Development of Solidarity and for Challenging Social Exclusion". The project is based on vast academic knowledge which has been accumulated in the field of social exclusion, and on understanding that in order to lead a true change in the community, academia must not come to the community with a patronizing or "educating" attitude, but instead as a true, equal and long-term partner, and it must be ready to learn from the community and change together with it, too.  The aim of the project is to provide effective tools to Haifa's underprivileged neighborhoods in order to deal with social exclusion on a daily basis, especially in areas like education, culture and health care. The project was presented jointly by Dr. Roni Strier, Ms. Dasi Posten Aizik, the project's manager, and Ms. Silvi Zguri, the community's representative. Press here for the presentation.

 

 

  1. The second lecture, about the "Hothouse for Social Entrepreneurship" of the Academic College of Tel Aviv-Yaffo, was given by the President of the College, Professor Nehemia Friedland. The Academic College of Tel Aviv-Yaffo runs a unique project that encourages and trains students to initiate, establish and run projects for social change in Yaffo and south Tel Aviv. The program provides guidance to students from the first year, during which they are required to participate in the social entrepreneurship course and receive practical training, through the second and third year, during which the students go through different stages until their initiatives are adopted by the community. In case of need, the program provides guidance to the students and their social initiatives also after they completed their degree.  The Academic College of Tel Aviv-Yaffo is an example of an academic institution where the social involvement has been adopted as a policy by the top management (President of the College, Prof. Nehemia Friedland). The project was presented by Prof. Nehemia Friedland, and by Ms. Ella Hassona who developed a unique environmental initiative and introduced it to schools in Yaffo. For her special contribution, Ms. Ella Hassona was granted the Shosh Berlinsky-Sheinfeld Award by the CHE's Planning and Budgeting Committee in a moving awards ceremony at the end of the study day. Press here for The presentation.

 

 

  1. The third lecture, featuring the National Union of Students' project in Lod, was given by Mr Yuval Bdolach, Head of the National Union of Students Department for the Social Involvement, who leads the project. Within the framework of the project, titled RE-LOD, many students come to live in Lod and work with the residents for social change in the city. Press here for The presentation.

 

 

In the third session, academic courses integrating social action were presented and the session was dedicated to the memory of Professor Miriam Schlesinger. She led the Community Interpreting course at the Bar Ilan University and was supposed to present it, but to our great sorrow she died from cancer a few days before the study day. We offer our most heartfelt condolences to the family and the Bar IlanUniversity.

 

The session opened with a speech by Dr. Daphna Golan, the member of the Involvement of Academia in the Community Steering Committee, in memory of Prof. Miriam Schlesinger.

 

Lectures given in the third session:

 

  1. The lecture on the community interpreting was given by Dr. Michal Schuster who developed and taught the course jointly with Prof. Miriam Schlesinger. Dr. Schuster emphasized the importance and power of such a course both on the academic and community level. Press here for The presentation.

 

  1. The study day was concluded with a presentation by Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design. Bezalel was chosen by the Steering Committee of the Social Involvement of Academia and Students in the Community as the Excellent Institute of the academic year 2010 – 2011 for its large range of courses integrating social action and for their academic qualities. In 2010, when the Planning and Budgeting Committee launched the new budgeting model for activities, Bezalel opened 15 courses integrating social action in which almost 300 students participated. Bezalel went out into the community in a wide range of areas, and the courses integrating social action reflect the involvement of both the top management and a number of departments, including architecture, photography, industrial design, visual communication and many multidisciplinary courses. Ms. Shelly Hershko, Dean of Students Office and lecturer, presented Bezalel's vision. Architect Liat Briks Etgar, lecturer at the Architecture Department, presented the course "From Formalist Architecture to Point of Reference", and Ms. Ruth Kantor, lecturer at the Visual Communication Department, together with two students Maya Yehezkel and Ori Barry presented the course "The State is Me".

 

The study day was moderated by Ms. Yael Siman Tov Cohen, senior employee of CHE in charge of society, community and preparatory courses. 

 

Press here for photos from the event

Academic Research and Social Activism

Academic Research and Social Activism: Partnership or Isolation? 16 December 2012, School of Social Work, Mount Scopus Campus,Hebrew University, Jerusalem

Professors Shdaimah and Schram led the workshop, which took place at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s School of Social Work and Social Welfare. The topic was “Academic Research and Social Change Activism: Contact or Failure?” The workshop brought together some 50 participants – faculty and students from the Hebrew University, Tel Aviv University, the Technion, Haifa University, and others, along with welfare workers and activists from human rights and social change organizations such as Amnesty International and Gisha. The faculty members came from various disciplines, among them social work, law, sociology, anthropology and criminology. Most of the students were participants in engaged courses, such as the Hebrew University’s “Human Rights and Israeli Society” or graduate/postgraduate students doing socially engaged research. 

The workshop addressed the complexity of reciprocal relations between researchers and social activists, examining the relevance of academic research to furthering the goals of social struggles and vice versa. Professors Schram and Shdaimah presented innovative methods and tools for creating partnerships between academics and activists, stressing the potential and the challenges that inhere in such partnerships. They analyzed approaches, strategies and research methodologies that might foster collaboration between the academy and social change organizations. The workshop exposed the participants to current knowledge with regard to models and practices of academy-community partnership in the world and to the integration of academic knowledge with that acquired in the field. It provided them with an opportunity to discuss and reflect on partnerships from the perspective of all the participants in the process. 

The main points made by Professors Schram and Shdaimah were as follows: 

Professor Schram discussed the problem of relations between social workers and the subjects of research in the sculpting of social policy; this confronts most, if not all, social workers conducting research in the field. His book provides theories regarding how to research issues that are of importance to both community and researcher. Professor Schram encourages the use of the “bottom-up” method according to which the community members are those who actually implement the change that social workers or researchers want to see in the community, and not mere objects of observation. The social worker should consider the role they wish to play and how they can utilize the knowledge of the community members successfully in their research by posing the simple question: What is the relationship between thought and action, or theory and policy? Schram also described the importance of problem-driven research in communities that call on social workers to help resolve their social issues. Researchers (social workers especially), should not fear the technical application of research and should push the boundaries of their discipline and use multiple methods. 

Professor Shdaimah explained the moral and ethical stance social workers might take towards the research being done in juxtaposition to their obligations as social workers or researchers. Social work today may be driven by individual legitimacy and academic status rather than the problems facing the community. In order to achieve the goals that the researcher has set, the knowledge and skills of both sides (researcher and community member) must be used and retained rather than compromised in order to reach middle ground. Professor Shdaimah described the research methods employed in the homelessness prevention project and also in the criminal justice department’s attempts to create a solution for prostitution. Social workers’ ethics compel them not to ignore findings that are disagreeable, but rather to understand the findings and interpret the knowledge for the benefit of the community. 

Conference in Haifa

 

 

 

(Right to Left) Prof. Johnny Gal, Dean of the School of Social Work and Social Welfare at the Hebrew University, Prof. Sanford Schram and Prof. Corey Shdaimah

Outlines for Civilian Architecture

Study-day: Outlines for Civilian Architecture, Jerusalem, December 1, 2011

The study-day, organized by the (In)formal Architecture Research Unit at the Department of Architecture, Bezalel – Academy of Arts and Design, in partnership with Bimkom – Planners for Planning Rights and Campus-Community Partnership for Social Change, addressed issues of civilian architecture – citizens' involvement in the planning process, and social involvement through the architectural practice.

 

 

          The study-day opened with introductory remarks by Architect Shmulik Groag from Bimkom, and Architects Senan Abdelqader and Liat Briks-Atgar, of the (In)formal Architecture Research Unit at Bezalel. The day was facilitated by students of the Unit.

 

 

Attorney Gil Gan-Mor, of the Association for Civil Rights in Israel and the Coalition for Affordable Housing, opened the first session of the day. Gan-Mor presented the gaps that exist between affordable housing and spatial justice in Israel, between the spirit that the social justice protest raised this past summer to the concepts and values expressed by the current government.

 

 

          Architect Efrat Cohen Bar from Binkom shared with the audience thoughts and insights relating to citizens' involvement in the planning process, following Bimkom's community planning initiative in Issaiya, East Jerusalem.

 

 

          Prof. Tovi Fenster, director of the Planning for the Environment with Communities (PEC) Lab at the Department of Geography and Human Environment, Tel-Aviv University, and Mr. Sebastian Wallerstein of the Department of Strategic Planning and Urban Renewal in Bat Yam Municipality, presented each one from her and his individual perspective the project "Meonot Yam" in Bat Yam. This is a joint project of Tel-Aviv University and Bat Yam Municipality, in which the residents of "Meonot Yam" site in Bat Yam plan the building, environment and landscape in which they live. Prof. Fenster mentioned in her presentation that the work with the residents needs to account for two tracks – the planning track and the communal-social track. The planner does not remain in the project for the long-term, and therefore it is important to form a significant, strong group of residents that will undergo a process of training and civic/communal capacity building that will enable the group to promote issues facing the municipality. Wallerstein also related to the human resource that the project develops as the great opportunity concealed in such a project.

 

          The session was concluded by Architect Senan Abdelqader who introduced the project of civilian architecture in Arab al-Sawahre neighborhood in East Jerusalem. Abdelqader described the special conditions in the neighborhood and the successes and challenges that the work with the residents calls for.

 

 

          The second session was opened with a presentation by Architect Yuval Yasky, head of the Department of Architecture at Bezalel. Yasky introduced the Salameh document (link in Hebrew) whose aim is to bring to the public discourse in Israel a new spatial agenda. The document undermines the planning principles that currently guide spatial planning policy in Israel, and which are responsible for many problems and failures. It calls for architects and planners to "…adopt a new culture of responsibility and wide engagement, with long-term thinking…" and to develop new models for building and planning of and in cities and suburbs.

 

 

          In continuation, Architect Liat Briks-Atgar related to the social role and responsibility of the Department of Architecture at Bezalel. Briks-Atgar is the initiator and director of Bezalel's leading social project "Point of Reference (Mare Makom) – Documentation and Study of Local Space from the Residents' Point of View and Preparation of a Civic, Planning Vision for Neighborhoods in Jerusalem". This project was chosen by the Council for Higher Education in Israel as one of the excellent leading social projects to be awarded funding for the 2011/12 academic year.

 

 

          The day was concluded by an open discussion with the participation of representatives of public institutions and local government, residents of Jerusalem, social activists, representatives of civil society organizations acting for spatial justice, architects and students. Among the active participants in the discussion were Eti Chen, representative of the "no choice tent camps" in Jerusalem, and Saleh Diab, resident of Sheikh Jarrah active in the struggle against the expanding settlement in the neighborhood.

 

 

          One key idea which developed as part of the open discussion is the formation of a group of students, architects and planners from the Department of Architecture at Bezalel, that will plan a public housing project in one of the abandoned buildings in the city, following similar models of such projects that exist abroad. The objective of the group would be to prepare a detailed project file relating to a specific building, which will be presented to possible funders for support to enable its realization. 

 

For the invitation (in Hebrew), press here.

The Social Periphery's Protest

he Social Periphery's Protest, Kibbutzim College of Education, Tel-Aviv, November 20, 2011
This joint event of the Campus-Community Partnership and the Education for Social Justice Program and the Unit for Social Involvement of the Kibbutzim College of Education, marked the opening of the academic year – aiming to expose students to the actions and dilemmas of one of the groups making up the widespread social justice protest which developed this past summer.
 
For the invitation (in Hebrew), press here.
 
The event centered on a panel entitled "The Social Periphery's Protest: Distinctiveness and Dilemmas". Participants in the panel were Attorney Sameh Iraqi, deputy mayor of Tira, and member of Mossawa Center; Yael Ben-Yefet, director of the Mizrahi Democratic Rainbow; and Dr. Hani Zubeida, of the Political Science Department, Yezreel Valley Academic College – all members of the Social Periphery Forum, a forum incorporating representatives from the tent encampments that were set up in underprivileged neighborhoods, villages and towns throughout the social peripheries of Israel this past summer.
 
The panel addressed the position of the social periphery's protest within the widespread social justice protest. The speakers related to the Social Periphery Forum's objectives, its distinctiveness, and the role of the media in representing its struggle.
 
Yael Ben-Yefet related to the disappointment from how the protest, that asked to raise the flag of social justice and change, eventually reproduced the familiar social and institutional processes. According to Ben-Yefet, the leaders of the social justice protest come from an ethnically characterized social group and cannot truly represent the periphery's demands. The Social Periphery Forum was initiated in order to allow groups from the periphery to express their demands independently, directly. Relating to the media's role in the protest struggle Ben-Yefet said that the media allocates roles in a superficial manner. For example, when preparing a news item on a poor individual it will always want to shoot that individual's refrigerator (presumably empty). Ben-Yefet added that the fact that the protest's leaders are not able to represent the periphery's problems emanates from an innocent position, as well as from unawareness and even ignorance.
 
Attorney Sameh Iraqi claimed that the fact that the widespread social justice protest grew out of the middle class is completely natural. This class has convenient access to the media and to the public institutions, since it is part of them, and therefore holds the power to advance change. The periphery's struggle did not begin this summer, but the movement of the middle class became an opportunity. The problem is that the middle class, despite its call in the name of the people, did not succeed in representing the real distress of the majority – of the poor Jewish and Arab neighborhoods and towns. The underprivileged communities, Jewish and Arab, were intentionally divided and disconnected by the public institutions, and the Social Periphery Forum asks to link them into one struggle. The real struggle, asserted Iraqi, is always surrounding land and housing, and a true social process could take place only while addressing these problems. The media, naturally, represents the middle class. For the Social Periphery Forum it is harder to penetrate the media's consciousness, but this is something that needs to be fought over. The entire society needs to be recruited to join the struggle of the periphery and to create true solidarity.
 
Dr. Hani Zubeida talked about how as a researcher of social movements and social protest, the events of this past summer pleased him, but, he added, the periphery must be represented in the widespread protest. Society is a pyramid whose base is the periphery, and that is why it is important to secure the periphery's rights and care for its representation in order to lead toward real change – if we will remove the base the pyramid will collapse. The Social Periphery Forum's role is to represent. The representation of the different populations in the Knesset, and in the judicial system, for example, must be according to their percentage in the population, as opposed to the current situation. Relating to the media, Dr. Zubeida mentioned that the media's role is to sell, and therefore it does not represent the periphery – poverty does not sell.
 
Following the panel, participants broke down into two discussion circles, which continued the discussion of the panel, and addressed different issues relating to the social periphery's struggle. One circle focused on the needs of those who are still in the tent encampments, and the different ways in which students can become involved or initiate actions that will answer the direct needs of the residents of the remaining encampments. The second circle discussed the manner in which the Social Periphery Forum constitutes a connection between different social groups, and particularly between Jews and Arabs in Israel.

The Struggle for a Home in Jerusalem

The Struggle for a Home in Jerusalem, October 25, 2011
Following the social protest campaign that began last summer, and particularly the social protest struggle of the homeless, we decided to convene a meeting entitled "The Struggle for a Home in Jerusalem" about public and affordable housing and the condition of the homeless who are still living in tents. About 40 people attended: residents of the public housing tents, social activists, representatives of social organizations, students and university lecturers.
 
After opening comments, the participants broke down into four groups with each group addressing a different topic concerning the campaign for housing and the university's role in it:
 
The Stern dormitories: the group discussed the idea that a building that belongs to the Hebrew University and has not been used for six years, and which is designated for student dormitories, be converted into a combination of student dormitories, public housing and affordable housing. The group included students, tent camp activists and university lecturers. The group decided to continue pursuing a dialogue between the heads of the Hebrew University, students and homeless families on the subject.
 
Connecting East and West: the discussion focused on the question of whether to connect the struggle of the residents of East Jerusalem with the struggle of the homeless in West Jerusalem. The idea of organizing meetings between the Sheikh Jarrah families and the homeless Jewish families was proposed, out of the understanding that they are all victims of the same policy. Another proposal was to hold a panel with a diverse target audience from all parts of the city to present the city's housing issues from different points of view as part of a seminar on housing to be held at Bezalel on December 1.
 
Policy: this group discussed the existing policy on housing and the necessary changes in order to improve the condition of persons suffering from a lack of housing. The group agreed that government housing budgets should be increased and especially for public housing, which has not been constructed in the past 20 years. The group also discussed the criteria of entitlement to public housing. One of the conclusions was that while acting to change policy, the problems and needs of the homeless are so urgent and immediate that the issue must be placed at the forefront of the social protest campaign through its leaders. The group also decided to continue the dialogue between faculty members and the people in the field.
 
The squatters: this group included mainly the tent dwellers who occupied an abandoned building on Pinsker Street in Jerusalem for 30 days. The tenants raised their problems and urgent needs and considered possible solutions: a fund-raising event, asking the university to contribute surplus equipment, approaching youth movements and more.
 
The seminar was led by Etti Chen, one of the women leading the campaign for the homeless in Jerusalem.
 
To view a film about Etti, press here.

Faculty and Students' Work with Marginalized Communities in Jerusalem

Faculty and Students' Work with Marginalized Communities in Jerusalem, April 6, 2011
 

This study day aimed to present methods of community work within the framework of community-engaged courses – discussing dilemmas, challenges, and possible means of action. The various practices were introduced through the presentation of two courses supported by the Campus-Community Partnership, courses integrating work with marginalized communities in Jerusalem. Participants in the study day were faculty members teaching community-engaged courses, and representatives of institutions of higher education and of civil society organizations.

For a copy of the invitation, press here.

 

Dr. Edith Blit-Cohen, social worker Tami Gross, and social worker Orly Kuzin-Malachi, of the School of Social Work and the Faculty of Law at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, presented their work in the courses: "Marginalized Populations, Human Rights and Social Change" and "Feminism, Accessibility and the Law". These courses make up a joint program for social work and law students. The program brings together students and groups of underprivileged women. It examines the relationship of knowledge, accessibility to the law, marginalized populations and actualization of human and civil rights.

 

Dr. Blit-Cohen began the study day with a discussion of "Work with the Community: the Challenges of Partnership". She spoke of people's motivations for social change, the resources required to act for change, and the figurative barriers and hurdles that must be overcome for certain groups to become active. She then went on to draw guiding principles for action for community change and empowerment, including: understanding and acknowledgement, sharing and cooperation, attempt to avoid hierarchy and power relations, and belief in the community's ability to succeed, with an emphasis on the work process.

 

Gross and Kuzin-Malachi presented the program's practices, the ways in which the women's groups are conducted, and the manner in which this is based on the principles presented by Dr. Blit-Cohen. They mentioned the gaps in perception that exist between the students and the women in the underprivileged communities, the difficulties emanating from these gaps and the challenges involved in trying to reduce them. Further, they spoke of why students are seldom aware of their successes in the program, as it is easier for them to see their failures.

 

Architect Liat Briks-Atgar, lecturer in the Unit for (In)formal Architecture Studies at Bezalel – Academy of Art and Design, and Amany Khalefa, graduate student in Management of Non-Profit and Community Organizations at the Hebrew University, and coordinator at the Campus-Community Partnership, presented the work of the Unit with the community in Arab al Sawahre, a neighborhood in East Jerusalem. The Unit, which addresses the phenomenon of informal construction, architecture that is between the formal and the non-formal, attempts to understand the relations constructing space. It examines and maps construction in relation to the physical, social and cultural aspects of the surrounding environment. Students of the Unit, through dialogue with residents of Arab al Sawahre, prepare schemes for architectural involvement, taking into consideration cultural and social complexities.

          

Briks-Atgar presented the challenges that were part of the work process with the residents. She noted that the residents are in actuality a fragmented community, and that the constructed space reflects this fragmentation. In fact, the residents conduct themselves as individuals, from their private homes, and not as a group. In view of this fragmentation, the Unit has examined ways to recreate public, joint spaces, and analyzed ways in which residents share the city.

 

Khalefa, who guided the residents of Arab al Sawahre's relationship with the faculty and students of the Unit, offered three points for discussion: she explained how the discourse of regional planning and architecture is like another language, an academic and professional language that requires mediation between the students and faculty and the residents; she discussed the need for more comprehensive preparation and work processes for the students, as most architecture students do not receive appropriate tools in their studies for joint planning work with the community; finally, Khalefa referred to the significance of gender throughout the process of work with the community, stating that it is necessary to look at the degree of power and influence that the women may have or lack.

Developing Community-Engaged Courses

Developing Community-Engaged Courses, Tel-Aviv, December 15, 2010

 

The study day aimed to introduce Campus-Community Partnership, expose participants to two projects supported by the Partnership, and discuss possible initiatives in the field of community-engaged courses.

 

For the invitation in Hebrew, press here.

 

 

Presentation: Planning With Communities – the Case of Jaffa Gimel

Prof. Tovi Fenster and Architect Tal Kulka

Department of Geography and the Human Environment, Tel-Aviv University

Course: Planning, Sustainability and Human Rights Clinic

 

Prof. Tovi Fenster and Architect Tal Kulka presented the clinic, which is supported partially by Campus-Community Partnership, and partially by foundations. The funding by the Partnership is allocated mostly for student scholarships. This year, the university considered the course a research seminar, and respectively increased its credit points to 3 credit points. Students participating in the clinic are graduate students from the Department of Geography and the Human Environment, and undergraduate students from the Faculty of Law and from the Faculty of Management. The course integrates theoretical study, training, and fieldwork.

 

The course includes:

  • Application of bottom-up planning models – planning with the community.
  • Advancement of affordable housing projects, urban renewal design mechanisms and partnership with communities.
  • Work with the municipality, residents, and private entrepreneurs.
  • Action for practical and strategic change – change in everyday life and in-depth change in power relations.

 

This is the clinic's third year of implementation, and knowledge has been accumulated and transferred from year to year.

 

The clinic implements three projects: Jaffa Gimel, the Nevi'im (prophets) site in Bat-Yam, and Shem HaGedolim project in Jaffa. Each week students attend a theoretical-academic lesson, in which students are divided into three groups, each guided by a faculty member. During class the groups share and reflect upon their experiences. At the end of the course students submit a research paper that integrates theory and practice.

 

Background on the projects:

 

Jaffa Gimel – Residents of four buildings in the neighborhood turned to the clinic due to the fact they received "warrant #3" – requiring them to undergo "renovation at the cost to the residents" – a requirement they could not afford. With assistance of the clinic a solution was formulated – creating a partnership with a private entrepreneur, and transforming the project into a profitable one. It was found that adding two stories to each building would make the investment of structural reinforcement worthwhile. Yet, such a program may be problematic as the municipality might not issue a permit for the construction of two additional stories. Such a permit might set a precedent the municipality would reject. Students of the clinic suggested that the two additional stories would serve as dormitories for students of the Tel-Aviv-Jaffa Academic College, and this special position would allow the municipality to issue a permit for the plan. At this stage the clinic is guiding the residents through the planning and renovation process. One success of the program is the fact that the architectural plan submitted by the construction entrepreneur significantly changed as a result of resident involvement. The clinic's role is to represent the residents in their contacts with the municipality and the entrepreneur, and to position them as the principal target population of the project. In addition, the contractor has repaired the defects for which the municipality issued the warrant, which has now been removed.

 

Hanevi'im Site, Bat Yam – A project in which residents are evacuated from their homes and the buildings are renovated or demolished and new ones are built. The project is in its final stages. In fact, the municipality thought to involve the residents only at a later stage of the project, towards the end. The residents turned to the clinic, whose faculty and students are now investigating how to present their interests to the contractor that is already working at the site.

 

Shem Hagedolim Project, Jaffa – The clinic represents the residents in relation to different legal claims made by the municipality. Residents in the area suffer from different problems including poverty, bad health and other hardships. The clinic is advancing a holistic perspective according to which the problems are connected to one another. The clinic began to address the legal aspects of the residents' problems, and these days is also beginning to establish a community garden. Residents of this area are extremely underprivileged, and therefore scarcely turn to help. In this project the clinic is stressing the improvement of the environment while the original residents remain in their place.

Prof. Fenster and Architect Kulka stated that the residents of Jaffa Gimel and Shem Hagedolim are families and individuals who have been evacuated in the past.

 

Dilemmas that are raised throughout work in the clinic – questions related to representation between the residents and the enrepreneurs; "covert" participation in projects of outsourcing – what is the clinic's role in this?; questions of trust/loyalty: between the residents and the projects; short term change versus long term change; the special position of planning in the course. 

 

At the end of the presentation a discussion developed, during which several points were raised:

Questions raised by the audience related to the students' role in the project – what is required of them and what do they receive/gain from this involvement. In reply to these questions the faculty members answered that students have class once every two weeks, and that once every two weeks they have a meeting with their advisor. Throughout this time they are also active in the field. These projects are innovative and original and require students who are an additional resource for thought and knowledge. The average student does not have many opportunities for such encounters with the community, while in most cases studies are overly theoretical and do not provide room for applying what is learnt in reality. Within the framework of the clinic students receive a certificate of practical training that can later serve them in the labor market. Students learn how to communicate with faculty and students from other professional disciplines, as planning involves interdisciplinary work.

 

Relating to the characteristics of the fieldwork, Fenster and Kulka mentioned that there are differences between the projects. In Jaffa Gimel, for example, it was necessary to go from home to home with the entrepreneur's plan and listen to the residents ideas and opinions. There are also general meetings for all residents of each building and each entrance. The frequency of the meetings with residents changes according to the project and the work stage. The students are in touch with the residents also by phone, and sometimes personal relationships are formed.

The faculty members spoke of "strategic change" – feeling that changes are taking place, residents are taking initiative, and that the projects are encouraging them to become more involved and be continually aware of what is going on. The teams of the clinic work hard to build local representation.

 

An additional point during the discussion related to a fear that the work of students with underprivileged residents might be of a patronizing character. The faculty members mentioned that this is an issue that the students themselves are occupied with. The personal encounter, they said, restricts or limits the patronizing position, although it is very difficult, if not impossible, to be completely rid of this position. For example, they spoke of an uncertainty raised by one of the students – whether to write the protocol of the resident meeting on her lap top or by hand. Fenster and Kulka said they told her to do as she thinks is most appropriate and comfortable for her, and that it is alright for her to have a lap top. These types of issues are many times raised in class. Students do come with judgmental attitudes in relation to the residents, but once they know the stories behind the individuals, these attitudes tend to change.

 

Concluding the discussion, a question was raised whether it is not worthwhile to allow students to initiate their own projects. Fenster and Kulka replied that in their view it is a great idea but very different from what is currently done in the clinic. Organizing a new project takes time and it is difficult for every student to create his or her own idea each year. Often projects are continuous, while new students are integrated in the project each year.

 

 

Presentation: The Academy as a Platform for Social Change – the Haifa Partnership

Dr. Roni Strier

Department of Social Work, University of Haifa

Course: Methods for Community Organizing: The Haifa Partnership for the Eradication of Poverty

 

Dr. Strier presented the project "The Haifa Partnership for the Eradication of Poverty", a project which integrates the academic community, professional community (social workers of the public social services) and residents of underprivileged neighborhoods of Haifa. The project is based on the course "Community Social Work" which is considered a mandatory course (and is divided into several sub-courses, one of which is the participation in the project). In the past few years, the profile of project participants has not been defined, but there has been an equal proportion of Jewish and Arab participants. Students meet once every three weeks with a facilitator who guides their work, and are involved in the Center for Research on Poverty at the University of Haifa. In addition, they are active twice a week in work teams in the neighborhoods, work teams that integrate students, residents, and social workers. Work teams are currently concentrating on issues of electricity, food-safety, and affordable housing. Each work team is also involved in statewide coalitions in related issues. At the end of the year each work team produces a report that is then widely disseminated to decision makers. Further, as part of the project, conferences are organized, brining together all participants in the project and in related programs, and all stakeholders who are not necessarily directly involved.

 

The project's main objectives are:

  1. Creating communities of knowledge.
  2. Promoting solidarity in and between communities.
  3. Developing knowledge for social change.
  4. Developing young leadership for social change. From the outset, the project was formed in partnership with the social services in Haifa in order to influence the public service system and not to replace it.

 

The project is directed according to the following principles: partnership between all stakeholders while reducing hierarchies; engagement – learning how to "get dirty", and how to contend with mistakes and uncertainties; conscientization – instilling a "social conscience" in students and in all other partners in the project.

 

As part of the project we demand from students to "think big" in specific contexts – radical thought while proposing immediate solutions to everyday problems. We ask to develop practical knowledge that may be used in the field.

 

Following the presentation of the course, Dr. Strier added that although social work is "in his blood stream", he did not receive much support from the university, and not even within his department. He mentioned that the Campus-Community Partnership gave him the legitimation to continue with this work and alongside the conferences produced by the project this legitimacy increased. Today the project has been "recruited" to be the university's leading project. In a recent conference at the university the project was presented to the Minister of Finance and the Secretary-General of the OECD.

 

In the discussion that followed Dr. Strier's presentation, he mentioned that the students are the ones that profit the most from the project. He spoke of one of the Muslim students who told him that this was the most significant experience she has had in her life. The social workers also gain much from the project as they have an opportunity to reexamine their standpoints and their commitments. In interviews held with the students about their participation in the project they spoke of their participation as an important learning experience. Residents, on the other hand, remain very frustrated in many cases.

 

Further to a question from the audience Dr. Strier related to the work process with the municipality. He claimed that there is an internal pressure when working with the social services. The project, in actuality, exposes the social services' weak-points and they, on the other hand, perceive the university as detached and distanced. On the other hand, once the social services have a local community that is organized, they take a stronger position in relation to the mayor, and therefore they have certain interests in maintaining the projects. The mayor of Haifa is not social justice oriented, and when there are communities backing the social services they may have more impact when trying to influence municipal programs. This partnership, nevertheless, is exposed to political traps – for example, whether it is possible to publicly criticize the mayor? Work in partnership with the municipality raises diverse problems, and ongoing negotiations take place between all participants relating to the essence of the partnership. It is necessary to continually create new meanings in relation to the ties and identities in and between project partners.

 

When asked about principles or advice that may be applied to other places or projects Dr. Strier replied that the most important thing is personal ties. It is important to continually look for partners, not remain isolated, and not to fear actions that confront position holders and authorities. One must "think big" and "act small".

Gender and Planning in Jerusalem

Gender and Planning in Jerusalem, Jerusalem, October 24, 2010

The Partnership held a workshop on "Gender and Planning in Jerusalem". Faculty members from eight different courses and the NGO representatives operating in Jerusalem with whom they work, met to discuss common dilemmas and possible cooperation.

 

The main issues raised in the workshop were methods for community involvement in planning, types and definitions of community, or what actually constitutes a community, the colonial relationship between academia and the community in East Jerusalem, and barriers imposed by language and gender.

Community-University Partnerships in Conflict Zones

Community-University Partnerships in Conflict Zones, Jerusalem, March 4, 2010
In spring, a second study day for the 2009/10 academic year was held at Beit Breter, at the Givat Ram Campus of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The day focused on campus-community partnerships in conflict zones, hosting Dr. Juliet Millican of the University of Brighton, who has worked extensively in community development, community education and higher education in Europe, India and parts of Africa. Most recently she has worked with students in Bosnia and Herzegovina setting up learning opportunities across ethnic divides. Dr. Millican now works as development director for student community engagement with theCommunity University Partnership Program (CUPP). She spoke about what community-university partnerships might offer to societies undergoing or recovering from conflict. In the second part of the day Prof. Ariella Friedman facilitated a workshop about the personal, the academic, and the political. The day provided a forum for mutual exchange and learning about the role of the academy in a conflicted society, and how community engagement can work across divides.

Legal Perspectives of the Jewish Settlement in Sheikh Jarrah and East Jerusalem

Legal Perspectives of the Jewish Settlement in Sheikh Jarrah and East Jerusalem, Jerusalem, January 17, 2010
Last summer, three Palestinian families were evicted from their homes in Sheikh Jarrah and 25 other families received eviction orders. The Partnership therefore decided to extend its support, and initiate student involvement in the neighborhood which is next door to the University. The study day, held as part of this involvement, addressed the complex legal issues surrounding the Jewish settlement in the neighborhood. The event featured presentations by Adv. Talia Sasson, Adv. Sami Ersheid, and Adv. Salah Abu Hussein, and was facilitated by Prof. Alon Harel of the Faculty of Law at the Hebrew University. It was held at the University's Mt. Scopus campus, and was the first time that the Sheikh Jarrah families had ever visited the campus. The evening was a very moving experience, demonstrating the importance and potential of campus-community partnerships.
 
The student involvement initiated in the neighborhood has been a joint ongoing activity with the families of Sheikh Jarrah, conducted through the Minerva Center for Human Rights. Ms. Amany Khalefa, teaching assistant of the Minerva Human Rights Fellows Program supervised a group of six students working with the families of Sheikh Jarrah to record their life stories and provide a platform for their voices.
As part of the ongoing activity, a website documenting the stories of the families of Sheikh Jarrah was constructed - http://www.sheikh-jarah.org/.
To view invitation - press here 

Dilemmas and Possible Cooperation in the Haifa Region

Dilemmas and Possible Cooperation in the Haifa Region, Haifa, December 24, 2009
This workshop brought together faculty members from six community-engaged courses from the Haifa area, and the representatives of civil society organizations with whom they work in the framework of their courses. The objective of the workshop was to allow faculty and the NGO representatives to discuss common dilemmas, learn about the projects of other community-engaged courses taking place in the area, and consider and possibly formulate joint projects.
It resulted in the development of shared programs focusing on the work of three courses operating in the same mixed Arab and Jewish underprivileged neighborhood in Haifa:
  • Methods for Community Organizing: The Haifa Partnership for Combating Poverty, Dr. Roni Strier
    School of Social Work, University of Haifa
  • Planning with the Community: Concepts, Tools and Strategies for Action, Prof. Rachel Kallus and Dr. Emily Silverman
    Technion – Israel Institute of Technology 
  • Legal Feminism and Social Change, Adv. Dana Myrtenbaum, Noor Falach and Dr. Sagit Mor
    Faculty of Law, the Haifa Legal Feminism Clinic, University of Haifa

First Study Day for the 2009-2010 Academic Year

First Study Day for the 2009-2010 Academic Year, November 15, 2009
The 2009-2010 academic year opened with a study day held at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Mount Scopus Campus. The first part of the day was limited to study group members, and included a workshop on teaching community engaged courses in a multicultural classroom, conducted by Dr. Ariella Bairey-Ben Ishay and Moti Gigi of Sderot’s Sapir College. The second part of the day honored Partnership faculty members Dr. Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian and Dr. Haim Yacobi for their recently published books. Dozens of people attended this part of the day, which was open to the general public. It included a panel presentation by Dr. Daphna Golan, Dr. Amalya Sa’ar, and Dr. Neta Ziv, who discussed the new books, as well as responses by Dr. Shalhoub-Kevorkian and Dr. Yacobi. 

End of Year Study Day for Engaged Faculty

End of Year Study Day for Engaged Faculty, June 29, 2009.
A study day marking the end of the 2008/9 academic year was held at Beit Breter of the Authority for Community and Youth, at the Givat Ram Campus of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
 
Dr. Michal Schuster and Tamar Berenblum, teaching assistants of two of the Partnership's community-engaged courses, facilitated a dynamic workshop titled "Changing the World or Providing a Free Workforce? Creating True Partnerships for Social Change". The workshop was based on their presentation at the international conference "Higher Education and Civic Engagement Partnerships: Create, Challenge, Change", held by Campus Engage in Dublin, Ireland, earlier this month.
 
The workshop was followed by a discussion facilitated by Dr. Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian, faculty member at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, on the role of academic educators in directing students to civic engagement, and in becoming themselves active for social change. The discussion particularly related to the difficulties of teaching community-engaged courses amidst violent conflict.

Winter Seminar for Engaged Faculty

Winter Seminar for Engaged Faculty, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, February 11, 2009
A mid-year study day was held for the study group of faculty members and teaching assistants of the Partnership's community-engaged courses, this time hosted by the Department of Translation and Interpreting Studies of Bar Ilan University.
 
Prof. Miriam Shlesinger of Bar Ilan's Department of Translation and Interpreting Studies began the day with a presentation titled "Transformation Through Translation: Training Bi-Lingual Students as Interpreters for Language Minorities". She shared her experiences from three years of teaching the innovative "Community Interpreting" course at Bar Ilan University. In this course, students from a variety of language backgrounds (Russian, Arabic, English, Amharic, and others) are given a basic grounding in community-based interpreting. The students devote 4 hours a week to community interpreting at government agencies, hospitals, well-baby clinics, and other community settings.
Prof. Shlesinger discussed some of the dilemmas faced by the students, who by virtue of their position must represent both the Hebrew-speaking service provider and the disadvantaged minority groups. Students learn that interpreters in such sensitive situations are often confronted with conflicting demands of their "clients,” on the one hand, and the service provider, on the other. Yet despite the many challenges, students report an enormous sense of achievement, having truly been given the opportunity to make a difference.
 
The second part of the study day was devoted to brainstorming about teaching community-engaged courses, mentoring students, and developing partnerships with community organizations. The faculty members and teaching assistants shared their knowledge and experience relating to these elements of community-engaged courses. Further, the group discussed central lessons learnt from the first semester of the 2008/9 academic year.

Fall Seminar for Engaged Faculty

Fall Seminar for Engaged Faculty, Jerusalem, October 29, 2008
On October 29, 2008, the Partnership for Social Change held a day-long seminar for the faculty of its community engaged courses at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The seminar was attended by university professors from across Israel, as well as by community activists and representatives of organizations for social change.
 
The day began with a joint presentation by Dr. Roni Strier of the University of Haifa's School of Social Work, community activists Saki and Hava Ram, and former student Guy Feldman. The four talked about their experiences in the "Haifa project for combating poverty." The project brought together the academy (Haifa University), the municipality (Haifa's dept. of social services), and the community (local activists from poor neighborhoods in Haifa) in a partnership aimed at promoting the rights and welfare of poor communities in Haifa. The speakers spoke of the challenges in building such a partnership and the efforts made by all parties to achieve true equality between members. All speakers stressed the importance of developing a relationship between the academy and the community and the successes that the partnership achieved on the ground, especially with regard to educational rights. Residents of Haifa's poorest neighborhoods spoke of how for the first time, the university seemed accessible to them and important in their fight for greater equality.
 
In the second part of the day audience separated into groups for two parallel workshops. The first was led by Dr. Dalya Markovich, who teaches informal education at Beit Berl College. Dr. Markovich talked about the community engaged course she has taught for the past three years, where learning takes place both in the classroom and in social activism in the community. She spoke of how such a course opens a new window of opportunity for the students, and teaches them to think critically about education and social change. Many of the students continue to work at the organizations where they volunteered even after the course ended, testifying to its success.
 
The second workshop was led by Dr. Galya Zalmanson-Levi of the Kibbutzim College of Education. Dr. Zalmanson-Levi presented a three-level model of social change, at the pedagogic, organizational, and systemic level, and spoke of how the experiences of students in her community-engaged course on education for peace, social and environmental justice demonstrate the importance of pursuing change on each level.
 
After the workshops, the group reconvened to hear a talk by Mr. Moshe Aharoni and Prof. Faysal Azaiza of Israel’s Council of Higher Education. The two speakers addressed the growing field of service learning, both in Israel and abroad, and spoke of the Council’s commitment to promoting and expanding student engagement programs in institutes of higher education across Israel.
 
In all, the day provoked stimulating and enriching discussions about what it means to teach community engaged courses, and how the experiences of faculty and students in these courses can be further developed and improved. The next faculty seminar is due to take place in the winter of 2009.
For invitation in Hebrew, press here.

Social Responsibility of Higher Education Institutions

Social Responsibility of Higher Education Institutions, Tel-Aviv, March 22, 2007

The study-day Social Responsibility of Higher Education Institutions was initiated jointly by the University of Haifa and the Academy-Community Partnership for Social Change, with the support of the Talloires Network. The day consisted of two main parts. In the first part presidents and representatives of higher education institutions presented policy and programs in six universities and colleges – Haifa University, Tel Hai Academic College, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Emek Yezreel College, Achva College, Hadassah College, and the Academy of Music and Dance. The second part of the day, open to faculty members teaching or interested in developing community engaged courses, included presentations of two community engaged courses in the field of human rights.

 

Social Responsibility in the Academy as a Personal and Institutional Vision

In her opening remarks, Dr. Irit Keynan, Assistant to the President of Haifa University regarding Social Responsibility, described the path chosen by the University of Haifa, tying social engagement with students' academic courses, both in their specific discipline and through general courses that are specially designed to guide students' work in the community. Over 3,000 students out of 16,000 students at the University of Haifa are socially active. In addition to the development of courses, the university has allocated research grants, and initiated an annual conference on social responsibility.

 

The Global Network of Higher Education Institutions Committed to Social Responsibility, and Conditions for Joining the Network

Prof. Robert Hollister, Dean of the Jonathan M. Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service at Tufts University introduced the vision of the Talloires Network, which is an international network of universities and colleges that aims to strengthen the civic roles and social responsibilities of higher education. Prof. Hollister invited all participants of the study day to encourage the heads of their respective institutions to join the Network, and assist in shaping its development and collaboration. He also suggested that a local network could be developed in Israel, to strengthen and enhance current developments.

Prof. Hollister explained that the present time is one in which there is growing attention to social responsibility, including higher education institutions and university programs that promote student engagement and aim to be relevant to community needs. There are more and more programs developed in different countries, and growing regional and international higher education associations. Higher education is expanding, especially in developing countries, which is an opportunity to apply more academic resources to social engagement. Many models exist today, due to these trends, and therefore there are many programs that we can learn from.

The conference of university presidents held in September 2005 in Talloires, France, organized by Tufts University and Innovations in Civic Participation, brought to the formulation of the Talloires Declaration 2005, expressing the wish of the participants to continue to work together. In the Declaration, the members of the Network agreed to expand civic engagement and social responsibility programs, ensure the academic quality of these programs, create partnerships between institutions, communities, and governments, and exchange knowledge and raise awareness about the role of higher learning institutions in relation to society. Member institutions conduct a self-assessment of how civic engagement is integrated at different levels within the institution, as well as documentation of programs. The Network implements a global project on literacy, perceiving the challenges of literacy, broadly defined, to be universal.

 

Ms. Susan Stroud, Executive Director of Innovations in Civic Participation, and coordinator of the Network, emphasized that joining the Talloires Network requires that the heads of the institutions give their efforts and time to the membership. Membership in the Network has been based upon the model of Campus Compact that relies on the leadership of university presidents, on their personal commitment that is necessary to bring about change, to take things further after the assessment is conducted. Participation in the Talloires Network provides access to information, the opportunity to advocate together in affecting governmental policies, development of joint projects, and sharing of strategies and practices.

 

The Academy-Community Partnership for Social Change

Dr. Daphna Golan, Director of the Academy-Community Partnership for Social Change, spoke about the development of the Partnership. About five years ago a group of faculty members, students, activists, representatives of social change organizations, met to study the social action of students and the academy in the community, and how it might be possible to further encourage student activism. The group finally initiated a mapping study of student social engagement in Israel, which Dr. Golan directed together with Prof. Jona Rosenfeld and a group of students. The study found that there are thousands of active students throughout the country, but very little cooperation and sharing of knowledge, very few faculty members involved, and that these activities are not influencing the manner of instruction and research in the academy. Further, the study concluded that policy in this area has not been devised.

Following the study and its findings, the Academy-Community Partnership for Social Change was established at the Faculty of Law, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, to serve all institutions of higher education in Israel. The Partnership has cooperated with the Council for Higher Education that decided to support social involvement of students and the academy. Further to organizing study days for introducing community engaged courses and programs, and encouraging partnerships, the Partnership works to advance courses that integrate action for human rights and theoretical study. Dr. Golan spoke of the statewide seminar for student activists that the Partnership is holding in April 11-12 in Nazereth, to encourage the exchange of knowledge between active students throughout the country.

Dr. Golan shared her thoughts about questions and dilemmas that could be discussed during the study day: What should be the commitment of the academy? What are the significant ways of social engagement? What do we mean by social action of students? What do we want to change in society? How do we advance social engagement programs?

 

Dr. Irit Keynan, Dr. Daphna Golan, Prof. Robert Hollister, Ms. Susan Stroud

 

Part I: Presentation of Policies of Social Responsibility of Higher Education Institutions

 

Tel-Hai Academic College

Prof. Shmuel Shamai, Vice President for Academic Affairs of Tel Hai Academic College, presented the social responsibility policy of the college which is situated in the northern periphery of Israel, with 2,350 students, 75% of which are residents of the area. One of the college’s main objectives is strengthening the area in which it resides. Prof. Shamai spoke of the sound relations that were formed with the surrounding communities, which were very important during the Second Lebanon War - many of the students were involved in assisting communities around Tel Hai. A total of 25% of the students are active every year in community projects, with over 50% active at some point throughout their undergraduate studies.

Departments in which social engagement is integrated are: psychology, education, environmental science, and nutrition. The programs include ties with 30 communities in the area. Many students who are active receive scholarships, either through Perach (National Tutorial Project), or through the Dean of Students – Tel Hai College has one of the highest rates in the country of Perach scholarships. In addition to academic courses or other projects, Prof. Shamai illustrated how different college resources are accessible to the community, such as a special track for adult evening studies. 

 

The Hebrew University

Ms. Noga Zimring, assistant to the Dean of Students at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, gave an overview of the social engagement programs at the university, with the participation of Ms. Diana Daniel-Shrem, Director of the Social Involvement Unit at the university. The Hebrew University has some 25,000 students, and is perceived as an elitist institution. The array of programs at the university grew in various ways – from the inspiration of students, staff, and faculty members.

Some community engagement is part of the formal curriculum, in fields such as dental health and nutrition in which participation is mandatory. Other courses – in the school of public policy, business, women’s studies, and law – are elective. When students’ involvement is part of a course, it usually involves academic credit or a scholarship, and integrates at least four hours of community work.

Informal programs at the Hebrew University are implemented in the Unit for Social Involvement. Those involve mainly four leadership programs – social leadership, Arab – Jewish leadership, women leadership and educational leadership. The university also opens its gates to high school students to encourage them to continue on to higher education. University students guide high school students in their matriculation exams, and later in academic courses at the university.

An important step initiated by the president of the Hebrew University this past year, related Zimring, is the Social Involvement Committee, consisting of faculty members and staff in key positions that involve social engagement programs. The committee met this past year to learn about one another's work, with the aim of bringing together resources and developing new programs.

 

Emek Yezreel College

The Emek Yezreel College was introduced by Dr. Ronit Fisher, the new Dean of Students at the college. Dr. Fisher spoke of the college's objective of maximizing access to higher education for the residents of the northern periphery of Israel. The college student population totals 3,600 students. Dr. Fisher spoke of community engagement programs as implemented mostly through the social sciences – economic, media, sociology – and through the Social Involvement Unit. Following the Second Lebanon War, the number of scholarships increased in the north, and as many scholarships require students to be active in some social efforts, an array of new programs and partnerships were created to expand the possibilities of engagement. Most social engagement programs fall under one of the three main frameworks: promoting specific population groups within the academy, community projects developed by the Dean of Students Office, and projects implemented jointly with different NGO's in the area.

 

Achva Academic College

The unique policy of social engagement of Achva Academic College, a small college of 1,300 students, located south of the center of Israel, was presented by Prof. Yosef Zelgov, President of the college. Prof. Zelgov commented that while the location of the college is very much near to the center, the communities in that region are far away from the center, with many towns experiencing unemployment and social and economic hardships. The college grants some 550 scholarships to students who are involved. Residents of nearby communities are invited to lectures on campus, and children are studying media at the campus' radio station. High school students participate in academic courses through which they gain academic credit, while another program brings adults to complete their degrees, with financial support of the local municipalities.  

Another level of social involvement in the community is represented by four annual community engaged courses, academically based, for which students receive academic credit, while they are exempt from paying tuition for those credit points. For example, there is a course involving work with children with special needs, guided by a sociologist of medicine. Faculty members teaching these courses are also exempt from teaching two academic course credits that they are normally committed to teach.

Prof. Zelgov concluded by portraying his dream, in which a bicycle track that the college has initiated, between Kiryat Malachi and the college, will enable students from Achva to live in the disadvantaged town, and travel easily back and forth. Thus more students will remain in the nearby area during their student years, and have a more significant impact. 

 

Hadassah Academic College

Hadassah Academic College, a college offering degrees in a variety of career oriented programs (optometry, photography, hotel management, practical engineering, and more) was presented by Ms. Judy Habani, with the participation of Ms. Yael Lazmi, Dean of Students at the college. Half of the student population in Hadassah College, which totals 1,800 students, comprises of Jerusalem residents, while the second half comes from other parts of the country. Over 800 students who receive scholarships at the college are required to become involved in community work, preferably in their field of study. For example, optometry students are involved in eye examinations in various neighborhoods, including examinations of children in the Ethiopian community, and of senior citizens in homes for the elderly. Students of computer science are involved in Boyer High School in Jerusalem, helping a group of high school students develop a surveillance plan. Students of the college have initiated a volunteer project at a shelter for battered women, installing a computer lab, and work with both women and children at the shelter. This partnership has brought two women from the shelter to study at Hadassah College. Environmental health science students have become involved in one of the high schools in the city, teaching about recycling and making sure a foundation for recycling is set up at the school.

As most programs are related students' professional studies, they provides them with field experience that will be of help to them in their future jobs, serve as an advantage in the labor market. 

 

Academy for Music and Dance

The final words during this session were those of Mr. Michael Klinghoffer, Dean of Students at the Academy for Music and Dance in Jerusalem. Klinghoffer shortly mentioned several dilemmas that he has discussed with students who participate in a project he has initiated this past year. Through this program, music students form the Academy visit every two weeks in Ofakim, working with youth in the periphery town in the south, forming a music group there. Some questions raised are: What it might mean to be a musician and an agent of change? Is music not a manner for expression that comes instead of other ways or action? Will direct social action mean that certain emotions and thoughts will not be channeled through music, not find their way into art? Klinghoffer further spoke of other issues he discusses with his students, questions about the situation of the youth with which they work. If a certain student from Ofakim, as part of the program, participates in a statewide event, experiences an activity that is different from his everyday reality, what happens when he or she has to go back? Are some of these programs actually weakening the children’s environment?

An important element of Klinghoffer’s project is not necessarily the education of students, but education of faculty members, getting them to become more involved. So far several faculty members who have volunteered to give a single lecture gradually joined the project. This has impacted the atmosphere in the Academy.

 

 

The above presentations led to a discussion of the role of faculty members, and the apparent tension between research and social engagement. Dr. Golan mentioned that the Council for Higher Education has asked in its call for cooperation that institutions consider community engagement as a criteria for tenure – a step that will not be easy, but might lead towards gradual change. Prof. Zelgov of Achva College spoke of a current policy at the college of promoting faculty members who are socially active. Other participants agreed that there is no need to view research and engagement as dichotomous. Prof. Zelgov added that an atmosphere of social engagement will develop, and that will improve the ability to integrate social action with research. In his view, the more socially committed faculty members are also the ones that excel in research.

 

Participants also discussed financial support of active students. How is it possible to attain more scholarships? Is it right to require students who receive scholarships to become socially involved? In some cases students are in need of financial support, and cannot afford to volunteer if such support is not a part of the social engagement program. In other cases, requiring students who come from a low socio-economic background to be active, may place upon them unjustified pressure, as they are in a situation that generally requires more support. Participants agreed that there is a need to include some scholarships in all programs, and that it is necessary to advocate together for additional support of the Council for Higher Education in such issues, to enlarge the number of scholarships granted by the state that are not for Perach alone, as well as enlarge the number of scholarships granted for activities during the summer.

 

Participants furthermore spoke of ways to advance significant impact. One suggestion was to form a statewide network for cooperation and sharing of information, and for formulating joint objectives that can lead several institutions as a group. While some participants spoke of the institutions, and their numerous resources, others emphasized the students’ role in social action. Dr. Ronit Fisher focused on the students as the major resource of colleges and universities, and the need to transform their education so that in their future positions they have the awareness and the tools to implement change. Dr. Irit Keynan, on the other hand, stressed the difference in her view between students’ activities and the role of the institution in leading social responsibility. For this reason gaining the commitment of the institution’s president is imperative. Ms. Liema Davidovich, Dean of Students at Ruppin College, spoke of such a process at Ruppin in regard to social responsibility of the college. The management has asked business major students to examine several parameters of social responsibility and is anxious to get the results, and see what might need correction.

 

There are therefore several levels and strategies for integrating social engagement at each institution, and still a need to hold a more elaborate and in-depth examination. Dr. Daphna Golan offered that the Partnership hold additional study days for students and faculty members, events that could be hosted by institutions represented at the meeting. Dr. Aaron Back of the Ford Israel Fund suggested that it would be of great value for each university or college to work both locally and globally. The Partnership, as he mentioned, could be a resource to continue the learning process that has begun. Ms. Susan Stroud recommended that this group of representatives of institutions continue to meet, and that the coming meetings will focus upon describing what their needs might be. The local network could be a forum for debating, sharing strategies, sharing program syllabi, as well as for advocacy with government.

 

 

Part II: Community Engaged Courses for Social Change, Social Justice, and Human Rights

 

Faculty members who teach or would like to teach community engaged courses were invited to the second part of the day.

 

Gender and Human Rights

Dr. Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian presented the course she is teaching together with her assistant, Tamar Berenblum, at the Institute of Criminology, at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Gender and Human Rights – Between Criminology, Victimology and Social Action. Dr. Shalhoub Kevorkian focused on the way in which the course brings in voices from the margins and maps the situation of human rights in regard to gender issues. As she said: "We are opening a dialogue with theories, a dialogue with ourselves, with NGO's." In this way the course focuses on boundaries, and how it might be possible to cross them, to challenge them.

 

The students participating in the course are Jewish and Palestinian, coming from various disciplines and backgrounds. As part of the course they spend 4-5 hours in the field each week. They chose the problem that they wish to address following a meeting with the organizations which were chosen by Dr. Shalhoub Kevorkian. Most students in the course are graduate students, including two doctoral students, four of them are working in pairs, and the rest are working individually. Dr. Shalhoub Kevorkian explained that the students are assigned a great deal of reading, and are required to write a position paper during the year, and to write an academic article at the end of the year. The students receive a small stipend of $400 from the Partnership.

 

This course is different from other academic courses. Dr. Shalhoub Kevorkian spoke of starting each class with some music and poetry to open up new ideas and create a different atmosphere in the class, and further noted her interactions and support of the students throughout the week.

 

In reviewing the issues and chains which her students are tackling, showing a power point presentation of images that the students brought to describe their projects, Dr. Halhoub Kevorkian spoke of how the course:  "…asks whether human rights are enslaving others. It gives names to the chains".

 

Two students chose to advance the status of Agunot who are women prevented from getting a divorce according to the religious Jewish law. In Israel are close to 20,000 women living in this situation for many years. One student who is a legal scholar is working with Palestinian Bedouin women in the Negev, mapping with them the hardships that they are facing, discussing polygamy, and providing them some legal counseling, as well as collecting data that is constructed form their voices. She is trying to address social policy makers, and is able to form cooperation between several organizations. Another student focuses on women migrant workers who are many times sexually assaulted in the homes and families for which they work. The student is meeting with women foreign workers who have been assaulted, helping them organize, listening to their stories. She questions why there is no system that treats these women, no system that acknowledges what is happening to them. 

Other students volunteer in shelters for battered women, work to prevent sexual assault of children through the internet, and address the case of tenia capitis in Israel. Dr. Shalhoub Kevorkian stressed the unique viewpoints of her students, and the success they have had in organizing events and activating organizations. Some of the events, such as the one about tenia capitis held at the Hebrew University, gave voice to unheard people and brought together some seventy participants to an academic and moving event.

 

Dr. Shalhoub Kevorkian noted that the academy cannot work without the organizations, but also the organizations through the students' action gain access to resources such as questionnaires, research methodology, and more.

 

One of the main difficulties relating to the course is the academic institution itself. Many eyebrows are raised, many questions about the nature of the course. At the moment, Dr. Shalhoub Kevorkian is investing her efforts to ensure that the course continues next year. She concluded with the words: "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world."

 

Bureaucracy, Governmentality, and Human Rights

Adv. Yael Berda spoke of the course that she is teaching with Prof. Yehouda Shenhav, Bureaucracy, Governmentality, and Human Rights, at the Department of Sociology and Anthropology in Tel-Aviv University. As Adv. Berda mentioned, the course introduces a black hole, an area that is completely unknown to most people in Israel – the bureaucracy of the occupation. The course discusses the civil administration, the military courts, the practices of these places that are not public knowledge. Students in the course become involved in Machsom Watch and Yesh Din, both are women's organizations in which mostly women over the age of 40 are active. This introduces some interesting questions to the students: "How are they going to work their way with this age gap – in activism, in knowledge?" This relationship between the students and the active women was something that Adv. Berda mentioned as very surprising. Life looks different at different ages, and it is interesting to see how people of different ages can begin to work with each other and learn.

 

Other questions that the students had to deal with throughout the year are questions of privilege. At the beginning of the year they did not understand why they need to get up at five in the morning to go to the civil administration office in Etzion. Gradually they learned that activism is something that you try to put into your daily practice, not something you do in the university.

 

The students in the course mostly work in groups. They go to military courts, like Ofer and Salem, to traffic courts, and to Ashkelon and Petach Tikva where there are interrogation prisons of the secret service. These are places in which Machsom Watch and Yesh Din have managed to be witnesses in the courts to learn how they operate. Adv. Berda explained how the act of witnessing is allowing the students to learn, gain information about policy, better understand the system and in this way try to create change. They are learning to deal with the bureaucracy, while the course discusses administration and management theory, and procedural violence, in opposition to physical violence. By observing, the students are able to understand how gradually transformation can be observed from physical power to procedural violence. This concept is not easy to grasp. By meeting those who are part of the bureaucracy the students learn that they are meeting people who make decisions and have dilemmas, and maybe they can speak with them and try to push them out of their aloofness.

 

Throughout the year the students write a "captain's log", including their experiences and associations to the theories discussed in class. They are writing the log, but also writing towards a paper to be completed at the end of the year. Adv. Berda noted one of the students who described in his log a visit to the military court at Petach Tikva, a visit in which he was not listening, but only looking at what was taking place at the court. The student wrote that just by observing he can begin to think about relations of race and nationality in Israel, and how this is related to the bureaucratic practice and the occupation. 

Another student has decided following the course to write a thesis about the military courts, an issue which has hardly been written about academically. Adv. Berda spoke with enthusiasm about the students who are now speaking with others about what they are doing, speaking of their experiences in other classes as well. Many people at the university and outside did not understand this, and Adv. Berda and Prof. Shenhav found themselves explaining many times how this field experience is connected to an academic course. Adv. Berda expressed her hope that the course might push more students to go into public administration, once they understand the power of the bureaucratic structure. This is one of the ways to achieve change.




 

Group Discussion

The position of faculty members teaching community engaged courses, including the tenure and research systems of the university, were some of the concerns of the faculty members present. They spoke of the institutions that do not reward social engagement of faculty members. The perceived separation between what is considered academic work and what is considered social engagement or activism limits their ability to teach community engaged courses and invest more time in these efforts. Others mentioned the apparent apathy of the academy towards these programs, which seems to be more problematic. Adv. Berda stressed the need to make these courses become an integral part of the university’s active agenda. If institutions draw on courses and programs that involve work in the community to raise funds, faculty members should view this as giving the university the right to acknowledge and present the course. In the long run community engaged programs are a resource for recruiting students, and a resource for research. Dr. Shalhoub Kevorkian asked those present to be cautious of contributing to the university's use of these courses and programs for fundraising. Such use of the programs contributes to the exclusion and otherization of certain populations. The courses themselves need to make sure that they are not perpetuating certain processes of exclusion.

 

In discussing the way the academy itself regards community engaged courses, Ornat Turin and Dalya Markovich, faculty members teaching in teacher training colleges, spoke of their difficult positions. Students at teacher training colleges in Israel are mostly women of lower socio-economic status, Arab or Mizrahi background, and who generally do not have access to the university. Faculty members spoke of these colleges as being more conservative, experiencing greater difficulty gaining acceptance for community engaged courses. Many attempts are rejected, and some programs are not able to break the departmental barriers and create a course that is open to other students at the college. Haggith Gor Ziv, who has initiated the Center for Critical Pedagogy at Kibbutzim College of Education, disagreed and noted it is true that initiating such courses and programs is challenging, but with time things change and it is possible to influence the teacher training colleges as well. The Kibbutzim College of Education has decided this year that every student will be required to complete 60 hours of community engagement, with academic guidance, before finishing his or her degree. Eitan Shoker, faculty member at Bezalel Academy of Art and Design, joined Gor Ziv’s words of optimism, sharing the experience of courses at Bezalel that have developed over the years, saying that some things may even become a trend.

Prof. Jona Rosenfeld pointed out the connections that the courses make, connections between organizations, populations at risk, students and the academy. He stressed the need to listen to the students, to acknowledge their power, as well as the power of the voices of the outsiders involved. It is important to give voice to many things that remain unknown, but are happening to this society. Speaking with those who live in poverty, in communities that are excluded, said Prof. Rosenfeld, will enable us to learn of effective ways for working with communities and organizations. The lack of hierarchy enables the joint work of people from different fields.

Continuing the discussion of student power, participants raised questions of how to continue student activism in the future, how can we help students become part of an active community after their studies. Galia Zalmanson of the Center for Critical Pedagogy at the Kibbutzim College of Education, raised the need to relate to the power of students who come from the communities that are normally excluded from the academy.

Another side to students’ power to act is the trauma and pain that students may encounter through community engagement. Pain and harsh experiences are sometimes the price of raising awareness and engaging with community organizations. Dr. Shalhoub Kevorkian mentioned this as an issue that needs to be addressed more in courses.

One of the practical suggestions introduced in this part of the study day was to create access to information about courses through the internet. Mr. Eldad Cidour, who teaches a course Art and Activism in Bezalel Academy of Art and Design, spoke about the possibility of sharing material about courses in thewebsite which has been created for the course. It is an important venue also to form contacts between faculty members and students. This is an open platform that can be used freely. Dr. Golan suggested that another good way for faculty members to learn and share ideas is to visit each other's classes. Prof. Hollister reinforced the importance of visibility and communication of courses that are taking place. He pointed out the great number of syllabi that have been collected by Campus Compact as one way for pointing out the significance of community engaged courses.

Summarizing some of the major points of the presentations and the following discussion, Prof. Hollister shared his observations and insights. He commended the inspiring presentations, that testify in his view to the timeliness of the Academy-Community Partnership’s initiative. Prof. Hollister observed that the courses integrate multiple ingredients, which are powerful in the way they reinforce each other. These include the lectures and readings, direct experience, the production of work that is valuable to the community partners, and an event or product of broader communication (conference, policy papers, etc.). He disclosed his concerns about the challenge to reach a greater number of students, who normally stay away from courses that seem more activist or political – “How can we take elements embedded in classes of human rights and political conflicts, and introduce them into classes of students who are not so politically inclined?” Another issue that Prof. Hollister considered was the possibility to sustain the work involved in community engaged courses, which requires more resources. He asked how it might be possible to broaden their impact?

The issue pedagogy was also put forward by Prof. Hollister, who noted that he was happy to hear the discussion taking place earlier about the power of students. Community engaged courses are a manner of engaged teaching, which is a “route to quality”. Learning about and communicating the way these courses contribute to teaching and research is extremely important, and a good strategy of gaining the attention and support of university presidents.

Susan Stroud conveyed her impression of the courses, noting that it seems that the circle of people who are part of the conversation has began to grow. She encouraged faculty members to use the Partnership to facilitate a discussion about their needs, and to continue and widen the circle. She further stressed the importance of developing a community of faculty members who are committed to engaged teaching, and to thinking how it might be possible to go back and to transform institutions of higher education.  

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Committed Academy?

Committed Academy? Jerusalem, January 28, 2007
The study-day presented the initiative of the Academy-Community Partnership for Social Change to develop academic courses that integrate student social action, and to enhance cooperation between the academy and organizations working for social change. Professors, lecturers, deans, graduate students, and representatives of social organizations participated in the event.
 
In his introductory remarks, and throughout the day, Professor Jona Rosenfeld (The Unit for Learning from Success, Myers-JDC-Brookdale Institute) emphasized that the program aspires to influence various populations and target audiences, including institutions of higher education. It is important to remember that the academy needs to learn from the knowledge in the field, to promote its commitment to learn from the field. Although the program is currently in its initial stages, Prof. Rosenfeld added, it is important that every academic institution offer courses that tackle social ideas, with clear goals and values. The discourse and the knowledge in these courses should be based on direct contact with the field, with individuals living in poverty.
 
Dr. Daphna Golan, Director of the Academy-Community Partnership for Social Change, described the project’s development. It began with a group of faculty members, students, and individuals from organizations who examined ways to develop stronger ties between the academy and the community. The research initiated by the group found that many students are indeed socially active, but do not receive sufficient guidance, nor do they have the frameworks necessary for exchanging knowledge with other student activists. Further, the research found that there is no formulation of policy for support of social engagement at the various institutions, and few faculty members are involved in students' social action, and in their guidance. Moreover, students who participated in the study mentioned repeatedly that there is no connection between the academic knowledge and their volunteer experiences. The Partnership was created in an attempt to expand students' social action, and strengthen their learning by deepening the connection between the academic knowledge and their work in the communities and organizations. The research findings were presented to the Council for Higher Education (CHE), which responded positively, initiating a call for proposals/cooperation to engage students and faculty members in the community. The call for proposals was issued in the past academic year. The CHE described in the call for proposals possible ways through which the institutions could help promote the students’ activities. The CHE also provides budgetary support, distributed among the various institutions, based upon each institution’s report. According to the CHE's budgeting framework, one hour of a student’s work in the community is granted twice as much funding when accompanied by an academic course.  
 
The Partnership is currently active in developing academic courses and various partnerships between students and communities, and in supporting student activists in studying the social, economic, and political context in which they are active. Over the past year, the Partnership supported ten courses, out of 49 applications—elective courses, from various disciplines, which are not part of a formal practical training curriculum, and which we hope will create change not only amongst the students, the organizations, and the community, but also within the academy. This year as well, the Partnership is unable to support all those who apply. Nonetheless, we believe that the Partnership also has a role in creating a space where faculty can ask questions and discuss problems and tensions. Throughout the year, the faculty members and teaching assistants from courses which were awarded grants met periodically for mutual learning, as part of the support and guidance process.
 
Dr. Golan stressed that courses which integrate social action are not simple, but rather require intensive preparation and guidance. Research from the United States has shown that the learning through these courses is more significant, and that the students who participated in them were more successful, both throughout their studies, and subsequently. Participation in the courses influenced their decisions to pursue professions and careers that include community work. The courses offer a different pedagogy, allowing for dialogue with the professor, group discussions with classmates, and long-term work in groups. The courses are also an opportunity for reinvigoration of faculty members—they present the students and the faculty with new knowledge, offering them a view of a world with which they are not always directly acquainted. Dr. Golan mentioned that as a faculty member, her visits to the organizations in which the students work are extremely important, and she learns a great deal from them.
Participants comments related to the new connections that the courses offer, as they require knowledge that differs from accepted academic thinking. Dr. Ayala Cohen from Tel Hai Academic College mentioned the potential of these courses for building new bodies of knowledge, based upon the encounter between faculty members, students, organizations and the community.
 
Two of the courses which received grants from the Partnership were presented during the study day.
 
Dr. Nira Reiss presented the course that she is teaching together with Ornat Turin at Gordon College of Education in Haifa. The course, Active Involvement of Education Students in Women’s Rights Organizations, examines aspects of gender and class of female teachers and education students in Israel, and the relation of these aspects to the process of student training and integration in the education system. Among the course goals are: to inspire a critical, class-conscious and political perspective amongst the students, to awaken their curiosity in matters of gender, and to empower them as women, citizens, teachers, who will also frequently contend with gender education. It is important to the faculty members that the students develop an awareness regarding gender and class. The students in the class volunteer at the following organizations: shelters for battered women, Isha L’Isha (woman to woman), Kayan (being – feminist organization), and Itach-Ma’aki(women lawyers for social justice). They join the ongoing activities at the organizations, and do not create their own projects within the framework of the course. For example, students accompany groups of children in shelters for battered women, or guide women during the divorce process. In choosing the organizations, the Dr. Reiss and Turin felt that one important criterion was the organization's ability to take in the students and train them for any activities as needed. Another criterion was the bi-national makeup of the organizations’ staff, well-suited for taking on Arab and Jewish students. Dr. Reiss emphasized at the outset the national-cultural composition of the College, where more than half of the students are Druze and Muslim and Christian Arabs, and a large percentage are Mizrahi.
 
The course comprises of long meetings, including six introductory lectures on the following topics: human rights, feminism, women's status in Israel, and civil society organizations in Israel, and towards the end of the year, concluding meetings. In the introductory lectures, representatives of the organizations came to present their activities, in order to give the students the opportunity to choose where they would like to volunteer. The students work five hours a week in the organization during the academic year, and keep a journal throughout that period, intended to serve them in writing their seminar paper. In effect they volunteer in groups of two or three within each organization, but because of the geographical distribution, they are not able to work as a team in all activities. Dr. Reiss noted that the students’ journals thus far reflect the students’ lack of critical thinking and difficulties in writing, despite the satisfaction they express regarding the activities.
 
Dr. Reiss described the great logistical investment necessary for the course. The faculty members meet the students every week, speak with them, and guide them, in addition to the guidance provided by the organizations. One of the ways to integrate the work in the field with the theoretical work is the seminar paper that every student must write towards the end of the year. The paper is meant to aid in processing the data that was acquired in the field, in light of the theoretical background presented in the course. The faculty hopes that some of the activism, the relationship with the organizations, and the knowledge gained, will stick, and accompany the students in the future. They testify to the spiritual uplifting that surrounded the course during the first semester.
 
One of the questions raised in the context of the first course presented related to the students’ activities within the organizations: does it perhaps serve the organizations, but without any influence upon a broader change? Dr. Reiss commented that it is possible that not all of the activities in which the students are involved create ‘enough’ change, but they see the organizations as agents. In their opinion, the students’ action is meant to help the organizations bring about change, and therefore the students’ volunteer work is much broader than the specific activities which they perform. They are part of the general discourse and activism in the organization. On the one hand, Dr. Reiss said, she believes in the need to be modest regarding the students’ ability to change the reality—but on the other hand, they can become part of a movement. As educators, they will be agents of change within the schools.
 
Dr. Haim Yacobi described the course that he teaches together with Dr. Neve Gordon, at the Department of Politics and Government in Ben-Gurion University. The starting point of the course, Human Rights, Community, and Planning Policy in Israel, is that planning policy has a decisive influence upon human rights and communities. Planning is perceived as a neutral field, professional and broad, but this course attempts to present its concrete aspects, and examine how the planning policies are related to health services, land distribution, etc. Moreover, the faculty members believe in the importance of accumulating a basis of knowledge regarding planning in Israel, and particularly in the Negev. The course goals are also to increase the students’ involvement in social efforts, a desire that the students internalize their potential to influence and to change, and also to open up ways of change for the organizations, in order to foster change.
 
The course is comprised of three central aspects: the theoretical aspect, which includes theories of human rights and general acquaintance with the planning system; case studies, through which the connection between human rights and planning is demonstrated; and a practical component, which focuses on practical tools—writing position papers and policy papers. The attempt is to integrate theory and practice, within the students’ activities as well as in the course's critical viewpoint towards the organizations’ strategies of action. The course presents a broad range of approaches, and attempts to examine what, in reality, contributes to action. The students are involved in projects in the southern region of the country. The faculty members strove to work with a number of organizations involved in different fields. The students study of all case studies enables the creation of a third body of knowledge derived from work in a very specific area, with specific communities. The course’s structure tries to take into account a type of gradual learning, which will allow the students to make the connections between the course and their activities at the organization.
 
Sixteen leading students in the department participate in the course. They are very committed to the course and to the action involved, and indeed it is a demanding course, requiring five hours of work in the organization per week. The students are required to produce within the organization, as well as write an academic paper that conceptualizes the work and knowledge learned in the field. The students work in each organization as a group, not as individuals.
 
Dr. Yacobi presented a number of examples of the students’ activities. For example, they work with Doctors for Human Rights and the Institution for the Advancement of Deaf Persons, who are collecting data that has never before been collected, working together to map the unrecognized villages in the Negev, to determine where there are more deaf children. The project combines data collection with analysis, relating to a number of variables, with an emphasis on the location. Clearly, within this framework, the students are exposed to fields of knowledge and visit places that are new to them. The types of activities in which the students are involved also have an impact upon their position within their own group. For example, in this group that works with the deaf in the unrecognized villages, a prominent place was given to an Arab student in the group, due to her command of the language.
 
Students in the course also work at Commitment to Peace and Social Justice. In this project, they survey the state of employment in Ashkelon, as it relates to the Wisconsin Plan. The students perform quantitative field work, as well as learn about, and get acquainted with, participants in the Plan. The students learn about the planning policy in the area and its disregard of the employment aspect. Another group of students studies the issue of water and sewage in Rahat, as an example of a place where the municipal planning does not take into account the different life style of the residents, which leads to tensions and conflicts with the local authorities.
 
The discussions with the organizations began even before the academic year, and today the relations with the organizations are extremely intensive. The course’s teaching assistant is in ongoing contact with some of the students and organizations, and takes care of all the details. In this course as well, there was an attempt to check which organizations can best absorb and train the students. Dr. Yacobi noted that, to a great extent, the students work with the organizations, and not necessarily directly with the communities. The network of organizations is very important, in part because there is practical handicap—students cannot enter a project and lead change in two semesters. One of the goals of the course is also to accord students a critical viewpoint about the world of the organizations within the framework of the course, a method of thinking that is crucial for students who volunteer and who are generally interested in social action. The course, moreover, serves as a basis for getting acquainted with new organizations, and creating long-term connections with them.
 
Carlos Sztyglic, Associate Director of SHATIL (empowerment and training center for social change organizations), and one of the founders and supporters of the Academy-Community Partnership for Social Change, spoke about central principles in joint work with social organizations. In his introductory remarks, Sztyglic noted that the Partnership's challenge lies in the joint learning of a broad group of people, in creating a framework whose central resource is the accumulation of knowledge. Many different actors are involved in the field of social activism. Sztyglic emphasized, therefore, that it is important to point out the diversity, to recognize it, and to learn from it—a step that is easier to talk about than to perform. It is important to try to form ties between the forces, to examine different opinions and approaches, to examine how one deals with different things in the field. People know different things and learn in diverse ways; therefore it is important not to blur the differences, but rather to preserve the tension as something educational. Of course, one must also acknowledge the contradictions and the conflicts that are to be found in diversity. 
 
Sztyglic also mentioned the importance of substantial dialogue between the organizations and the academy—discussions of possible fields for joint action, where they wish to cooperate. When creating a connection between the two bodies, one can conceptualize it as the development of a contract, wherein both sides clarify their expectations. In working with organizations, it is often necessary to work on the practical level—to bring the discussion down to how to strengthen the connections on the practical level. For example, it is important to discuss the students’ orientation in preparation for their work in the organization. Sztyglic noted that in order to ensure the best possible relationship between the student and the organization, it is important to get acquainted with the place—its vision, values, goals, and organizational structure. It is imperative that the students will not be alienated from the organization’s environment, that they will have the opportunity to come into direct contact, as much as possible, with the organizations, so that they will be directly involved, and feel an integral part of the project. It is also important that programs that place students with organizations will ensure that the organization provides appropriate support and back-up, by having a responsible person who makes sure to be in contact with the students, and is accessible for advice. Finally, students who work in social action organizations should be integrated into innovative new projects, and should not just be involved in the ongoing work. In such a way, students can have an experience that also contributes in a tangible way to the organization. One can see this encounter point between the academy and the organizations as a starting point, not a “pool” that you dip into once, not a one-time and short-term event, but rather something ongoing and developing.
 
In continuation to Carlos Sztyglic words, questions arose regarding the number of organizations that one should work with per course. Dr. Golan said that in her course, students are invited to choose from amongst 25 organizations each year, but if a student is interested in working for a different organization, it is usually possible. However, experience has shown that the fieldwork is usually less successful than in organizations that were trained for working with students, and with whom an ongoing connection exists. Dr. Hanna Safran said that in the course that she teaches at the Academic College of Emek Yezreel, Women Leading Change, she asks the students to search by themselves for organizations, as part of the learning process. Sztyglic noted that SHATIL can be of assistance in sharpening the questions regarding work and acquaintance with organizations.
 
Other questions that arose during the discussion were connected to the thought process that guides the programs’ activities in the field. For instance, Michael Klinghoffer, Dean of Students and faculty member at the Jerusalem Academy for Music and Dance, explained that when his institution developed projects implemented in the periphery, they consider what they can do to change patterns in music education which do not depend upon financial resources. Therefore they do not invest in physical resources, but rather in knowledge, that will remain in the community.
 
The participants also discussed their ability to influence the students, to encourage them to participate in courses and social activities wherein the financial reward is not the central component. This led to a discussion about compensation for the students, whether to grant scholarships or class credit, and also about possibilities for increasing enrollment to the courses. Despite the fear that the students will register merely for the scholarship, it was noted that the lack of scholarships will bar students from a certain socio-economic status from participating in the program. Dr. Golan said that the model for student compensation should be developed in each institution individually, taking into account all the possible combinations. It is worthwhile for each institution to think about how to combine class credit and scholarships of the social involvement units—to create the combination that is best suited for each institution.
 
Finally, as Sztyglic concluded, there is a need to create a fine platform for the various programs within the institutions. Likewise, Prof. Rosenfeld added that there is an obligation to try and change the way in which the academy conceives of its role, and the learning process.
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What Does Student Social Engagement Mean?

What Does Student Social Engagement Mean? Sderot, January 17, 2007
The study day, “What Does Student Social Engagement Mean?” was held in partnership with Collot BaNegev (“Voices in the Negev”) an organization for social change active in the south, and Sapir Academic College. Students, representatives of higher education institutions in the south, and representatives of community organizations participated in the study day held at Sapir Academic College.
 
Goals of the Study Day
The discussion about students’ social engagement has gathered increasing attention over the last few years. Public, corporate, and philanthropic organizations are investing money in scholarships for students in exchange for social action under the auspices of the students’ academic institutions. In parallel with the expanding and diverse activities, a discussion has begun to develop regarding the goals of these activities, and ways to increase their significance. This discussion raises important questions and dilemmas related to social engagement among students:
  • Which student activities in the community should be encouraged?
  • Who will determine the goals of these actions?
  • What tools do students need in their activities?
  • Can student engagement contribute to social change, and not just preserve the status quo, and if so how?
 
The purpose of the study day was to discuss these questions and to promote a joint discourse between students, representations of institutions of higher education, and representatives of social change organizations.
The discussion examined these questions while relating to the academic aspect, the institutional aspect, and the practical aspect, against the background of insights that have already been formulated in the field.
 
The study day included three panel sessions, each lasting for about an hour and a half. At every session, participants of the panel discussed one central question. Afterwards, the general audience took part in an open discussion.
 
The sessions discussed three topics:
  1. The personal aspect of the students’ actions.
  2. The social aspect – actions that contribute to social reproduction versus actions that contribute to the creation of social change.
  3. The institutional aspect – the desired relations between the community and the academy, and the goals of student engagement programs.
 
Description of the Sessions and the Discussions
 
Session 1: The Personal Aspect in Student Action
The first session discussed the question related to the personal aspect of student action: what is the goal of social action on the personal level, and what tools and knowledge do students need during and after their activities. Mr. Dudy Natan, social activist and one of the founders of Collot BaNegev, served as the chairperson for this session. Participants of the panel were representatives of social organizations and organizations that work with students, with the aim of sharing their experiences and insights: Dr. Daniel de-Malach, Chairman of Collot BaNegev and faculty member at Sapir Academic College, Ms. Amal Elsana Alh'jooj, Director of Ajeec (The Volunteer Tent of the Arab-Jewish Center for Empowerment), Ms. Tami Schneider, Co-Director of Mahapach-Taghir, Ms. Camilla Lanskind, Director of the Unit for Social Engagement at Sapir Academic College.
 
The speakers focused upon the personal process that students undergo during their involvement in social action—in other words, the value of working for social change from the perspective of creating change among the students themselves, beyond the specific purpose of change in the community. There was general agreement regarding the need to raise awareness among the students, and formulate a political world view. Social change organizations choose to adopt an active approach towards raising awareness, believing that this is not a spontaneous process, but rather a process that must be made possible for the students. The integration of learning and action allows them to formulate a broad world view, on the basis of personal experience and action within the community. The action in the organizations allows students to experience a social reality that is foreign to most of them, and simultaneously allows them to analyze this experience and have an impact upon the field. As Dr. de-Malach said, social action within a political organization will allow students to undergo three stages: formulating a world view and vision, improving their capacity for self-awareness, and developing the ability to act.
 
Another fundamental conclusion of this session related to the group aspect in student action. All organizations noted that the creation of a group for the student activists, one that is both a social and a learning group, is extremely important in the process of raising awareness. Another central function of the organizations is the incorporation of student activists into the organizations alongside continual support and guidance, both in terms of their action and personal aspects, so as to foster healthy ways of dealing with conflicts that arise.
 
Session 2: The Broader Social Aspect in Student Action
The second session dealt with issues related to the social aspect in student activism. It questioned whether student engagement can contribute to change and social reform, and not merely maintain the existing reality. Ms. Galit Bareket Danielli, Director of the Southern Region at ISEF, chaired this session. Participants in the panel were Ms. Tami Schneider, Co-Cirector of Mahapach-Taghir, Mr. Mag'd al-Kamlat, Director of Step Forward (Association for the Advancement of Education in Rahat), Mr. Dori Rimon, Director of youth activities in Sderot, and Ms. Rosa Neve, Director of the Center for Parents and Children in Sderot.
 
The speakers on the panel and other participants debated the tension that exists between preserving the status quo and social change in student activism—how can social activism foster social change, and not just provide a particular answer to a specific need. The primary solution to this dilemma lies in awareness. So long as the specific activism comes along with the formulation of a general political world view, and is accompanied by self-criticism and reflection, deliberations, and integration between the political worldview and the activism, then the activism takes on a much broader significance. Social engagement gains meaning when it stems from a broad perspective of the society that one wishes to build.
 
Another aspect of translating specific activities into social change involves the tools that are given in the course of specific activities, and the creation of a feeling and belief in the ability and power to change. In order to create social change, one needs people who, in addition to being aware, believe in their ability to foster change, and have a basic tool-box to do so. An experience of awareness without the ability to influence is a frustrating experience which creates despair. The belief and the tools together constitute a firm foundation for any social change. Activists need a positive experience of change, and a feeling of tangible success, in order to continue in their activities for a just society.
 
The discussion raised another important point, about the tension between the particular change (related to the work of a specific organization, and changing the awareness of individual students) and the need for broad social change, and the influence of broad institutional mechanisms—changing the social constructs and the social power relations. Organizations see themselves as places for students to learn, and hope that even when the students leave the organizations, they will retain their political awareness which will accompany them throughout their personal and social choices. In such a way, a political worldview can be created in society at large, which will also grant it a foothold within positions of power in the establishment. (As Galit Bareket Danielli said: “We are a nest for social activists to grow, so that in the future they will leave the academy and make the changes that we are hoping for.”)
 
Session 3: The Academic and Institutional Aspect in Student Social Engagement
The third session discussed the desired relationship between the academy and the community and the goals for student engagement. Dr. Zvi Schuldiner, Head of the Department of Policy and Public Administration at Sapir Academic College, chaired this panel. Participants of the panel were Prof. Ze’ev Tzachor, President of Sapir Academic College, Dr. Daphna Golan, Director of the Academy-Community Partnership for Social Change, Ms. Hedva Radovanitz, Director of SHATIL Be'er Sheva, and Ms. Tal Levi-Segel, Dean of Students of Achva College for Education.
 
Participants discussed ways to change the atmosphere in the academy, and to encourage academic institutions to see themselves as committed to social change. In order to do so, it was agreed, there is a need to create a joint discourse between the academy, organizations for social change, and students, such as the discussion taking place in the study day. Only a joint discourse will create a shared social view, and parameters for cooperative and consistent work. Cooperation between the various actors should be anchored within the academy. As an example, it was noted that student activists in the United States are given priority in admission to advanced degrees.
 
Many other examples were brought up regarding academic courses that integrate social action, including legal clinics, where there is a feeling that significant social change is being created. Such courses also constitute a microcosm of a joint discourse between organizations, students, and the academy.
 
An important point raised emphasized the fact that the academy also benefits from these partnerships, and so they should not be portrayed as one-sided, wherein the academy provides its resources for the benefit of the community and does not receive anything in return. The connection between the academy and the community allows it to become exposed to the field, and to make further connections between academic knowledge and the field. Prof. Tzachor related that he first understood the essence of the circle of poverty when he spoke with students who told him about a case of a woman who came to them for financial advice during the course of their activities in an organization for social change. In this regard, the students constitute a type of bridge between the academic world and the social reality.
 
Representatives of the institutions for higher learning noted that they have no doubt that student activists who receive proper guidance have a most significant action and learning experience, one that has ramifications upon their general learning experience, and helps foster sensitivity and critical thinking.
 
Conclusions from the Study Day and Thoughts for the Future
The goal is to continue to examine the questions raised during this study day, and to create a joint and in-depth dialogue between the various parties. A number of participants emphasized this need during the course of the study day; an eagerness could be discerned for dealing with these essential questions, and for continuous joint discussion.
 
Two Ideas for Promoting the Continuation of the Discussion:
  1. Transforming the study day into an annual conference that discusses questions of social engagement, in light of the issues on the agenda at the time.
  2. Establishing a round-table in the South in which students, social change organizations, and representatives of institutions for higher education will participate. Such a forum will meet on a more regular basis, and discuss more continuous issues and dilemmas involved. It can be a fruitful platform for cooperation and the creation of a joint agenda. During the study day, Ms. Hedva Radovanitz offered SHATIL’s assistance in establishing such a forum.
 
During the course of the study day, many questions and topics surfaced that merit continued discussion. These topics include, among others:
·     How do we reach more students and allow them to experience change in social thought and awareness?
·     What can be considered significant student engagement in an organization for social change?
·     How do we ensure that the responsibility that the organizations take upon themselves does not merely allow the state to evade responsibility, based on the welfare system?
·     How do we create a comprehensive system of guidance and training?
·     How do we create for the students a significant group of colleagues?
·     The creation of an approach that connects between the field and the academic institutions in a more binding way.
·     The feeling of an ‘obligation’ versus the feeling of a ‘right’ amongst students, the creation of solidarity.
·     The creation of a joint worldview and a shared vision of a “different society.”
·     Contending with the fear of political activities within academic institutions.
·     Cooperation between the academy and the organizations in constructing a theoretical-sociological program that guides students in their work through social change organizations.
 
 For the invitation in Hebrew, press here.
 For the program in Hebrew, press here 

 

Learning from Success

Learning from Success, Tel Aviv, June 26, 2006
The workshop focusing on Learning from Success took place in Tel-Aviv. Among the participants were faculty members, students and activists who discussed their success stories in projects engaging the academy with different organizations and women in the community. The meeting was conducted as an interview, designed to learn about the actions involved in the success stories presented – what did the activists, students and faculty members do in order to promote their goals. Prof. Jona Rosenfeld from the Learning for Success unit at Myers-JDC-Brookdale Institute and member of the Academy-Community Partnership for Social Change steering committee, guided the learning process. Members of the panel included: Hikam Araide, Omaima Saker, Nanny Balas, Odette Falach, Adv. Dana Myrtenbaum, Adv. Ronit Haramati-Alpern, Yafit Poled and Dr. Hanna Safran.
Prof. Rosenfeld introduced the Learning from Success process, explaining that it involves retrospective learning and perceives people as knowledgeable by virtue of their work and actions. The knowledge within each and every one can be unveiled through the stories. This discussion does not aim to explain, but to elaborate on what was done, thereby revealing the actions that lead to success, which are not always self-evident. This also allows the participants to find similarities between the different stories. The rest of the discussion was held in light of the question raised by Prof. Rosenfeld at the beginning of the meeting – what is social change? What constitutes a success in the field of social change?
The first stories to be discussed were those of participants in the "Legal Leaders" program, which draws on the collective skills and resources of different organizations and NGOs. The main partnership in the program is between "Itach-Maaki" organization and the Legal Clinics in Haifa Universitytogether with SHATIL (Israel's leading capacity building center for social change organizations) and the Haifa Bar Association. Attorneys Dana Myrtenbaum and Ronit Haramati-Alpern provided some background about the cooperation between "Itach-Maaki" and the Legal Clinics, and described the process Dana facilitated to bringing all the organizations and institutions to become "a part of a revolution".
In the first stage, 16 women leaders from different communities, Jewish and Arab, joined the program. They attended a three-month training course, during which they acquired tools in community organizing: mapping community's needs, working with the media, and so forth. The leaders were then joined by a group of 16 female law students, who participated in an elective seminar on "Legal Feminism" during the academic year.
Throughout the year, all 32 participants met once a week for three and a half hours each time, under the guidance of Dana Myrtenbaum and Odette Falach – psychologist and group facilitator. Most meetings took place at the university, yet several were held elsewhere, thereby reinforcing the program's dynamic nature. The large group meetings also included work within the project teams. Each project team consisted of two law students and two legal leaders, and promoted an issue which they chose to tackle. The topics for each project arose from the participants' personal stories. The plenary meetings' program was dynamic, and involved introduction and team building activities, goal verification exercises, exercises dealing with communication patterns, etc.
In addition to the abovementioned meetings, individual guidance was provided to the participants. All women participating in the program had a mentor and received guidance, to ensure that none of them works alone. The teams met regularly with Dana and Odette for team guidance sessions where they discussed dilemmas arising from their work, the relationship within the group, as well as the progression of their projects. The cooperation between the students, the legal leaders, and the instructors helped identify structural problems related to the project in general, and to the issue each team chose to advance in particular. All teams also established steering committees for their projects, whose members met regularly to guide and recommend new goals.
Odette presented her own experience of working with the group, stressing the importance of listening, and of posing questions that will contribute to the women's actions. She worked with the participants on finding their points of strength, on proper task role allocation within the group, and necessary skills and rules for cooperation.
Three group participants, Hikam Araide and Omaima Saker (legal leaders) and Nanny Balas (law student) took part in the panel discussion. All three are part of one of the seven teams formed by the program. Their team works to promote the rights of female divorcees in the Druze villages with the aim of influencing the rulings of Druze courts and achieving full rights for these women. Hikam began her involvement in this field in Isifya and Daliyat Al-Karmel, prior to her joining "Legal Leaders". She was driven by her own experience as a divorced woman. Hikam told her personal story to the group of women with whom she met regularly. She spoke with them about the ways in which she dealt with problems of housing, economic hardship, and infringement of other rights which were the result of the divorce and the court's ruling. Working alone at first, Hikam was later joined by Omaima, and together they established a support group for divorced women, who still meet regularly in Isifya for peer study and sharing of experiences. The support group strives to provide women with legal knowledge, economic empowerment skills, ways of coping with children in the divorce process, and more. The group, which includes twenty women, meets every two weeks. Its meetings are often joined by educational counselors, lawyers, social workers, psychologists and others. Hikam and Omaima have also done work outside the scope of their group, trying to change the religious leaders' attitudes concerning the matter of divorce, and eliminate the dependency that divorced women are forced into, dependency on their family, and on the welfare and employment agencies. The group currently serves as a support group on a wider basis, meeting for social occasions, day trips and so forth. The team mentioned that a substantial change among the participants may be noticed, mostly in terms of independent thinking and empowerment.
One of the methods which the team used was the distribution of a questionnairedesigned to map the needs of the divorced women, and better understand the problems they encounter, and the issues that should be focused upon in order to assist them. The questionnaires were circulated in many Druze villages in the North of Israel and in the Golan Heights. They were used in working with the women but also in providing religious leaders and welfare authorities with information and data concerning the problems of divorced women.
The program's vitality, says Nanny, lies in its encouragement of grassroots leadership. Through the course, the students are able to experience the courage of the legal leaders. She described how the students guide and support the legal leaders' vision, the design of a framework for action, and further utilize the legal skills they have acquired. They examined which legal aspect prevents divorced women from receiving full rights, reviewed the questionnaires with the attempt to identify obstacles, and brought the matter to the attention of individuals involved in the field.
In contrast to the group activities described above, Yafit Poled, a student in the Kibbutzim College of Education described her success story working with one child. Yafit volunteered in the Mahapach-Taghir NGO in the Tel-Aviv neighborhood of Florentine, as part of a critical pedagogy class she attended, taught by Haggith Gor Ziv. Yafit worked with a group of students, who served as mentors to children suffering from emotional problems. In the stage when the volunteers decided who shall mentor which child, Yafit was chosen by a child who was unable to communicate with the other students. Despite her initial concerns and by using consistent responses and tenderness, perhaps opposed to what the child expected of her, Yafit was able to build a relationship with him, thereby starting a process that changed his attitude to those around him. As Prof. Yona Rosenfeld put it, she acted out of love, without definitions or text-book explanations.
DrHanna Safran also described the workshop she teaches in theEmek Yezreel College – "Women Leading Change". The course discussed the ways in which women's organizations operate, and includes a stage during which the students are requested to find a woman's organization in which to volunteer for sixteen hours. In order to let the students understand, even if only partially, the feeling of a woman in need of help, Hana does not tell her students which organizations are available, but sends them to locate such organizations themselves. Through the search process, students understand the difficulty in finding the organizations which by nature should be most visible and accessible, especially for those in need. After locating an organization and volunteering there, the students return to the workshop, where they describe the organization in which they volunteered, and analyze their experience, in light of the theories and research studied in the first semester. Dr. Safran believes that the most important outcome of the workshop is that many of its graduates come to understand that feminism is an issue that concerns all and matters to all, and does not entail bringing about social change for women alone. The students' final project includes an analysis of the organization and its actions, and is later submitted to the organizations themselves, for future use. These papers often assist and support organizations in documenting their own activity – a time-consuming task that most organizations have a hard time allotting sufficient resources. 
The second part of the Learning from Success meeting was devoted to an open discussion, where several important points regarding these success stories were made. The first is the importance of difference in cooperation between organizations, people, ways of working, and unique, creative responses. A related issue is the significance of working in circles as opposed to individual work – the social networks created in the process contribute to broadening the scope of activities and provides more resources for all involved. This is why the mentoring provided to the participants is crucial. Another point raised is the participants' ability to put the learning from success process into action, i.e. their ability to examine things independently and learn from their experiences, to develop a fresh view of things and to identify their powers and their ability to make a difference. Further comments were made regarding the pedagogy of courses involving social activism, as a new method of student participation. In certain ways, such courses are very effective in teaching theory and in bringing together the interests of the academic world and those of society, which is beneficial for both sides. On the other hand, the speakers mentioned difficulties arising from such courses in terms of academic recognition, lack of resources and reference materials and problems with publications and theoretical conceptualization.

Workshop on the development of courses that integrate action of students promoting human rights and social justice

Workshop on the development of courses that integrate action of students promoting human rights and social justice, Jerusalem, January 8, 2006
The workshop discussing the development of community engaged courses was held in Jerusalem, and attended by faculty members, deans, members of social involvement units at institutions of higher education, representatives of social change organizations, and students – all from different institutions around the country. The participants also varied in their fields of instruction and research – archeology, geography, feminism, art, Judaism, law, social work, and more. The day was divided into two main parts. In the first part Dr. Daphna Golan-Agnon, Director of the Students and Academy for Social Change Forum, presented the main findings of the mapping study that led to the establishment of the forum, as well as models of academic courses that integrate social action of students. In the second part of the day Prof. Arthur Keene of the University of Massachusetts - Amherst shared his experience in developing community service learning courses and reviewed examples of such courses taught at his institution.
The founding of the Students and Academy for Social Change Forum was the outcome of a study group comprising students, faculty members and other individuals active in social change organizations, who met at the Minerva Center for Human Rights at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. The study group evolved into a steering committee that initiated a research mapping the social involvement of students in the framework of higher education institutions, social organizations, and local initiatives. The mapping research examined different questions, among them: what are the various activity frameworks? Do higher education institutions promote and support student community service, and if so how? How are faculty members connected to student community service and social activities? How should the needs of the community in which the students are active be mapped? All these issues derived from three general questions: what is the contribution of the social action to the students themselves?  What is the contribution of their social action to the community?  And what is the contribution of students' action to the faculty members and the academy?
Dr. Golan-Agnon provided an overview of the main aspects of the mapping research, including in the presentation the students' voices. The active students reported impacts on the personal level, experiences that led to personal change, and afforded encounters between different social groups that normally interact on a limited basis. The social action of students primarily involves work with children and youth, community work and education for rights – all areas in which the community benefits from the involvement. Throughout the students’ activity new opportunities are created, relations develop, and assistance is offered beyond the scope of the activity initially determined. However, higher education institutions in general do not educate towards social involvement, and do not view such activity as something that contributes to the academic knowledge, although the students' fieldwork has the potential to make courses and research more relevant, and presents a significant source of knowledge.
Dr. Golan-Agnon focused on ways through which the various institutions can encourage the social involvement of students: academic guidance that links academic knowledge with work in the field, training and guidance, and rewards and long-term planning. Active students receive guidance from the social involvement units or other frameworks through which they are involved. Yet, necessary guidance does not exist in all programs, and is not available in the frequency required to allow meaningful learning and action. Students who participated in community engaged courses spoke of academic guidance that links action in the field to academic knowledge, thus making their action and participation more aware and sensitive. In the framework of a community engaged course students emphasized the value of the group, the ability to examine issues with a group of peers. Training in the organization itself is also necessary support – in some cases training is insufficient and students do not have a person in the organization with whom they can consult. Furthermore, rewards and long-term planning are also essential to rendering the activity more effective. Lack of continuity in students’ activities, such as in tutoring and mentoring programs, is unfair to the children, and does not contribute as much as a long-term and comprehensive program could. The summer season is particularly problematic – for the most part, no consideration is given to what happens in the summer after the students leave.
 
The findings of the mapping research led to the following recommendations: rewarding the higher education institutions to encourage their commitment to the community; increasing the number of “Perach” (tutorial project) scholarships according to the Government’s decision of December 1988; pooling of resources on the institutional level; leveraging the subject through publicizing existing activities; and forming organizational frameworks for promoting the subject on the national level. Resource pooling and forming new frameworks will contribute to exchange of knowledge in the institutions and between the acting organizations and bodies.
 
In the first part of the day, Dr. Golan-Agnon asked students who participated in community engaged courses to impart their perception and share some of their thoughts about their experiences. They spoke of a different kind of interaction between the professor and students, a different kind of support; about the important learning that takes place when trying to examine which theories correlate with the reality observed during their work; about encounters that occur in the course between students of different backgrounds; about the course as place for clarifying attitudes and opinions; and about the importance of the course in guiding the planning process and in overcoming obstacles. The courses allow reflection that encourages change rather than social reproduction. They enable initial translation of knowledge into power.   
The discussion held in the first part of the workshop surfaced difficulties in designing programs that lead to change, and in proper guidance of students throughout their work in the organizations – understanding that these type of courses require greater responsibility and time. Other difficulties that arose pertain to the status of the researcher in the faculty at which he or she teaches, and in the academy in general, in comparison to his or her position in the community studied. Change in one position or aspect influences the other.
Other questions were raised in regard to the existing knowledge about community engaged courses, and design of such programs. Most organizations do not document their work systematically, and overall, social action is not widely documented. In continuation, concerning the contribution of social involvement to academic knowledge – comments were raised about the need for a framework that will lead the academy to better recognize the potential contribution of social action to research and to the academy at large. There is also a need for pedagogical writing in the field, and for the formation of cooperative projects and learning.
A short session in small groups took place following the first part. During this session participants described their experiences in the field, and raised more questions for discussion.

 
Prof. Keene, an anthropologist, has been facilitating seminars for faculty members for several years, with the aim of developing and adding a social involvement component to the courses they teach. Thus far, 175 lecturers have developed over 100 such courses at University of Massachusetts - Amherst, and those faculty members who received grants for developing the courses are committed to teaching them for at least three years. Prof. Keene described how his personal history, as well as his areas of interest – citizenship, community, and social justice – led him to engage in this activity. In the wider context, in the past several years questions have been raised regarding the decay of democracy in America, and the issue of social responsibility has also been raised in relation to the history of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Several hundred universities in the United States received upon their establishment a land grant subject to their agreement that they train and educate residents of the community, and serve its needs in return.  Throughout the years, relations with the community changed, and today scientific research is the top priority of these universities, as it is in other institutions, although the relations with the community may yet change. Thus, universities founded by means of a “land grant”, the University of Massachusetts – Amherst among them, are reexamining their relationships with their environment. Prof. Keene mentioned that in the past twenty years the trend in the United States is to create partnerships between campuses and the communities in which they reside.
The model presented by Prof. Keene combines three main components – academic content/ knowledge, service/ activity in the community according to a defined need, and guided reflection integrated in an academic course. The combination of the three, their common denominator, is the focal point of Community Service Learning (Prof. Keene used this term to define courses that integrate social action, while mentioning this term is not consensual and that other terms are used alternately by different parties – Civic Engagement Courses, Community Based Learning – and they too are contested). The combination between the three components is what influences the students most deeply, and leads to involvement and change in their perceptions and actions. He claims this is evident either in the manner the classes are conducted, or in the activities students take upon themselves beyond the formal course requirements. In some cases the courses themselves demand different conduct. Prof. Keene described the unconventional practices in his classes. His lessons include group work, thus generate more active participation than usual in the academy (students who participated in one of Prof. Keene’s courses subsequently designed their own course in which they study independently). This is also done based on the perception that class dynamics are directly related to the manner of action in the community, especially in civic activities.
The first course Prof. Keene presented is one in which the social action component was added as a solution to an urgent need in Amherst. The city council approached Prof. Ventura Perez, expert on violence at the university, when a group of disengaged youth began harassing senior citizens near a center for retired citizens in town. Although there are youth programs in Amherst, about 20% of the teenagers do not participate in them, among them a group of disengaged youth. Prof. Perez and a group of students agreed to act and opened a youth club in an apartment donated by the city. The students operated the youth center, giving the youth a wide degree of freedom in deciding the place’s appropriation and organization. The students worked on an entirely voluntary basis for four years. This is an example of successful intervention that contributed immensely to the youth, the city, and the students. The encounter between the students and teenagers raised many questions concerning violence, the connection of alienation and exclusion to violence, and the way teenagers react to authority. All these questions were discussed in Prof. Perez’s course. Other questions that were raised pertain to processes that occur in societies that are not poor. These questions led the students to deal more broadly with issues of citizenship, and the responsibility of the community towards all its members. The course incorporated structured reflection that relates between the theoretical knowledge learned in the course and the students experience in the field. The work within the course even resulted in one of the students establishing a youth council in the city, a body that did not exist earlier, so that it would be possible to outline more comprehensive policies regarding youth. Teenagers also participated in the process of forming the council and so they too were required to adopt new practices. Thus, a wide circle of people learned about the power it has to influence and change things.
Another course at the University of Massachusetts - Amherst is taught by Prof. Sastry, faculty member who researches nuclear physics. As part of the course Prof. Sastry's students test for radon in different parts of town, and raise awareness of the matter. Along the theoretical and technical aspects of the procedure, the mere act of going out to test buildings in the various neighborhoods brings up questions concerning the responsibility of scientists as citizens who posses knowledge that is not accessible to the entire population, as well as health implications.
Prof. Keene also presented the course he teaches on grassroots organizations in the community – the way poor communities deal with poverty without the help of external associations and organizations, but by utilizing resources found in the community. This course provides more theoretical background to the students, while during spring break they travel to live and work in a Virginia community coping with dire poverty. There the students work with a grassroots group that has struggled for eight years to bring running water to the African-American neighborhood in town. The stay there comprises work, as well as a significant learning experience. In the past years the community organization has worked to make the residents owners of the houses in which they live. The students participating in the project work in renovating or rebuilding the houses. They also meet and work with the youth and children. Throughout this time references are made to issues that have been discussed in class throughout the year, there is an attempt to link the theories and observed reality. The fact that their stay is short is problematic – the faculty members acknowledge and refer to this. They also attempt to bring up the students' biographies in the discussions, to expand the reflection in regard to the relationship with the community. According to Prof. Keene, the local organization chooses the type of activity in which the students engage, and even if their stay were extended this would not necessarily have changed. The mere participation of students in the activity, their familiarization with the organization and the community, educates them, raises their awareness, and influences their future choices as people who will be active in other organizations and communities.
Prof. Keene’s courses are offered in the format of seminars and in fact are not “conducted” by him but rather in cooperation with the students. Everyone is responsible for participation and progression of the lessons; everyone undertakes to be both teacher and student. Students from all departments and years may register, however, there is an application process the purpose of which is to assure that only students who are willing to invest efforts in field work will be selected, and also to create a socially heterogeneous class. Marks for the course are given for the learning and not for the fieldwork component. The framework is based upon a contract between students and faculty members, while participation in compliance with the contract guarantees a certain mark, and only breach of the contract, or outstanding work may change the mark.
At the end of the second part of the day questions were once again raised concerning the distinction between work that is meant to help and aid, and work that is oriented towards social change. The importance of the model presented by Prof. Keene is in how these courses change the learning style, and also how they bring students to consider actions towards change rather than help. They touch upon issues that influence students' social and political thought. In this sense, the courses focus on the personal development of students as such that will lead them to alternative actions and change in the future. It was also mentioned that there may be a continuum between aid/service and change, and that the courses have developed along this continuum, which is appropriate and worthy as part of a learning framework.
The development process of projects on the institutional level was also contemplated. Prof. Keene spoke of the need to start mainly with the leading faculty members in each field, especially those who are considered good teachers among them, and establish a study group for faculty members. Following this there were referrals to existing materials, training, and the importance of having different faculty members present their programs, to enable learning more about existing courses.
To view invitation, press here.

Study Day on Academy-Community Relations

Study Day on Academy-Community Relations, The Council for Higher Education, Jerusalem, November 27, 2005

The study day was dedicated to investigating possible ways of integrating student social action and academic learning, the focal point being a lecture by Prof. Marshal Ganz, who introduced a model he has developed at Harvard University.

The study day comprised two main parts. The first was facilitated by Moshe Aharoni, in Charge of Special Projects at the Council for Higher Education, and Secretary of the Planning and Budgeting Committee's Steering Committee on the issue of social involvement of students and the academy in the community. This part was open to an audience of individuals from various higher education institutions, included a presentation of two initiatives and of activity in the field, and a keynote lecture by Prof. Marshal Ganz from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. The second part of the day was conducted as a workshop for faculty members interested in teaching community engaged courses, and was facilitated by Prof. Marshal Ganz and Dr. Daphna Golan-Agnon, Director of the Students and Academy for Social Change forum.

In the beginning of November the Council for Higher Education in Israel published a call for cooperation, calling for the submission and reporting of programs comprising social involvement of students and higher education institutions in the community. The initiative was introduced by C.P.A. Shosh Berlinsky, Director General of the Council for Higher Education. The main goals of the call for cooperation: formulation and expansion of social involvement programs of students and higher education institutions in the community, with greater cooperation and involvement of faculty members and heads of institutions, and advancement of research in this area. The Steering Committee that formulated the call for cooperation at the Planning and Budgeting Committee proposes several options for integrating student social action, and emphasizes the importance of academic guidance of this activity. The call for cooperation defines a frame for budgeting the programs, as well as scholarships and research grants. One of the important requirements of the call for cooperation is that each academic institution submit a social report specifying the various activities of students and faculty members in the community, as well as a recommendation to make social commitment a criterion for promotion of faculty members.

Shoshy Bohadana, a social activist from Florentine neighborhood in Tel-Aviv, and Chairperson of the Board of Directors of “Mahapach”, an organization active for education, housing, and labor rights in seven communities across Israel, told her story of joining “Mahapach”. This story relates the evolvement of a partnership between Shoshy, the students, and other activists in the “Mahapach” community. Initially, Shoshy’s expectations of “Mahapach” were different from the interaction that eventually materialized, and so the relationship, which began through her children, became a space in which she can express opinions and ideas, and consult with others. With time, the relationship became a source of power and knowledge that developed through joint work with the students.

Dr. Daphna Golan-Agnon, Director of the Students and Academy for Social Change Forum, and faculty member at the Minerva Center for Human Rights in the Faculty of Law, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, introduced the forum’s objectives: encouraging research and public debate concerning the commitment of the academy to the community; helping to develop academic courses that integrate students' community action; creating settings for peer learning, exchange of knowledge and consultation; promoting research on the subject and assessing the contribution of courses and projects to students, the community, and higher education institutions.

The keynote lecture by Prof. Marshal Ganz outlined desired components and characteristics of student social involvement programs. Prof. Ganz, who came to Israel as a guest of SHATIL (Empowerment and Training Center for Social Change Organizations), participates in a project under the auspices of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching that includes twenty-one courses from different universities around the United States that integrate student action in the community. The goal of this group of faculty members is to encourage social and political commitment of students through their participation in the courses, and to engage in ongoing learning and evaluation. The model developed by Prof. Ganz originates in his life story, which has involved work in different unions and social organizations. This model differentiates between types of social action – activity that is individual and voluntary, as opposed to activity that is collective, conducted in cooperation with others, and that acknowledges that social action involves acquired, learned practices, and that interaction with others in the community is an essential element that has to be learned. Prof. Ganz argues that courses cannot lead to implementation of theory in the field – they can provide theoretical background, but more so need to provide tools with which to learn, analyze, and interpret the field experience, thus redesigning the students' practices during the course of their work. Prof. Ganz's outline of the courses also addresses issues of climate: creating an environment suitable for deep reflection, criticism, and debates that promote learning, as well as many other elements concerning motivation, resources, etc.

The discussion and practice of programs integrating social action of students in the United States began approximately 25 years ago, and so did the use of various terms – civic engagement, community based learning, and community service learning. The different terms imply different developments and directions. In Israel, the matter requires joint study and discussion in order to create a community that will be able to lead the activity and offer terms relevant to the Israeli reality.

The questions raised in the discussion following the lecture touched upon principle aspects: how is the connection between the field work and the academic knowledge created in the courses? How are courses made to be effective, influential? What is the role of this type of activity as opposed to the existing social systems, and does this kind of activity not lead necessarily to de-politicization? How are courses and activities integrated across different disciplines and faculties?   

In the second part of the study day a workshop was conducted with the participation of a smaller number of faculty members, students and staff members of social involvement units of several institutions. The workshop was facilitated by Prof. Marshal Ganz and Dr. Daphna Golan-Agnon. Discussion of some of the questions raised earlier carried on into the workshop. It was an opportunity to raise further questions and establish contacts between its participants, including possible cooperations at various levels. The discussion included, among other things, a conversation about terms or definitions. For example, use of the term community – how is a community defined today? How do students and residents of an area regain some sense of community or solidarity? Does the discipline through which activity is generated predetermine the community in which the activity will take place? 

Another issue discussed is the objectives of the courses. The theoretical frame proposed by Prof. Ganz includes the objective of a collective activity that links students, community and faculty members/academy. Other faculty members raised the need to conduct courses that combine practical work with more specific objectives that focus on the students, on their experience as a foundation for their engaging in social action in the future.

All these are only some of the many things discussed at this seminar. As Prof. Ganz described it, the important thing is the transformation from reflection to action. The upcoming meetings of the Students and Academy for Social Change Forum will include peer learning with the aim of guiding the move from discussion to development and design of courses, and their implementation at various institutions of higher education.

To view invitation, press here.

Student seminars

State-wide Student Seminar

State-wide Student Seminar, 7-8 December 2012, Nordiya Guesthouse


The Campus-Community Partnership and Mahapach-Taghir held the seventh annual student seminar at the Nordiya Guesthouse. The seminar brought student activists, and those interested in social change together in an atmosphere that fosters dialogue and collaboration directed at social and political change.

Click here to see photos from the event 


One hundred and fifty students and activists from academic institutions around the country participated in two days of workshops and activities focusing on knowledge and skills pertinent to social activism.


The seminar was preceded by months of preparation, which included regional meetings designed to bring student from different communities together to engage in dialogue, exchange knowledge and brainstorm. These meeting took place in several student communities, among them Sderot, Jerusalem, Mrar, Tamra, Kiryat Shmoneh, Tel Aviv and Tira.


In addition, meetings of the seminar’s steering committee were held throughout the country on a monthly basis. This committee, which consisted of students and representatives of various organizations, was responsible for planning the seminar, selecting materials from the many proposals for lectures and workshops that were submitted by students and organizations, and dealing with dilemmas that arose in the process.


The seminar commenced with a plenary lecture by Dr Daphna Golan, Director of the Campus-Community Partnership on the subject of “Learning from Doing – Education and Social Change”. The lecture was dynamic, with active participation of the students, introductions, and sharing of experiences and visions for the future. The second part of the lecture presented the three main explanations for inequality in education based on three waves of feminism. The first, based on liberal feminism focuses on structural and budgetary discrepancies in the education system in peripheral towns and Palestinian villages. These discrepancies ultimately result in disparities in learner achievements. The second is the based on the second wave of feminism which focuses on the role of women teachers and the ways of knowing and teaching. Analyzing the education system from the point of view of teachers and criticizing ways of teaching, the lecture presented alternatives to the ways which are considered successful. The third wave of feminism suggests questions of class and race and thus the ways children and youth relate to and connect to the material studied was discussed. The lecture analyzed various positions apropos the inequities and ways in which the education system can address them, emphasizing the students’ role in bringing about change.


Over the two days of the seminar, dozens of workshops were held on a variety of issues, including feminism, socio-economic rights, Palestinian history and the Nakba, militarism, education, gender, social justice, student activism, etc. Parallel sessions, at least one Arabic session in each time slot, enabled participants to choose between workshops. The program is attached in Hebrew and Arabics.


Apart from the students who lead and facilitated workshops, civil society organizations who contributed a workshop to the seminar included: The Association for Civil Rights in Israel, New Profile- Movement for the Civilization of Israeli Society, Women Against Violence, Public Committee Against Torture in Israel, Co-Councling, Maa'barah, Zochrot (Remembering), Havruta – Religious Gays. The New Student Union, Combatants for Peace, Aswat- Palestinian Gay Women, Amnesty International- Israel, Tarabut-Hithabrut: Arab- Jewish Movement for Social and Political Change, Shatil- An Initiative of the New Israel Fund Approximately half the workshops were given by participating students, who brought their knowledge and experience in social activism to the occasion.


The workshops provided these students with an important platform for practicing the conveying of materials, peer education and forming personal connections. The other half of the workshops were given by representatives of various social change organizations and academic faculty members. This combination of student, faculty and organizational lecturers constituted a unique opportunity for engaging in activist discourse and promoting collaboration.


On Friday evening, after a shared meal, the students enjoyed a variety of social activities, from a coffee shop where students could meet one another and discuss issues important to them to spontaneous activities initiated by students, such as playing music and dancing. The Evening as the whole seminar was planned to fit students who observe Shabbat as well as religious Muslims.


Towards the end of the seminar, the film Bodrus was screened. A documentary film about a Palestinian community organizer, Ayed Morrar, who unites local Fatah and Hamas members along with Israeli supporters in an unarmed movement to save his village of Budrus from destruction by Israel’s Separation Barrier. Success eludes them until his 15-year-old daughter, Iltezam, launches a women’s contingent that quickly moves to the front lines. Struggling side by side, father and daughter unleash an inspiring, yet little-known, movement in the Occupied Palestinian Territories that is still gaining ground today. In an action-filled documentary chronicling this movement from its infancy, Budrus shines a light on people who choose nonviolence to confront a threat. While this film is about one Palestinian village, it tells a much bigger story about what is possible in the Middle East. Ayed succeeded in doing what many people believe to be impossible: he united feuding Palestinian political groups, including Fatah and Hamas; he brought women to the heart of the struggle by encouraging his daughter Iltezam's leadership; and welcoming hundreds of Israelis to cross into Palestinian territory for the first time and join this nonviolent effort. The film contributed to a successful and positive conclusion to the seminar.


The seminar concluded with a summary and feedback plenary session moderated by Liron Azoulay, Co-director of Mahapach-Taghir and Najwan Khatib, coordinator at the Campus-Community partnership. Students’ responses were positive and many noted that the seminar had been inspiring. Other stated that the workshops were varied and interesting, and that Arabic had been suitably represented both in the workshops and printed materials distributed, and that the social atmosphere was good, etc.


The seminar was a one-of-a-kind activity that brought together many students and activists from organizations all over the country, providing them with a rare platform for activist dialogue in an open and secure environment. We hope, in the wake of this successful seminar, that we managed to create a space that facilitated thinking, dialogue and cooperation that will raise awareness and social involvement among students, and also trigger new ideas for connections and collaborative projects in the future.

Creating Reality - Statewide Seminar for Student Activists

Creating Reality - Statewide Seminar for Student Activists, Jerusalem, June 3, 2011
The annual statewide seminar for student activists, titled "Creating Reality", took place at Beit Breter, the Authority for Community and Youth, at the Givat Ram Campus of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Following five years of large seminars mostly for students who are new to civic activism, this year the seminar focused on the needs of more experienced student activists. Over 50 Arab and Jewish students, from institutions of higher education and civic engagement frameworks from across the country, participated in the seminar. Our main partner in the organization of the seminar, as in previous years, was Mahapah-Taghir, and the seminar was guided by a steering committee of student activists engaged in several frameworks, who are graduates of our previous seminars.
 
For the seminar invitation (in Hebrew and Arabic) press here.
 
The seminar's main objectives was to provide experienced student activists with a place for thorough examination of practical tools for social activism, as used by a range of organizations and social movements, alongside exposure to new campaigns and struggles, and to critical thought about relevant social problems.
 
After a plenary opening session, students were asked to choose between four main tracks: status-less persons, urban planning, education and society, and partnership and inclusion. Each of these tracks/themes incorporated two workshops or panels that presented both a theoretical perspective and practical tools for change, discussing current case studies, and evaluating the tools and strategies in light of their effectiveness. The second part of the day included a study tour, a documentary film, and two workshops – all related to successful social change efforts, investigating the strategies that contributed to the success of each struggle. A closing session was held for participants to share their conclusions and overview, and feedback questionnaires were filled.
For the seminar program (in Hebrew and Arabic) press here.
 
From the tour to Lifta
Students participating in this year's seminar were pleased about the opportunity to participate in a smaller, more intimate setting that enabled a more straight-forward, yet intricate dialogue, and a more direct acquaintance with fellow participants. Students mentioned the different sessions were an important introduction to the work of a range of organizations, and to the tools and strategies for change which may now enrich their activism. Yet students also asked to return to the two-day seminar format, which they felt is more inspiring and energizing, and better cultivates dialogue and the connections among participants and organizations.
 
The annual statewide student seminar is singular event – there is no comparative framework in Israel. It therefore remains a rare occasion for shaping and inspiring an activist student discourse, and for reinforcing the relations among students, academia, and organizations for social change.

Dorot Fellowship in Israel & Campus-Community Partnership

Dorot Fellowship in Israel & Campus-Community Partnership – Joint Program, Jerusalem, February-April, 2011
The Partnership has initiated a joint program with the Dorot Fellowship in Israel – a pilot program bringing together Israeli and American young activists to explore strategies and tools for social change and develop skills for effective leadership, through a cross-cultural experience.
Dorot Fellows and graduates of the Partnership's community-engaged courses participate in three workshops, over a period of three months, to discuss challenges for advancing social change, and reflect upon their experience in civic engagement. The workshops integrate guest lectures, study tours, and coaching sessions. Mixed teams of participants will work to formulate and implement a short term project in Jerusalem, addressing issues of multiculturalism.
The project aims to foster among participants a multifaceted view of Jerusalem and of Israeli society, and provide participants with tools and motivation for contending with the ongoing challenges they face as young leaders for change.

Seminar for Student Activists in the South

Seminar for Student Activists in the South, Be'er Sheva, June 16, 2010
This student seminar held at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev toward the end of the 2009/10 academic year was titled "Human rights, planning policy, and communities in the Negev." The seminar focused on issues such as urban planning and planning justice in the public space, and human rights and the environment in an area contested by Jews and Arabs.
 
The seminar was organized together with several social change organizations working in the Negev, including Shatil, ASSAF (Aid Organization for Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Israel), Sustainable Development for the Negev and ACRI (the Association for Civil Rights in Israel), and was attended by engaged students, faculty members, NGO representatives, and local officials from Be'er Sheva and Rahat.

Workshop for Environmental Student Activists in Jerusalem

Workshop for Environmental Student Activists in Jerusalem, Jerusalem, June 10, 2010
Students from the Partnership-supported course, "Environmental Justice in a Trans-boundary Space," organized a workshop which brought together students from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's departments of Geography, Environmental Studies, and the Faculty of Law, as well as representatives of nongovernmental organizations working in Jerusalem, including Bimkom – Planners for Planning rights, ACRI – the Association for Civil Rights in Israel, Ir Amim, and the Israeli Committee against House Demolitions.
The workshop involved a discussion of environmental issues in East Jerusalem. Students presented work they had done on the lack of public parks, inadequate waste disposal facilities, and water and sewage problems, while law students proposed ways to combat these problems in the legal system. Participants commented on the research projects presented, suggesting ways for building on these projects in ways that will bring about effective change.

Statewide Seminar for Student Activists

Statewide Seminar for Student Activists, Tel Hai, April 23-24, 2010
The Campus-Community Partnership's statewide seminar took place this year in Israel's far north, at Tel-Hai College. The seminar brought together students from diverse backgrounds, studying at institutions of higher education from across the country, for two days of intense workshops aimed at providing knowledge and tools for social activism.
 
The seminar was preceded by months of joint planning by several groups. The group leading the seminar was the Tapuach student group at Tel Hai College, which was formed during the Partnership's statewide student seminar in 2009. Together with Tapuach, other student organizations from campuses across the country joined the planning process, forming a truly statewide steering committee.
 
For the invitation in Hebrew and Arabic, press here.
For the detailed program in Hebrew, press here.
 
Over 300 students attended the seminar, where they could choose between dozens of workshops on such topics as Jewish-Arab relations, feminism, human rights, militarism, social change, education, gender, and more. In addition, students could attend two study tours, panels on pressing social issues, and a variety of documentary films. This year the seminar also featured a fair-trade market with locally made products from the Galilee, where students could learn more about fair-trade in Israel.
 
On Friday evening following a communal dinner, students enjoyed many social activities, beginning with small group discussions on personal issues, and performances by Kalkidan, an Ethiopian hip hop artist, and Arabiat, a Palestinian-Israeli duo from Acre.
 
Student responses to this year's seminar were enthusiastic, and many told us that it is a major inspirational event. In their feedback forms, many students expressed desire for a longer, three day seminar and for more meetings throughout the year for attendees to process what they had experienced. They noted that in these difficult times, the seminar provided a unique opportunity for optimism.
 
With the completion of yet another successful seminar, we hope that this tradition of an annual gathering will become a milestone in the students' journey of social engagement, constitute a space for thought, discussion, and impetus towards action. Currently, the seminar is a singular event, particularly in its scope, for student activists form different organizations from across the country. Therefore it presents a unique opportunity for creating an activist student discourse, and for encouraging the integration of the triangle – students, academia, and civil society. 

Tools for Change

Tools for Change – training seminar for engaged students, Jerusalem, February-May, 2010
The program Tools for Change was developed for a group of engaged students, to provide an acquaintance with strategies for social change, stressing the importance of practical tools. The need for the program came up four years ago during the Partnership's first seminars for student activists in Jerusalem, as students raised their interest in a framework that would enable them to acquire practical tools for their ongoing civic engagement. This is the program's third year of implementation.
 
The program was developed and implemented together with the Student Union at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Shatil – Leading Social Change in Israel. Workshops were held on a weekly basis, with the participation of 30 engaged students.
 
The following is a list of the workshops and facilitators:
 
1. Introduction to social activism and civil society in Israel – facilitated by Carlos Sztyglic, Associate Director, Shatil.
 
2. Strategy building, the first step in any social initiative or struggle – Dina Kashdan, organizational consultant at Shatil. In this workshop, students learned how to define goals and objectives, and how to articulate a strategy.
 
3. Resource development – how to raise funds in today's difficult economic climate – Samer Jaber, resource development consultant at Shatil.
 
4. Lobbying – importance and methodology – Shlomit Ashery, lobby consultant at Shatil. 
 
5. How to work with the media and leverage it to promote change – Ayelet Danon, media consultant, Center for Policy Change, Shatil.
 
6. Community organizing and work with volunteers – a central challenge for social organizations – Jabir Asaqla, Director of Palestinian Programs, Shatil. The workshop presented successful models employed by social change organizations, and modes of action and organization strategies.

Seminar for Student Activists in Jersualem

Seminar for Student Activists in Jersualem, Jerusalem, January 14-15, 2010
The Seminar for Student Activists in Jerusalem was organized in partnership with the Student Union of the Hebrew University and the Jerusalem Foundation, and held at the Jerusalem Cinematheque and other locations across the city. The seminar brought together student activists, or those interested in becoming activists, and various Jerusalem social change organizations.
The Jerusalem seminar provided a setting for learning about the social, economic and political situation in Jerusalem, and aimed to provide broader background to the specific social engagement of students in the city. Students participating in the seminar got to know another side of Jerusalem through learning about particular social problems. In this way, the seminar further exposed students who are currently not engaged to social issues, with the aim of provoking them to become engaged. The seminar also allowed students to become acquainted with various organizations working in the city. We hope that the inter-organizational relations formed as part of the seminar become a platform for cooperation on various levels.
This year's seminar attracted over 120 students from institutions of higher education across the city, including the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design, the Hadassah College, and the Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance. Many of them had not participated in similar activities previously, and in this sense the seminar was particularly successful.
The first day of the seminar opened with an improvisational theater workshop to break the ice and create a warm, accepting atmosphere. Following the workshop five panels were held concurrently, facilitated by students, faculty, or NGO representatives: Art and activism; gender and sexuality in Palestinian society, public transportation in Jerusalem, Religion in Jerusalem, refugees, and the environment. At night the film "Jerusalem: the east side story" was screened, followed by a discussion with the film's director, Muhammad ElAtar. The second day of the seminar included parallel tours, dealing with such issues as housing, art and social change, archeology, politics and society, and community gardens.
Student response to the seminar was positive and enthusiastic. Students noted that that the seminar was enriching, thought provoking, and exposed them to topics they would not otherwise have encountered.
For the invitation in Hebrew and Arabic, press here.

Statewide Seminar for Student Activists

Statewide Seminar for Student Activists, Pk'iin, April 5-6 2009
The Partnership for Social Change's statewide seminar took place this year in village of P'kiin in the Galilee. The seminar brought together student activists and students interested in activism for social change, in a space which encouraged shared discussion and action for change.
For a short film from the seminar,
press here.
The seminar was held in P'kiin, and directly addressed the 2007 clashes between residents and police instigated by the installation of a cellular antenna. Students met with local representatives who spoked of the village's history, the 2007 events, and their consequences.
The seminar was attended by approximately 200 students from twenty institutions of higher education across Israel. Students could choose between fifty six workshops and two tours that took place in eight time slots. In each timeslot, the offerings included 8-10 activities, with at least one taking place in Arabic.
The workshops addressed a range of issues, including society, education, environment, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, professional workshops on tools for social change, experiential workshops, films about social issues and more. The first tour focused on the village of P'kiin while the second tour went to the village of Suhmata that was demolished in 1948. A special emphasis was given to the war in Gaza, and workshops related to the war were held throughout the seminar. In addition, workshops were held about Druze society, life in the nort of Israel, and inter-faith relations in P'kiin, in order to encourage the study of social issues in the periphery and strengthen the connection to the place where the seminar was being held.
In the evening, students participated in social activities that they organized throughout the seminar, and could choose between an improvisatory theater performance, a Jewish-Arab children's circus from the Galilee, or a play by a student from the Horfesh theater. During the second day an open market was held where students could exchange items without cost.
 
Among the speakers at the seminar were students, representatives of social change organizations, and university faculty. The workhops provided a forum for joint study, brainstorming, and formation of personal connections to social issues.
The seminar advances the Partnership for Social Change's goal to create a bridges between the three elements that form the core of the organization: the academy, the students, and the community. In addition, the seminar provides a unique space for Jewish-Arab partnership. The seminar included Palestinian organizations and granted a central and respectable place to the Arabic language, both in the advertisements issued prior to the seminar, the written material that was distributed during the seminar, and the workshops themselves.
 
"I leave with a lot of hope. It was important for me to meet people beyond the workshops. The small encounters…excited me and allowed me to check facts. I really enjoyed the improvisational theater, as well as the workshops that dealt with equality and the conflict."
 
At the end of the seminar, as a lesson from previous seminars, we held qualitative feedback sessions. The students separated into groups based on their areas of residence and home universities in order to summarize the seminar and to suggest topics for future discussion and activity based on their own interests.
An announcement board was set up at the entrance lobby to allow students to advertise their own projects, learn about various activities in which other students were involved, and find partners for future action.
In addition, many students noted the special atmosphere in the seminar, and the opportunity to meet students "like them," as well as the opportunity to create a network of student activists. Many spoke of the event as a place that allowed them to renew and refresh their energies for social activism. Following are some quotes from students who participated:
 
"This is an amazing collection of activists: people who want to produce something, partnership, power. I will carry the workshops from the seminar with me for a long time."
 
"The meeting between different people and different cultures enlightened me, and I hope that this meeting will engender future cooperation. Maybe next year I can convince some more friends to come. It was an unusual and refreshing experience."
 
At the end of the seminar, students received a list of phone numbers and email addresses of the participants. The meeting enabled the creation of a social network of social activists who update each other on a variety of topics and activities. Students in Jerusalem established a critical study group about social issues. Students at Tel-Hai College created an activist student organization, and a variety of intiatives were able to attract new partners. A short film was made of the seminar, which was published on the Israeli news website Walla.

Student Activism in Jerusalem

Student Activism in Jerusalem, March 19-20, 2009
The Seminar for Student Activists in Jerusalem was organized in partnership with the Student Union of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, as well as many other organizations who were involved in all stages of the seminar – participating in its steering committee, facilitating workshops, conducting tours, publicizing the event, and more. It was initially scheduled to be held earlier during the academic year, but the steering committee decided to postpone due to the war in Gaza. Many students were directly affected by the conflict, and felt that they could not conduct the seminar in the midst of the war. When the seminar was finally held in March, special attention was paid to the war in Gaza, providing students with a much-needed space to voice their emotions and concerns.
The Jerusalem seminar provided a setting for learning about the social, economic and political situation in Jerusalem, and aimed to provide broader background to the specific social engagement of student activists in the city. Students participating in the seminar got to know another side of Jerusalem through learning about particular social problems. In this way, the seminar further exposed students who are currently not engaged in community action to social issues, with the aim of provoking them to become engaged. The seminar also allowed students to become acquainted with organizations working in the city. We believe that the inter-organizational relations formed as part of the seminar will become a platform for fruitful cooperation.
 
For a detailed seminar program in Hebrew and Arabic press here.

 

Dozens of students from a range of institutions of higher education, a range of disciplines, organizations and programs, participated in the seminar. Many of them had not participated in similar activities previously, and in this sense the seminar was particularly successful. Student feedback was positive and wholehearted. They noted the seminar was thought provoking, and exposed them to questions and issues that they would not have encountered through other frameworks. They expressed interest in similar activities in the future. Students were particularly impressed with the range of organizations involved in the seminar, the workshops and the tours, and in particular a workshop held about the obstacles to exercising rights in East Jerusalem, which attracted many participants.
The first day of the seminar opened with greetings from Partnership coordinator Najwan Khateeb and student union representative Noam Wiesner, followed by a plenary panel with Prof. Shlomo Hasson of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Geography Department and Rami Nasrallah of the International Center for Peace and Cooperation in Jerusalem. The two spoke of "Jerusalem as an Open City – Past, Present, and Future," raising the question of what Jerusalem might look like in the future, and sharing a joint vision for the city. Following the session, participants separated into six concurrent workshops facilitated by students and representatives of social change organizations including the Jerusalem student organizations "New Spirit" and "Meluna," and social change organizations "BeMaagalei Zedek," the "Atta (giving) Center" which provides services to residents of East Jerusalem, and "Singur Kehilati (Community Advocacy)". Workshops discussed housing issues in Jerusalem, art and social change, education in East Jerusalem, obstacles to human rights in East Jerusalem, community advocacy for social change, poverty and employment, and more. The workshops were followed by a night city tour focusing on youth at risk, organized by the Legal Clinical Education Center at the Hebrew University's Faculty of Law, inspired by David Grossman's book, Someone to Run With, as well as a screening of the film project "Gaza/Sderot – Life in Spite of Everything," which documented everyday life in Gaza and Sderot prior to the outbreak of the war.
The seminar continued the following morning with five concurrent study-tours: urban ecology in Jerusalem, access of physically disabled to businesses and institutions in the city, East Jerusalem and the Separation Wall, the right to adequate housing in East Jerusalem, and an acquaintance with the ultra-orthodox (“Haredi”) neighborhoods and the Haredi community model.

Statewide Seminar for Student Activists

Statewide Seminar for Student Activists, Dimona, May 30-31 2008
“The seminar was amazing, successful and very challenging for the future. I believe that after this seminar we will go on to real action as an engaged group.” (Abir, Oranim College and Mahapach-Taghir).
 
“I want to say that the seminar was a very significant experience for me, a stepping stone in my intellectual and social development.” (Hila, Social Theatre Program, University of Haifa).
 
The Partnership for Social Change and Mahapach-Taghir's annual statewide seminar was held in May 30-31, 2008. This was the third statewide seminar, which is the Partnership's central student seminar, and aimed to bring together students engaged for social change through different organizations and programs across the country, in order to enrich their political and social knowledge, contribute to their social engagement, encourage a shared discourse, and promote co-operations among organizations. As part of the seminar's social and political agenda, it was decided to hold the seminar in Dimona, a peripheral, development town in the Negev.
For a short film from the seminarpress here.
For a short presentation about the seminarpress here.
 
Preparation stages
The seminar was preceded by a preparation process that lasted approximately six months. This process included the formation of a steering committee, which was composed of students and representatives of social change organizations. Members of the steering committee shaped the framework of the seminar, chose the topics and issues to be discussed out of the numerous workshops proposed by students and organizations, took decisions when faced with dilemmas that arouse throughout the preparation stages, and took upon themselves central roles during the seminar. Members of the steering committee were continually in contact with (larger) student groups from the organizations they represented, in different areas, and consulted the students before making decisions in the steering committee.
 
Participants
The number of participants in the seminar this year was greater than in the previous years – 190 students, from 26 universities and colleges across the country, and active in some 90 organizations and programs for social change, participated in the seminar.
List of organizations: Green Course, Mahapach-Taghir, Rape Crisis Centers, SHATIL, Peers Learning, Social Involvement Unit at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Bat Shalom, Meretz, Israeli Center for Social Justice, Community Advocacy, the Social Economic College, Hevra Tova, Student Council, HU-NGO Connection, Tools for Change Program – series of encounters on social activism, Latet – Israeli Humanitarian Aid, Amcha, Legal Clinics at the Hebrew University, Ta'ayush, JDC – Israel, the Program of Education for Social Justice, Environmental Change and Peace Education – Kibbutzim College of Education, the Hothouse for Educational Entrepreneurship -  Kibbutzim College of Education, Alon, Perach (National Tutorial Project), Ossim Shalom, Neve Ya'acov Youth Community, Forum for the Study of a Different Economy, New Horizon, Israel Women's Network, Student Union at the Hebrew University, Student Union at Ben-Gurion University, Student Union at the Technion, organization for refugees from Darfur, Human Rights, Community and Planning Policy course at Ben-Gurion University, Ahava Youth Boarding School, Social Theatre Program at University of Haifa, Enosh – Israeli Mental Health Association, the Initiating Committee of Arab Students at Ben-Gurion University, Student Union at University of Haifa, Baladna – Association for Arab Youth, Mossawa center, Adalah – Legal Center for Arab Minority Rights in Israel, AJEEC – Arab-Jewish Center for Equality, Empowerment and Cooperation, Musrara Youth Community, Community Learning Center, Family Program, New Spirit, New Profile, Ayalim Association, Shema – Association for Education and Rehabilitation of Hearing Impaired Children and Youth, Stand With Us, Brera Center, Anonymous for Animal Rights, Green Course, Greenpeace, Education with a View Towards the Community program – Tel-Hai College, ALUT – Israeli Society for Autistic Children, Green Action, Tafnit, Issawiya Community Center, Solidarity – Social Left on Campus, Student Coalition at Tel-Aviv University, Wellspring for Democratic Education, Minerva Human Rights Fellows, Lafer Center for Women and Gender Studies, Aswat, Tzeva – Youth Building Future, Kol Kore, Kvutzot HaBhira, Al-Inayah al-Ahaliya, ELI – Israeli Association for Child Protection, Gilo Center for Citizenship, Democracy and Civic Education, Hamoked – Center for the Defense of the Individual, Yesh Gvul, Art and Activism course – Bezalel, Amitim in the Community, the Movement for Global Awakening, SCHUG – Environment, Society and Us, Salon Mazal, Alternative Youth Summer Camp, Kav La'Oved, Women's Coalition for Peace, Commitment to Peace and Social Justice, Heschel Center, Community Translating course – Bar-Ilan University, Tz'ar Ba'aley Haim, Isha L'Isha – Haifa Feminist Center, Alliance, the Open House, Nadav – Youth Leadership.
 
Framework and contents
The seminar commenced on Friday morning with short words of introduction and greeting by Dr. Daphna Golan, Director of the Academy-Community Partnership for Social Change, and Khuloud Aderis, Co-Director of Mahapach-Taghir. The opening words were followed by a review of the seminar program and framework. Following the opening, students dispersed to the numerous workshops which took place through Saturday afternoon. In total, 56 workshops and 2 study tours were held throughout 7 time units. During every time unit students could choose between 8 to 10 activities. Workshops addressed a variety of issues, including: education, Israeli society, tools for social change, environment, philosophy of social change, gender, and social-economic issues. In addition, two study-tours took place. The first study tour was to the unrecognized villages in the Negev, guided by the Forum for Co-Existence in the Negev, and the second study tour was of Bir al-Saba, guided by Zochrot. A special emphasis was placed upon workshops that addressed social issues relevant to the South – wishing to encourage the study of issues related to the seminar's geographical location, while addressing social issues relevant to the periphery.
            About half of the workshops throughout the seminar were facilitated by students, brining to the workshops the experience which they have accumulated throughout their social engagement. These workshops afford to the students an important setting in which they may gain experience in instruction and facilitation of peer learning, and a setting to expand personal ties. The other half of the workshops was facilitated by representatives of social change organizations, and by faculty members of academic institutions. This unique integration of facilitation by students, faculty members and representatives of organizations, contributed to advancing the Partnership's agenda of mutual commitment between institutions of higher education, students and the community. As in each and every year, the Jewish-Palestinian partnership was evident, represented by the issues addressed in the workshops, increased participation of Palestinian organizations in the seminar, and the equal and respected status dedicated to the Arabic language (in all written material of the seminar, and in the implementation of workshops in Arabic).
            In the social evening, students enjoyed several social activities, including movement, music and dancing. Throughout the seminar, a calm and pleasant atmosphere prevailed. Students expressed their enthusiasm regarding the activities and workshops. Discussions continued into the breaks, and there was a general feeling of success in all aspects. 
For the complete seminar programpress here.
 
Summary of the seminar
At the end of the seminar students were invited to propose concluding sessions – to think together of continuation activities, according to their areas of interest.
            One group contended with the establishment of a new student group at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem – a group of Bat Shalom (women's peace organization). Students from the Hebrew University were invited to participate and discuss possible activities on campus in the coming year.
            A second group, intended for students interesting in environmental action, discussed issues related to environmental activities in Israel, difficulties in advancing action, and possible solutions. The main issue raised at the meeting was the advancement of environmental issues in the Palestinian society in Israel. It was decided to focus upon the area of transportation, and act jointly to advance public transportation in Arab towns in Israel. The issue was suggested in parallel to the advancement of an environmental agenda – as it addresses an acute need in the Palestinian society, and combines an example of characteristic discrimination between Arabs and Jews in Israel. In this way it is possible to link environmental issues with inequality issues, and connect the Palestinian society to environmental questions and a genuine need in the community.
            The third group introduced a preliminary idea regarding an internet project which would enable to create social networks of activists for social change. The student who initiated the idea presented the project, the vision and possible ways of implementation. This was followed by a joint thinking process regarding the idea, and contacts were formed with the aim of promoting its realization.
            In the fourth group students worked to formulate a press release about the seminar. Their goal was to write a statement, a call from the participants of the seminar, to all students to act for social change. After formulating the message, the students prepared a large sheet on which they wrote in Hebrew and in Arabic – "Students call for social change". Participants in the seminar were invited to write upon the sign social messages, sign their name, and add a stamping of their hands. Participants were photographed with the sign, and this photograph was sent together with the press release statement to the local and national media. This action lead to the publication of the seminar in two websites:

Yoram (education website) – 
press here.
Volunteering in Israel – 
press here

            The fifth concluding session group discussed the issue of cooperation among organizations. At the beginning the discussion focused upon barriers regarding cooperation among organizations, and how it might be possible to overcome them in order to allow broader social change and the creation of coalitions. Further, ideas of how it might be possible to encourage cooperation were raised. Concrete ties were formed between students who are active in several frameworks.
            Finally, the sixth group was composed of students and residents active in Mahapach-Taghir. The group held an intra-organizational discussion about what could be taken from the contents and messages of the seminar and applied in the organization, stressing the enrichment of residents of the different communities, and encouragement of community and student activism.
 
Evaluation
At the end of the seminar, participants filled feedback forms which included several criteria for the evaluation of the seminar. The evaluation results were excellent, and constitute an additional testimony of the seminar's success. Students wrote that the diversity of workshops in the seminar was very good, that workshops were very interesting, and that facilitation was great. The organizational aspects of the seminar were also awarded high marks. Most importantly, students considered the seminar as an event that would greatly contribute to their social engagement in the future. 
There are no better and more important comments than those of students about the seminar, taken from the anonymous feedback forms:
 
“Lately I have been preoccupied with myself, and less engaged in social actions such as this seminar – the seminar aroused in me motivation, especially as I am towards completing my degree, and gave me energy and thought to make change through work, and continue with the idea of the seminar”.
 
“The seminar definitely gave me a push and stimulated me to think about the issue of social co-operations.”
 
“I have been exposed to new activities and am happy to get back to action.”
 
“I personally enjoyed the seminar and acquired many things –in most of the workshops in which I participated I saw serious students, who invested in the preparation of their lectures.”
 
“I was greatly contributed by this seminar, it contributed to my empowerment both in relation to work, and personally, made me think about my future in social action.”
 
“It was amazing, charming, I did not expect it to be so fun and interesting. Thank you.”
 
With the completion of this successful seminar, we hope that this tradition of an annual gathering will become a milestone in the students' journey of social engagement, constitute a space for thought, discussion, and impetus towards action. Currently, the seminar is a singular event, particularly in its scope, for student activists form different organizations from across the country. Therefore it presents a unique opportunity for creating an activist student discourse, and for encouraging the integration of the triangle – students, academy, and organizations for social change.

Seminar for Student Activists in Jerusalem

Seminar for Student Activists in Jerusalem, Jerusalem, December 27-28, 2007
The Seminar for Student Activists in Jerusalem was an initiative of the Academy-Community Partnership for Social Change, the Hebrew University Student Union, and partner organizations.
 
The seminar constituted a setting for learning about the social, economic and political situation in Jerusalem. It aimed to provide broader background to the specific social engagement of students in the city. This was done through acquaintance with Jerusalem, and with specific social problems in Jerusalem. In this way the seminar exposed students who are currently not engaged to specific social issues, with the aim of provoking them to become engaged. It allowed students to become acquainted with various organizations working in the city. We hope that the inter-organizational relations formed as part of the seminar become a platform for cooperation on various levels.
 
Over 100 students, from a range of disciplines, organizations and programs, participated in the seminar, which was successfully concluded. Most of them had not participated in similar activities previously, and in this sense the seminar was particularly successful – it exposed its audience to new information about social issues in the city.  
 
Student feedback concerning the seminar was positive and enthusiastic. They noted the seminar was enriching, thought provoking, and exposed them to questions and issues that they would not have encountered through other frameworks.
 
The seminar consisted of concurrent study-tours and workshop sessions, a lecture by Dr. Efraim Davidi, Academic Director of the Social Economic Academy, on the importance of student action for social change, and a concluding session which integrated presentations by representatives of several organizations – introducing the organizations' work and possibilities for student engagement.
 
 
 
Seminar program
 
Thursday – December 27th
 

16:00-16:30
Gathering and registration
16:30-17:00
Opening – Noam Wizner and Najwan Khateeb
17:00-18:30
Environmental Justice in Jerusalem
Avi Dabush, Environment and Community Project Coordinator, SHATIL
Art as an Agent of Social ChangeArtists for Social Change – Musrara
Volunteer-work in Jerusalem – Means or Objective?Brera Center
  The Education System in Jerusalem
Edna Darnell, Director, Educational Welfare in West Jerusalem and Abed Al-Karim La'afi, representative of the Parents' Committee in East Jerusalem
Poverty in Jerusalem and the Wisconsin Plan Lubna Masarwa, Community Action Center, and Tammy Gross, Community Advocacy, and participants in the program
The Question of the Gay Pride Parade in Jerusalem
Carmit Ben Meir, with the participation of an opponent and an advocate of the parade
18:30-19:00
Break
19:00-20:30
Lecture: the Importance of Student Engagement for Social Change – Efraim Davidi, Academic Director, the Social Economic Academy
20:30-23:00
Workshop and Night Tour – Youth in Jerusalem introduction to the issue of youth at risk, following David Grossman's book, Someone to Run With, and an encounter with youth at Zion Square – guided by the Law Clinics and ELEM.

 
 
 
Friday – December 28th, Musrara School for Photography, Media and New Music (Shivtei Israel 22)
 
Concurrent study tours around town were held, followed by concluding sessions in four working groups. Each group discussed the work of organizations active in a specific field, how students may become involved in their efforts, and included presentation of projects and a possible continuation program.
 

9:00-12:00
Study-tour 1: The ecology of JerusalemGavri Asoulin, Green Course
Study-tour 2: Access for the Physically Disabled in the City-Center
Brera Center, House of Wheels, and the Center for Independent Life
Study-tour 3: East Jerusalem and the Separation WallGilad Meishar, and Maya Kantor, Bat Shalom
Study-tour 4: From the Black Panthers to the Social Gallerythe Social Gallery, Musrara School
Study-tour 5: Tour of the Haredi Neighborhoods and acquaintance with the Haredi model of community
12:00-12:30
Refreshments and gathering of all tours at Musrara – Social Gallery
 
Summary – Environment
facilitated by Lior Gelbard, Green Course
Summary – Education facilitated by Guy Aloni, Mahapach-Taghir
Summary – Poverty, workers, and social and economic rights
facilitated by Salwa Alenat, Kav La'Oved
Summary - the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict in Jerusalem
facilitated by Adi Livni and Maya Kantor, Bat Shalom

 
 
Students completed feedback and evaluation in which they expressed interest in similar activities in the future. The partner organizations will continue to update the students and interest them in further activities. In light of the great demand, the Student Union will hold an additional study tour to East Jerusalem. The partner organizations are interested in initiating a continuation training program that will include training meetings for student activists – to provide practical tools for social change.
For further details please contact Moran: 02-5881389, moranr@savion.huji.ac.il
 
Organizations that took part in the seminar:
Legal Clinical Education Center at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mahapach-Taghir, Student Union of the Hebrew University, Brera Center, the Social Gallery – Musrara, the Social Involvement Unit of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Bat Shalom, Green Course, Bema'aglei Tzedek, Beit HaGalgalim (House of Wheels), the Center for Independent Life, Artists for Social Change – Musrara, Kav La'Oved (Worker's Line), SHATIL, Student's Coalition, Community Advocacy, the Other 10%, the Open House, Community Action Center, Association of Civil Rights in Israel, Halom – Halacha ve'Ma'ase, the Social Economic Academy, ELEM (Youth in Distress in Israel), Commitment for Peace and Social Justice.


 To view pictures from the seminarpress here.

Statewide Seminar for Student Activists

Statewide Seminar for Student Activists, Nazareth, April 11-12, 2007
The statewide seminar for student activists was a joint initiative of the Academy-Community Partnership for Social Change and Mahapach-Taghir. Its goals were to bring together student activists from across the country, and provide them a meaningful setting for study of social issues and for the creation of associations and joint actions.
 
 
Participants
Over 150 students participated in the seminar, students from 25 universities and colleges, active in 45 social change organizations and projects.
List of organizations and programs: Ibn Al-Nakab – Committee of Arab Students in the Negev, Everett Social Justice Fellows Program, Achoti, Itach-Ma'aki, Al Rabata, Amnesty, Baladna – Association for Arab Youth, Sawa, Bat Shalom, Community Advocacy, Rape Crisis Centers, New Profile, Community Art Course in Bezalel Academy for Art and Design, Street Law – Legal Clinic for Representation of Youth at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem Open House, the Association for Educational Institutions, the Center for Educational Entrepreneurship, "Halom" Student Group, Negev Institute for Leadership, Ma'an – Workers Advice Center, SHATIL, the Social Economic Academy, the Jewish-Arab Center, Alternative Information Center, Association for Civil Rights in Israel, Salon Mazal, Daila, Committee Against House Demolitions, Social Justice and Education for Peace Program – Kibbutzim College of Education, Arab Movement for Renewal, Awakening Movement, Yedid, Horesh, Hebrew University Student Exchange Program, Windows – Channel for Communication, Green Course, Greenpeace, Rabbis for Human Rights, Mossawa Center, Machsom Watch, Hebrew University Social Involvement Unit, Ossim Shalom, Alternative Youth Summer Camp, Kama Community, Coalition of Women for Peace, Kol Kore – Student for Social Action and Engagement, Human Rights in Israeli Society course at the Hebrew University, Issawiya Community Center, Community Theatre Program at the School of Visual Theatre, Gender and Human Rights course at the Hebrew University.
 
Seminar program:
The opening plenary session included an opening address by Nidaa Khaliliya Khatib, statewide coordinator of Mahapach-Taghir, Dr. Daphna Golan-Agnon, Director of the Academy-Community Partnership for Social Change, and Khuloud Aderis and Tami Schneider, co-directors of Mahapach-Taghir, who introduced the organizations' work and objectives. Their opening words in both Hebrew and Arabic constituted an accommodating, egalitarian opening, contributing to the seminar's objectives.
 
The seminar consisted of 37 workshops, held throughout the different time units. During each time unit 6 parallel sessions were held, and students were able to choose in which workshop they wish to participate. Further to the workshops, study tours were held to two Palestinian villages uprooted in 1948, and movie space was organized for viewing and discussion of documentaries. The workshops discussed issues such as: education, media, environment and ecology, Israeli society, economy, and feminism. About half of the workshops were facilitated by students, while the other half was facilitated by representatives of social change organizations and faculty members. Jewish and Palestinian partnership was emphasized in the seminar, expressed in the issues discussed in the workshops, and in the participation of Palestinian civil society organizations.

 
 
 
Wednesday, April 11th:
 
9:00-10:00 – gathering and refreshments
10:00
plenary opening - seminar objectives, outline and acquaintance
Workshops:
Israeli society
Education and pedagogy
Experiential
Ecology and environment
Social thought
Sessions in Arabic
Additional Topics
Study tours
Movie space
12:00-13:30
What is the Nakba? (Amaya Galili, Zochrot)
Home Schooling (Sharon Prelin, Mahapach)
Political Art (Meged Gozani, Mahapach)
Global warming and its impact upon disadvantaged populations (Lithy Ghanaim)
Anarchism (Alex Prushin, Minerva Human Rights Fellows and New Profile)
Social and economic rights (Amin Fares, economist, Mossawa Center)
National-civic service – panel (Baladna)
 
The Take – documentary about organizing in an Argentinean factory
13:30-15:00 – lunch break
15:00-16:30
Women mobility (Tagreed Alahmad, Kayan)
Position of Palestinian students in Israeli academic institutions (Fadi)
Personal safety (Coalition of Women for Peace)
Urban planning (Link)
Personal happiness in a capitalist world (Eyal Friedman)
Participation in planning processes (Adv. Rajiya Abu Akel, Mossawa Center)
Marriage (Carmit, Mahapach)
Tour to Safouriya with Zochrot
Discussion of the Take (Shay Dashevski, Mahapach and Socialist Struggle)
17:00-18:30
Future vision of the Palestinian Arabs in Israel – panel: Dr. Yousef Jabareen, Dr. Daphna Golan, Jaber Asaqla
Learning disabilities (Hila Harnoy, Mahapach)
Art and society: establishing of Barbur – community gallery in Jerusalem (representatives of Barbur gallery)
 
 
Gender (Linda Khawaled, Women Against Violence)
Unrecognized Bedouin villages (Hind Alesana, Committee of Arab Students in the Negev)
 
Yizkor – documentary film dealing with Jewish collective memory, nationality and education.
18:30-19:30 – dinner break
19:30-21:00
Rights in the criminal justice process (Erez Bar-Zvi, Legal Clinic for the Representation of Youth)
Democratic education as a tool for social change (Aric Bar-Ness, Kibbutzim College of Education)
Win-Win instead of Win-Lose (Ahmad Khaliliya)
Paths to a social-environmental struggle (Ofer Arnon, Green Course)
Organizations for social change – the privatization of protest?
(Nomi Drachinsky and Doron Hammermann-Schuldiner, Mahapach-Taghir)
Identity (Najwan Berekdar, Baladna)
 
 
Discussion of Yizkor (Tom Ba'bur, Mahapach)
21:00 – Musical evening
 
 
 
Thursday, April 12th:
 
8:30-10:00 – breakfast
Workshops:
Israeli society
Education and pedagogy
Media
Ecology and environment
Social thought
Sessions in Arabic
Additional Topics
Study tours
Movie space
10:00-11:30
Privatization (Sharaf Hassan, Association for Civil Rights in Israel)
Vision and work ways in work with youth (Fadi Shbeita, Reut-Sadaka)
Women in the media (Ornat Turin, Gordon College of Education)
Economy of solidarity (Yishai Menuhin)
Being a lesbian in a political space (Shani Werner and Inna Michaeli, Coalition of Women for Peace)
 
Refugees in Israel (Yonatan Ozeri)
Tour to Ma'alul with Committee of Uprooted Villages
The Lion Roared Twice – documentary discussing Tel-Hai myth and the Second Lebanon War
12:00-13:30
Israeli society – residents' rights (Kariman Abu Taha, Yedid)
Higher education and capitalism (Efraim Davidi, the Social Economic Academy)
Multi-culturalism in Israeli cinema (Udi Leon)
Is the national struggle connected to the struggle for social justice? (Fadi Shbeita, Reut-Sadaka)
The sacred obligation not to take part (Yishai Menuhin)
Student involvement in media campaigns
(Jafar Farah, Mossawa Center)
Racism and seeing the other (Rose Amar and Janna Magar, Commitment to Peace and Social Justice)
Discussion of The Lion Roared Twice (Hadas Yelnik, Mahapach)
13:30-15:00 – lunch break
15:30-17:00
What do we do? How do we continue after the seminar? Regional discussion groups
Jerusalem group.
Tel-Aviv and center group.
Northern group.
Southern group.
17:30-19:00
Presentations in the plenary and conclusions.
19:00 – departure
 
In the concluding sessions of the seminar students met in small groups according to location, and thought together about joint action.
 
Students studying in the southern part of the country, considered the need for enhancing awareness among students and residents to the situation of different populations – excluded populations living in poverty, and whose rights are often violated. Students expressed their desire to encourage "collective action for existence" as opposed to "co-existence".
 
Students from the north emphasized activities related to memory. They suggested holding an alternative memorial day, and organizing a tour to an uprooted village. Further, students spoke of establishing a dynamic group that will choose to work upon different issues, study them, and organize a specific activity. Some issues raised for possible action were tours to the Separation Barrier, acquaintance through life ceremonies, and joining of the campaign against hazardous quarries active next to Palestinian villages in the north.
 
Students from the center of the country spoke of action relating to the meaning of language, and its importance in bridging processes, and in forming relations among individuals and groups. Further, students spoke about the need to examine what motivates persons to act, and thinking about where each person undergoes processes of oppression, and where he or she oppresses others. Additional ideas were to create an alternative learning center and street stalls that will provide information about social injustice and workshops and encounters open to the public.
 
Students from Jerusalem spoke about three main areas of action that they wish to follow. One group discussed Jerusalem day – holding an alternative Jerusalem day and connecting this to other events related to 40 years occupation. The group suggested establishing a learning group about the Nakba, in which students would be trained to guide study tours in Jerusalem. Another group discussed the issue of house demolitions. Students suggested holding activities in the Knesset, and joining other student groups at the university that would want to address this issue. A third group discussed their desire to establish an internet forum for active students to distribute information about events and possible cooperation.
 
In the closing plenary session students presented the ideas raised in the regional groups and future ways for action.
Students completed evaluations that expressed satisfaction and interest in the diverse workshops and issues discussed at the seminar, and in the facilitation and organization of the seminar. Participants noted that the seminar will influence their social action, and asked that the seminars in the future provide more tools for forming a basis for joint action among organizations.
 
One of the students added, "The great enthusiasm among the students was what caught my attention. I felt all the energies, eagerness, and strong desire in each and every student to take an active part in the seminar, both in the planning of the units, the content of the workshops, coordination of the transportation, etc. So many students coming from so many places with so much motivation and one goal: change!"
 
We hope that the seminar will be one of a series of meetings, associations and activities that will continue in the future. It is our goal that the seminar will serve as a source of growth of additional frameworks for joint learning and action. We wish to make the seminar an annual event that will provide a setting for student activist discourse and the formation of political connections among diverse social issues.

The Right to Education in Jerusalem

The Right to Education in Jerusalem, Jerusalem, December 7-8, 2006
The seminar is an initiative of the Academy-Community Partnership for Social Change in partnership with: Wellspring for Democratic Education, BaKehila ("in the community") and Mahapach-Taghir. Approximately 80 students participated in the seminar, all of whom are involved in educational work in different frameworks across Jerusalem, and most of whom receive Perach (national tutorial project) scholarships.
The seminar's objectives were to expose engaged students in Jerusalem to important information and questions concerning education in the city, facilitate an encounter and dialogue for mutual learning of students working with youth in the framework of different educational organizations, and create connections between different organizations in Jerusalem.
 
Thursday, December 7:
15:30 - Gathering and refreshments.
16:00-17:30 - Panel: Education in Jerusalem
- Chair: Dr. Daphna Golan, Director of Academy-Community Partnership for Social Change
- Mrs. Sohaila Abu Gosh, Vice Director in Charge of East Jerusalem, Manchi (Educational Administration of Jerusalem)
-  Mr. Moshe Shriki, Principal, Kedma Junior High and High School
- Mr. Abed Al-Karim La'afi, Chair, Parents Committee
17:30-18:15 - Dinner
18:15-19:00 - Mr. Reuven Aberjil, the Black Panthers in Israel as a Chronicle of Struggle
19:00-21:30 - Critical Pedagogy (work in small groups)
 
Friday, December 8:
8:00-12:00 - Study tour of the separation barrier in Jerusalem, from Gilo to Kalandiya, guided by Adva Rodogovsky from Ir Amim.
12:00-13:30 - Summary and discussion in small groups
 
Panel: The Right to Education in Jerusalem
Summary of presentations of speakers:
  1. Mrs. Sohaila Abu Gosh, Vice Director in Charge of East Jersualem, Manchi: The municipality is responsible for the area from Qufur Aqab in the north to Um Tuba in the south, including approximately 40,000 students, 124 kindergartens, and 53 schools in East Jerusalem. The population of East Jerusalem cannot be regarded as homogenous: it includes urban and rural population, refugees, residents who live in extreme poverty, as well as under conditions of particular hardship in the Jerusalem Envelope. The education system is functioning under harsh physical conditions. Throughout the years there has been a great need in construction of new classrooms, and schools are forced to rent buildings, the rooms are extremely crowded, some of which are bedrooms or living rooms of rented houses transformed into classrooms. It is not possible to absorb all new students into the system, which is why it is mandatory only to register children who are in kindergarten age or first grade, and only those that register based upon a vacant spot. In certain neighborhoods, the study day is divided into two shifts: morning shift until 12:30, and afternoon shift, during which a new group begins to study. Boys and girls study in separate classes and schools in East Jerusalem - only in Beit Zafafa, Um Tuba and Silwan the schools are co-ed.
  2. Mr. Moshe Shriki, Principal, Kedma Junior High and High School: Integrating both a lecture and discussion with the audience, Moshe Shriki spoke of social stratification in Israel, focusing on the tracking process in the education system, and the lack of academically oriented high schools in disadvantaged neighborhoods across Israel (as opposed to vocational high schools that exist in these neighborhoods and towns). Kedma is the only academically oriented school that exists in a weakened neighborhood, and has been established to enable students from Katamonim neighborhood to achieve higher education. Classes in Kedma comprise of up to 25 students, and many times are divided into smaller groups of about 12 students. The students study about and work with the surrounding community as part of the school's curriculum.
  3. Mr. Abed Al-Karim La'afi, Chair of Parents' Committee in East Jerusalem: Abed Al-Karim La'afi spoke of the neglect of Jerusalem's education system since 1967, and noted that lately Education Minister Yuli Tamir acknowledged the need for 1,300 additional classrooms in East Jerusalem. He spoke of the crowded conditions in the rented buildings that the schools are compelled to use. Schools are currently using every possible centimeter, in every angle, living room, bedroom or caravan. Mr. La'afi related to the High Court of Justice's ruling in 2001, requiring the municipality to build 245 classrooms until the end of 2005. Despite the High Court of Justice's ruling, until 2004 only 13 new classrooms were built, and in 2005 only 35 additional classrooms. Abed Al-Karim La'afi mentioned that every student has a right to 50cm, yet in reality students in East Jerusalem have 20 cm. The schools in East Jerusalem lack laboratories, libraries, yards and playgrounds. A Jewish student receives 5 times more funding than an Arab student in the north of Israel, and he or she receives 6 times more than an Arab student in East Jerusalem. There is approximately a 50% drop-out rate of students in East Jerusalem, mostly due to the lack of space in schools.
 
Mr. Reuven Aberjil, About the Black Panthers as a Chronicle of Struggle.
Reuven Aberjil, one of the founders of the Black Panthers movement in Israel, told the story of the struggle of the Mizrachim (Oriental Jews) in Israel. He spoke of the Jewish immigration waves since the 19th century and up to the establishment of the state of Israel, focusing on the behavior towards the Jewish immigrants from the Arab states at the beginning of the 1950's. Mr. Aberjil described the discriminatory treatment in the absorption of the immigrants from the Arab states: in the preliminary stages they were placed in transit camps, and the means of their assimilation were inferior to those that other groups received. As Mr. Aberjil noted, it is possible to point at discrimination when examining the discourse in the media during that period: the media announced the arrival of the large population group from the Arab states, while at the same time a group of the same size arrived from Europe. Mr. Aberjil related to the comparison that may be made between the Black Panthers and the Arabs in the state, that live in disadvantaged neighborhoods such as Katamon, Wadi Salib and Musrara. The description of the struggle of the Black Panthers raised questions and interest among the students.
 
Critical Pedagogy workshops.
At the end of the first day the students were divided into smaller groups, for critical pedagogy workshops. The objective of the work in the groups was to process the knowledge presented during the first day of the seminar, in relation to the students' educational projects in the organizations. The questions raised, among others: does the students' action maintain the current inequality in education, or does it contribute towards change? Some of the students said that the information presented about East Jerusalem is not relevant to their work, while others stated that they learned a lot from the presentations in the first part of the seminar, things that are important for their educational work.
 
Study tour for understanding the impact of the Separation Barrier upon the education system in Jerusalem.
The objective of the study tour was to expose the students to the reality in Jerusalem, and the influence of the wall or separation barrier upon education in the city. The tour went through neighborhoods in which certain schools did not exist until recently, such as Zur Baher, in which about 1,000 students had to study outside the neighborhood because a building or a lot for construction of a school was not found. This is in comparison to the settlement neighborhood of Har Homa, in which kindergartens and schools were built prior to the arrival of the residents. Further, the tour visited Shofat refugee camp, which is under the jurisdiction of the Jerusalem municipality, yet has been left on the Palestinian side of the Separation Barrier, due to security and demographic objections.
The tour was concluded at Brigham Young University in Mt. Scopus, where the processing of the study tour and conclusion of the seminar took place. After a short plenary session the students were divided into four groups. The group discussions related to the seminar in general, and the study tour in particular, touching upon the difficulties, the learning and conclusions.
In the evaluations filled at the end of the seminar the students expressed a desire and need to participate in an additional program in order to work together and try to examine ways for changing the harsh reality in Jerusalem.
Further, the students expressed interest in an additional seminar that will provide more tools for their work in the organizations.

Training Seminar for Student Activists

Training Seminar for Student Activists, Hadassah Neurim, November 24-25, 2006
Mahapach-Taghir began its activity year 2006/7 with a statewide student seminar that brought together all active students in the organization, and built the pedagogical and political framework. The seminar included 170 students from all seven Mahapach-Taghir communities. The preparation process involved intense work, with roles divided between the statewide team members and the regional coordinators', emphasizing the principle of partnership and dialogue which is an inseparable part of the seminar design process. It was important for the statewide team not to take upon itself the entire role of leading the seminar, but to enable the coordinators, including the new coordinators, to lead the organization of the seminar.
Regarding the planning of the various sessions, a logical flow between the different units was intended, as the issues of each unit were connected, aiming to generate a process of reflection among the students. This emanated from the order of the units, as well as the connections between the national-political-economic which were illustrated throughout the sessions.
 
The following is the order of the units and activities at the seminar:
 
Friday
  • Plenary acquaintance: What is Mahapach-Taghir? Presentation in Hebrew and Arabic. - Tammy Schneider and Kholod Edris.
  • Acquaintance in the community groups, including discussion of expectations. - community coordinators.
  • Why community and student activism? - community coordinators.
  • Lecture: the socio-political situation in Israel - Ephraim Davidi.
  • Acquaintance with the community and the neighborhood. - community coordinators.
  • Social evening: "On a cup of coffee". Alternative café.
 
Saturday
  • Memories of school. - community coordinators.
  • Tracking and exclusion. Lecture in three groups: Tammy Schneider, Haggith Gor Ziv, Kholod Edris.
  • Critical pedagogy - discussions. - community coordinators.
  • Critical pedagogy practice - elective workshops (for example: partnership with parents, reading and writing, educational/pedagogical games, gender in work with children, work with youth, ecology, tackling children violence.)
  • Summary/conclusion in the community groups. - community coordinators.
  • Plenary summary.
 
The informal conversations between students, and the informal encounters throughout the breaks, were very meaningful and created an atmosphere of solidarity, community and dialogue.
 
Palestinian-Jewish partnership in the seminar
The seminar opened with a lecture about Mahapach-Taghir, and its connection to the social situation in Israel. Holding a lecture in both Hebrew and Arabic initiated a dialogue about the meaning of partnership in the organization, and its identity: what is its socio-political agenda towards students of different identities? The lecture in both languages raised sensitive questions relating to language and identity.
 
The concept of partnership was further expressed in the different seminar units: class partnership, Jewish-Palestinian partnership, and partnership in the neighborhood. In addition, a special workshop was devoted to veteran students' critical study of the Nakba, (written of further in detail).
 
Coordinators
The coordinators worked intensively with the students throughout the seminar, both in planning and in facilitation, which also enabled the veteran students' full partnership in the design of the seminar and possibility of facilitating a workshop. Further, the coordinators facilitated units that involved not only students from their community, but also those from other communities, particularly units that deal with pedagogical practice.
 
Veteran students in the seminar
A great number of the veteran students took upon themselves the responsibility of facilitating some of the sessions, which enhanced the learning atmosphere and sharing of knowledge. The ability to learn from the experience of veteran students elicited interesting discussions, and raised dilemmas from previous experience.
Further, a special section of the seminar was designed especially for veteran students in order to promote the creation of a group that will take upon itself to advance student activism through Mahapach-Taghir statewide, and locally in the different communities.
The sessions for veteran students included:
  • Place of veteran students in Mahapach-Taghir - vision. - Nidaa Khalilia-Khatib.
  • What further? From vision to action. - Marcelo Wexler.
  • Critical learning about 1948. Uri Gopher, Zochrot. An important unit that lead to discussion of different narratives, their legitimacy, and possibilities of action for students.
 
Significant accomplishments of the seminar:
  • Seminar designed jointly by the statewide team, the community coordinators, and veteran students.
  • Involvement of many students in the preparations.
  • Strong bonds formed between the coordinators.
  • Diverse and enriching issues discussed in the workshops.
  • Interest that was raised by the seminar among the students, for continuation, and for deepening the connections between students statewide.
  • Political guidance of students who are active through the learning centers.

Seminar for Student Activists

Seminar for Student Activists, Givat Haviva, April 7-8, 2006
The seminar was an initiative of students and coordinators from Mahapach to create a political, ideological platform of civic engagement, for learning about and expanding on different social issues, for considering new horizons of student action, and for establishing ties between various student groups. The seminar was coordinated by Shemi from Mahapach's state-wide team, aided by Itai (Florentine coordinator) and Shirley (former coordinator and “granny” at present). The seminar was led in practice by students from all Mahapach communities, some of which took part in the team that designed the program.
 
Participants:
A total of sixty-three students participated in the seminar, most of them from Mahapach, but also from other organizations and associations (Green Action, Green Course, Commitment to Peace and Social Justice, Women’s Coalition for Just Peace, New Profile, CEGAS - The Committee for Educational Guidance for Arab Students) as well as other students who are not formally members of any organization.
 
Seminar structure:
The seminar opened with a getting acquainted session in which the seminar objectives, its preparation process, its structure, and so forth were laid out.
The seminar was composed of five sessions that were dedicated to various workshops conducted simultaneously (3 to 4 parallel workshops at each time) - three sessions on Friday and two on Saturday.
 
Workshops implemented:
Multi-culturalism -
Itai Meshel and Schachar Agami
Urban planning
Badria Biromi-Kandaleft, Director, Link to the Environment
Is socialism good for the weakened classes? -
Alon (Florentine)
Internet as a tool for protest and social change -
Shirley Caravani
Militarism in education - Denia, New Profile, Kiryat Yovel
The separation fence - Ya’ar (Katamonim) - an interactive workshop with films, simulations, conversations and representations
Women trafficking  - Yul (Florentine)
Palestinian-Jewish dialogue- Amani (Tamra) and Yona (Florentine)
Learning disabilities - an inside look, Hila (Kiryat Shmona)
A space for Palestinian students -identity and belonging
The Wisconsin Plan and the struggle against it -
Ronit Shimoni, Ashkelon
Do social organizations make an impact and how?
Naomi and Doron (Kiryat Yovel)
The relation between civil society organizations and party politics, and our place in this story?
Educational methods
- Abir (Yafia), Maha (Tamra)
Civilian activities, direct, non-violent actions and the struggle against the separationfence in Bilin - Muhamed Hatib, member of theBilin Popular Committee.
Did not take place due to the closure
Education and poverty -
Amir and Yaron (Florentine)
 
Schools in the neighborhoods, tracking, and the connection of economics and education
 
The mentally ill - Yafit and Adi (Florentine)
Teenagers and learning -
Ariel (Katamonim) and Ofri (Kiryat Yovel)
The Law of Return Vs. The Right of Return -
Nihad Boquai (Badil) -
Resource Center for Palestinian Residency and Refugee Rights, Bethlehem
Gynecology without gynecologists -
Shani (Katamonim)
Identity and status - mapping where we are in this story and discussion -
Yonni and Moshe -Mahapach grannies
 
The workshops surfaced a great amount of knowledge and issues of injustice and various struggles against them (the fence, militarism, education, feminism, space, Wisconsin, etc.), and generated different reactions among the students. Towards the end of the seminar we conducted four workshops on these subjects, which were future-oriented and focused on the question - what do we do next? How do we continue from this seminar onwards?
 
The following is a summary of these workshops:
 
Summary sessions - workshops that produced new projects:
 
  1. Wisconsin Plan group:
The team decided to meet on Sunday, 16.4.06 (during Passover holiday), at 10:00 to get an impression of what goes on at the Employment Center in Ashkelon, meet with people participating in the program, study the issue, and later assemble and discuss how to proceed.
An attempt should be made to link between the Ashkelon struggle and the Jerusalem struggle.
Students are in a different position than participants in the Wisconsin Plan in their ability to take on struggles and promote ideas the latter cannot pursue out of fear and concern of losing their monthly stipend.
Many students expressed their interest in joining protests and other activities in the future.
Coordinators:
Ronit Shimoni - 050-7803162
Shirley Caravani - 054-5217363
  
  1. Palestinian-Jewish Partnership group
In the long run: a more general change, leverage the potential of a movement comprising Palestinian and Jewish students and realize it by conducting meetings, creating partnerships and cooperations that do not exist today on the community level. Currently there is no connection.
Proposed activities for next year:
  • meetings between youth from the Jewish and Palestinian communities for joint activities and seminars (with Baladna).
  • summer camp for Jewish and Palestinian children. A joint team will be formed to work on the content and design a plan.
In the short run: towards Independence Day and the Nakba Day we set a date for a study tour and social gathering in Tamra and the uprooted villages in its vicinity (Damun) accompanied by refugees from the village. The tour and gathering is intended for students and residents from all communities.
Tour date: 19.5.2006
A preparatory meeting for the organizing team has been set for Sunday, 30.4.2006 at 17:00 at the offices of Mahapach and Zochrot - 61 Eben Gvirol St., Tel Aviv.
Meeting coordinator: Amir Boltzman (Florentine) - 054-6798136amir_bol@yahoo.com
In addition, Ya’ar invites everyone to join the “Actions Against the Fence Week”
For details: Ya’ar Dagan Peretz (Katamonim) - 054-4584477
 
  1. Feminism and Women workshop
The discussion centered on ways to introduce the feminist discourse that developed in the workshop into Mahapach on several levels:
On the student level - daily summary sessions, study days, etc. Establish in every community a group of students with or without residents.
On the residents level - women empowerment groups and discourse between students and residents
On the youth level - groups of teenage girls, etc
On the national level - there should be a national women’s team that will lead the feminist discourse, think of and develop new, large-scale projects. The participants expressed their desire to talk about the practical aspects of feminism.
Establish a feminist men's group (if they so wish).
Begin on the regional level.
Conduct workshops on women trafficking in all the communities.
For more details:
Julia Krakowa (Florentine) - 0545716567 krakova@gmail.com
 
 
  1. New Directions  
Different needs and directions were mentioned:
  • Expand and develop Mahapach activities in terms of meetings between students from the various communities.
  • Formulate a General Principles document for the activities of Mahapach that will constitute the ideological and organizational framework to which everyone can relate. Phrasing a common agenda. This should be done in as wide a frame as possible because the process itself is important. The students should be a more significant component of the decision making body in Mahapach. It was decided to distribute the strategic plan of Mahapach written in the past (will be posted on the Mahapach forum) and refer to it as a possible basis.
  • Set up a nationwide team of students that will visit and circulate between communities on different occasions and events to study more models and ideas. The idea came up in this weekend seminar.
  • Communication means: founding a national newspaper for Mahapach that will be distributed to the students and residents (in Arabic, Hebrew, and Russian)
  • Connection between the communities on the national level and meetings with students from other political organizations and bodies - open seminars.
  • Turn the existing managing body that is the national link in Mahapach, into a body comprising residents and students.
 
For more information and organizing these activities:
Yaron Sayun (Florentine) - 0778220055; 0546798126ms.yaron@gmail.com
Yona Adelman - 03-5163765; 0545898176 yonnadelman@gmail.com
 
 
Seminar evaluation:
The seminar evaluation reviews several points in time while considering a number of parameters:
 
During the seminar itself we conducted two open feedbacks. The first was on Friday evening after four sessions (three of them elective workshops) in order to hear reactions to the seminar structure, its schedule, planning, etc, in real-time, and so as to examine whether to proceed with it as planned. The feedbacks were highly positive; the complaints were that it was not possible to attend several workshops simultaneously and that workshops were not repeated.
The second feedback was conducted at the end of the seminar. The main points it surfaced are:
  1. Too many workshops conducted in parallel.
  2. Conditions, interest, availability and mix were far better than in the first seminar.
  3. The seminar was not imposed from above but generated from the field and answered the needs of the students.
  4. The seminar gave a stronger feeling of connection to “Mahapach” and of being part of something wider than a day and a community, something more significant.
  5. The level of the contents is very high and provides new knowledge.
  6. Often there is no true openness in the discussions, we are liberal only towards those who think like us, we should also be able to hear other opinions.
  7. Rosa: I thoroughly enjoyed it, more than any other seminar, very refreshing and influential.
  8. It was excellent! Really pumped in new energies and liveliness and a sense of belonging.
 
Further to the seminar - an evaluation meeting will be held with the student team that organized the seminar. I will send a summary of the discussion to everyone. A larger scale evaluation, to a large extent the more significant evaluation regarding the seminar objectives, will be about the various initiatives students suggested in the seminar (as mentioned above). Needless to say that the enrichment students gained through this seminar is a worthy achievement in itself because, as we see it, students who are more aware and more political with a broad world view do a better job in the communities and organizations in which they are active.
 
Seminar achievements:
There were several noticeable achievements:
  • A  large number of participants
  • Substantive amount of involvement and thought in preparation for the seminar invested by students.
  • Relations that developed between students, between the national team and the students and altogether relations at levels that did not exist before.
  • Strong sense of togetherness. Students said their feeling that they have something to give is acknowledged and their opinion is taken into account.
  • Considerable expansion of the knowledge in areas new to the students (militarism, right of return, separation fence, Wisconsin plan, feminism, education).
  • Varied and enriching line of topics.
  • Empowerment for students who showed high involvement on their part thus creating a high level of partnership.
  • The seminar created interest in continuation and in creating new connections, and for deepening the relations between activist students on the national level.
  • The pre-seminar process
  • Politicization of students who volunteer in the learning groups.
  • A great feeling of success, of seminality, of “something significant happened here”.
 
 
My sincerest appreciation and thanks,
Shemi Shabbat, “Mahapach”
Seminar coordinator 

Students

The Partnership works in varied ways to enhance Jewish and Arab students' understanding of the social context of their civic engagement, develop their capabilities to act for social change, and broaden their activism.
  • Community-engaged courses - 
    The Partnership has supported the development of community-engaged courses, academic courses that integrate the social action of students. We encourage students interested in action for change, or student activists seeking to deepen their social knowledge and action, to participate in community-engaged courses. For a list of the courses that we have supported click here. For research papers written by students in community-engaged courses (in Hebrew)  click here

  • Seminars for engaged students - 
    The Partnership holds seminars for student activists, with the participation of student organizations and social change organizations. The seminars provide a setting for open discussion and for development of social and political thought, acquisition of practical tools for social change, creation and upholding of social networks, and reinforcement of the commitment of a new generation of students to act for social justice. 
    To read more about our seminars press here

  • Conferences and study days - 
    Students at institutions of higher education are significant partners in academy-community engagement programs. The Partnership holds academic conferences and study-days for faculty members, students, and social change organizations – to create a shared discourse of social change, setting for reflection and consultation, and exchange of knowledge. 
    For more details press here.

Resources

Report: Student Action for Social Change: Mapping the Present to Build the Future

Dr. Daphna Golan, Prof. Jona Rosenfeld

Shiri Ben Yosef, Hanaa Knaneh, Yael Rosenfeld, Danny Schrire, Ben Schwartz

Hebrew University of Jerusalem, May 2005

Complete Report in English

Complete Report in Hebrew

 

Report: Academy-Community Partnership for Social Change - A Study and Evaluation of Eleven Academic Courses (in Hebrew)
Dr. Israel Katz, Peleg Dor-Haim, Eyal Mazliach and Linda jacob
Zofnat Institute, August 2007

Summary of the report in English

Complete report in Hebrew

Recommended Resources in English

Journals:

American Behavioral Scientist

In 2000 the journal dedicated a special issue to service-learning:

Marullo, Sam and Bob Edwards (eds.) (2000). Service-Learning Pedagogy as Universities' Response to Troubled Times. Special issue of American Behavioral Scientist 43: 741-912.

 

Journal of Community Practice

In 2004 the journal dedicated a special issue to campus-community partnerships:

Soska, Tracy M. and Johnson Butterfield, Alice K. (eds.) (2004). University-Community Partnerships: Universities in Civic Engagement. Special issue ofJournal of Community Practice 12.

 

Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning

Since 1994, publishes research, theory and pedagogy articles related to higher education academic service-learning and since 2009 has expanded to include articles about campus-community partnerships and faculty-engaged scholarship.

 

Service Enquiry 

A series of books exploring the experience of service and volunteering around the world.

Resource Centers

National Service Learning Clearinghouse

Innovations in Civic Participation – Resource Center

i-Core

The Center for Empirical Legal Studies of Decision Making and the Law brings together researchers from different fields from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology. The Center is an initiative of the government of Israel to generate innovative empirical legal research, particularly in the field of decision making and the law. The Center is expected to make a significant intellectual and practical contribution both from an intellectual and a practical perspective. With respect to the former, the studies conducted in the Center shed new light on ongoing debates regarding the way in which the law influences behavior. They answer questions such as: are people rational or are their decisions biased in a systematic fashion; and does the law function merely as a price-setting device, or does it affect behavior in other, more subtle ways? As to the latter, the findings of the studies will likely lend themselves to numerous concrete policy debates. The Center is supported by the I-CORE Program of the Planning and Budgeting Committee and the Israel Science Foundation.

   

i-Core Website

 

 

 

Institute of Criminology

The Institute of Criminology offers graduate courses, for the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, to graduates of social science, law, and other related fields. Each year, between 50 and 70 students are admitted to the graduate program. Along with the Institute's own teaching and research staff, additional teachers are recruited from the Faculty of Law, the Faculty of Social Sciences, other research universities, and professionals who work in the criminal justice field.

The Institute also functions as a research institute. Current research projects include: family violence; rape; white-collar crime; organized crime; women and crime; police violence; police responses to terrorism; explaining crime at place, cross-cultural comparison of aggression and violence; violence in hospital emergency wards; crime among immigrants; drug policy; situational crime prevention; police undercover work; environmental responses to crime; prison terms served in the community; history of social control systems; sociology of law and welfare regulation; sociology of human rights; responses to human rights violations; prisoners' rights; juvenile justice; community control of crime and delinquency; the victim and the criminal justice system.

The Institute cooperates with various criminal justice and welfare agencies in Israel, particularly by organizing symposia, lectures and research consultations. Members of the Institute are active in various national and international scholarly organizations, such as the Israel Council of Criminology, the American Society of Criminology, the Campbell Collaboration, the Academy of Experimental Criminology, and the Deviance and Social Control Committee of the International Sociological Association. Institute faculty members are active in publishing in international as well as Israeli journals, and serve as editors or on the editorial boards of major international journals in the fields of criminology, sociology of law, and victimology. The Journal of Experimental Criminology is housed in the Institue.

An annual public lecture or symposium is held in memory of the founder of the Institute, the late Professor Israel Drapkin. Recent topics have included drug policy, political crime, and policing.
 
 

The Institute of Criminology website (soon)

Institute of Jewish Law

The Israel Matz Institute for Jewish Law at the Faculty of Law of the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, is located on Mount Scopus, in one of the original buildings of the Hebrew University, built in 1925. Since its inception in 1963, on the initiative of the then deputy to the President of the Israel Supreme Court, Prof. (emeritus) Menachem Elon, it is now occupies a leading place in the teaching and researching of Jewish Law. The Institute’s affiliation with both the Faculty of Law and the Institute of Jewish Studies reflects its founders’ goal of combining the research methods in Jewish Law with the classical methods of Jewish Studies. Over the past forty years, the Institute has made major contributions to academic research in the area of Jewish Law and is considered a leader in its field.



The Institute’s main achievements have been in four areas:

  1. It has trained a generation of first-rate scholars, now occupying key positions in Jewish Law research and instruction at universities all over the country.
  2. Books and studies have been published in a wide variety of topics, on a high level of academic excellence. These publications have, among other things, made the literature and sources of Jewish Law more readily available to teachers, students and legal personnel. A monumental undertaking in this area is the responsa index project, aimed at indexing responsa literature in the period of the rishonim (i.e., prior to the fifteenth century).
  3. The Institute publishes a Hebrew Annual of Jewish Law, Shenaton ha-Mishpat ha-Ivri, which is now firmly established as the premier publication in the field. The twenty-five volumes published hitherto present a diversity of studies by scholars of the first rank on classical and modern subjects of Jewish Law. Recently, the Institute was handed over the Jewish Law Annual (English), its future volumes will be published as a part of the Institute’s publications.
  4. The Institute’s library owns a unique, rich and varied collection of volumes in all areas of Halakhic literature, Jewish Law research and related subjects, now considered the most important library of its kind in this country and indeed in the whole world. Its services are at the disposal of students, scholars and jurists.

Recently, the Institute was honored when the Emet Prize 2011 was awarded to two of the senior researchers of the Institute, Prof. Eliav Shochetman and Prof. Berachyahu Lifshitz.

    

  

The Institute of Jewish Law website

 

Minerva Center for Human Rights

The Minerva Center for Human Rights at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Faculty of Law is the preeminent academic center in Israel devoted to human rights research and education.

The Center initiates and facilitates serious discourse and scholarship amongst academic, government and civil society sectors on a very broad range of local and global human rights dilemmas – as well as engaging, educating and contributing to the development of outstanding, committed Hebrew University students as future leaders of social change.

  

The Minerva Center for Human Rights website (soon)

Sacher Institute

The Harry and Michael Sacher Institute for Legislative Research and Comparative Law was established in 1959. Its broad range of activities ever since has been supported by a generous donation from the Sacher Family. The Institute serves as a prominent research arm of the Faculty of Law, as well as a publishing house (the leading in Israel) for legal academic publications.

In its first years, the Institute assisted the Israeli Ministry of Justice and other official agencies in the preparation of legislative materials and by writing commentaries on proposed bills. Today the Institute engages with (and supports) legal research in a variety of fields, through the following means:

Books: The Institute has published hundreds of books and monographs, written mainly in Hebrew, by leading Israeli scholars in all areas of law. We continue to publish books on an ongoing basis, based on a peer-review process that ensures the highest academic level.

Conferences: The Institute organizes international and national conferences, in Israel and abroad, in cooperation with local and foreign research centers, and occasionally sponsors conferences organized by members of the Faculty.

Research Support: The Institute grants each year a post-doctoral fellowships that allows a junior researcher to develop his/her research under the auspices of the Institute, while engaging with Faculty members and becoming integrated in the rich academic activity of the Faculty. In addition, the Institute provides funding for research studies performed by Faculty members.

Journals: Three academic journals are published under the auspices of the Institute: “Misphatim”, the main publication of the Faculty, edited by its students; “Hukim”, a journal focusing on legislative proposals and commentaries; and “Israel Criminology”, the journal of the Israeli Association of Criminology. 

  

  

The Harry and Michael Sacher Institute website

The Aharon Barak Center for Interdisciplinary Legal Research

The Aharon Barak Center for Interdisciplinary Legal Research facilitates, encourages, and coordinates cutting-edge interdisciplinary legal research by scholars from the Faculty of Law, other Hebrew University faculties, and from around the globe.



The Faculty of Law
Established in 1949 as the first law school in Israel, the Faculty of Law is the alma mater of the vast majority of Israeli Supreme Court justices, Israel’s most prominent legal scholars, senior government officials and legal practitioners. The Faculty of Law strives for excellence in research. Many faculty members hold graduate degrees from leading international universities and spend time teaching or conducting research abroad. Legal research at the Faculty has a theoretical and interdisciplinary focus, and scholarly work produced by members of the Faculty of Law figures prominently in leading legal journals.



Aharon Barak

Aharon Barak is the most prominent lawyer, legal scholar, and judge in Israel of his generation. A full professor at the Hebrew University at the age of 36, even prior to this Barak was already known as an international expert in civil law, chairing important international committees in this field. Barak was appointed as Attorney General of Israel at age 39, and three years later (in 1978) he was appointed to the Israeli Supreme Court. In 1995, he was nominated as the President of the Supreme Court of Israel and he served in this position until his retirement in 2006. Barak is considered to be one of the most brilliant and fruitful legal scholars of our time. As a Judge, Barak was the driving force behind the fundamental transformation of Israeli law throughout the last 30 years and the rise of the Supreme Court as an influential and central institution in the protection of democratic values in the Israeli polity. His decisions have shaped almost every field of law, and have had profound impact on the status of this court among the international legal community. While Barak began his career as an expert in civil and commercial law, as a judge he soon became the most influential figure on the bench in public and constitutional law. Subsequently, Barak became increasingly interested in international law and his rulings in this field are now studied by lawyers and scholars around the world. Throughout his career as a judge Barak did not cease his work as a legal scholar and published numerous books on legal interpretation and methodology—some of which have been translated to several languages.


Barak began his association with the Faculty of Law at the Hebrew University as a law student in 1955, going on to become a faculty member and a Dean of the Faculty in 1974-1975. As an Attorney General and Justice of the Supreme Court, Barak continued to teach at the Faculty, and he regards the Faculty not only as his Alma Mater but also as his intellectual home. It was thus only natural that upon Barak's retirement from the bench, the Faculty decided to honor his commitment and devotion to the Hebrew University and his contributions to Israeli law and society through the establishment of the Aharon Barak Center for Interdisciplinary Legal Research.


For detailed CV, see here



The Aharon Barak Center for Interdisciplinary Legal Research

This Center seeks to honor and expand the legacy of Aharon Barak through excellence in interdisciplinary legal research. 

In today’s legal world, legal research is almost always intertwined with research in other disciplines such as economics, sociology and psychology; history, philosophy, and literature. Legal research today also entails collaboration between researchers (both lawyers and social scientists) from different legal and cultural systems. The Faculty of Law at the Hebrew University includes internationally renowned experts in such fields as economic analysis of law, law and criminology, philosophy of law, and behavioral legal studies. 

The Barak Center provides the institutional and organizational framework that enables the Hebrew University to operate in the competitive global environment of contemporary academia. It does so by providing research grants and support for research groups, conferences, and doctoral students who use interdisciplinary methodology for the study of law. The Center aims, in particular, to answer the growing need for competitive working conditions in Israeli academia for brilliant young legal academics who specialize in interdisciplinary research and to enable the Faculty to increase its participation and influence within the global legal-academic community.
 


Structure
The Barak Center is part of the Faculty of Law, and is operated according to Hebrew University regulations for research centers. Aharon Barak serves as the Center’s honorary President. The Academic Director of the Center is appointed from among members of the Faculty, and an Academic Committee sets Center goals and policies and supervises its activities and budgets. 

Professor Assaf Hamdani serves as the Center’s inaugural Academic Director. Professor Alon Harel is Chair of the Center’s Academic Committee. Other members of the Academic Committee include scholars who specialize in various aspects of interdisciplinary legal studies, from the Faculty of Law, the Institute of Criminology, the Center for the Study of Rationality, the School of Education, and the department of International Relations.



Activities
Research Grants: The Center offers research grants to encourage new and innovative interdisciplinary legal research.

Fellowships: The Center offers fellowships to LL.M. and Ph.D. students to encourage the use of interdisciplinary methodology in legal research. In addition, the Center offers postdoctoral fellowships and hosts postdoctoral scholars from abroad.

International Activities: The Center encourages international collaboration between Hebrew University faculty members and scholars from abroad by supporting international conferences.

Academic Publications: The Center supports the publication of books, journals and internet bulletins in relevant research areas. It also supports academic seminars, conferences and forums and, when appropriate, subsequently publishes the resulting collection of papers.

The Clinical Legal Education Center

The Clinical Legal Education Center in the Faculty of Law of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem provides a unique learning experience that integrates academic studies with practical work.

 

Based on the belief that the law is a public resource that should be enjoyed by every person in society, and that every individual is therefore entitled to access to justice and due process, the Center provides pro-bono legal services to a variety of groups in society. Among the groups we provide aid to, are people with disabilities, migrant workers, refugees and asylum seekers, people setting up small businesses, members of the Arab community, youth at risk, individuals subjected to criminal proceedings or those requesting a retrial, ultra-Orthodox women, new immigrant populations, members of the LGTB community and others as well.

 

This legal assistance is provided by law students under the supervision of top attorneys who constitute the Center's staff.

 

You can contact us by phone at 02-5882554, by fax at 02-5882544 or by e-mail at law_clinics@savion.huji.ac.il.

 

You can also follow us on Facebook.

  

  

The Clinical Legal Education Center website (soon)

The Law and Cyber Security Research Program

 

The Law and Cyber Security research program brings together scholars, research fellows and doctoral students from the Hebrew University’s Faculty of Law and the Benin School of Computer Science and Engineering, in order to promote groundbreaking academic research in the field of information technology, law and criminology, which can cultivate collaboration between academia, industry and government. Specifically, the program studies, through using truly inter-disciplinary methods the prevention and regulation of cyber threats and related law enforcement challenges.

As cyberspace — the online world of computer networks and the internet — evolves, so too are associated aspects such as global connectivity, access to data, vulnerable technologies and anonymity, which facilitate the spread of disruptive cyber activities, which have the potential for causing significant damage, and put basic individual rights, such as privacy, under considerable pressure. This has led to a growing debate concerning the very nature of information technology and its influence on the development of new legal doctrine. Since law and law enforcement were primarily developed to resolve activities of a physical nature that occur within a specific territory, today’s transition to a cyberspace has created new challenges which need to be considered within novel parameters of space, reality and dynamics.

New doctrines are being researched in the new Law and Cyber Security research program in several fields of study. For example in international law, issues pertaining to the law of war —devised to regulate wars between standing armies — now need to be extended to cover the uncharted territory of cyber warfare and internet terrorism. In the field of human rights too, concepts of privacy and freedom of expression must be reconceived to address surveillance and information dissemination activities in cyberspace for which there are no precedents, given the immense scope and reach of data flows. Likewise, in criminology, new models need to be developed to address the distinct features of cybercrimes, which differ vastly from traditional crimes, as well as the possibilities and risks of harnessing the internet to combat traditional crime. And in the field of intellectual property the new digital environment creates numerous new challenges in the areas of patent protection, knowhow copyrights and trademarks.

While the law has responded to the challenges arising from information technologies in some areas, in general it has failed to keep up with — and, moreover, preempt — the rapidly evolving developments in information technology. Clearly, there is an urgent need for a new and wholly comprehensive focus on conceptual and practical research. Since Israeli science in general, and computer scientists of the Hebrew University in particular, are longtime leaders in all aspects of internet security and robustness, it is only fitting that their colleagues in the field of law should assume a similar leadership role in the development of legal theory for the cyber era. Here too, the Faculty of Law's intellectual approach is interdisciplinary, with its participants coming from diverse fields such as international law, human rights, military law, intellectual property, and criminology, and interacting with computer science and other forms of scholarship.

 

 

H-CSRC - HUJI Cyber Security Research Center Website 

Law and Criminology in Cyberspace Forum Meeting Schedule

 

Academic Forums and Workshops

Crime Group

The Jerusalem Crime Group is an interdisciplinary forum drawing together scholars from law and the social sciences with a strong interest in research and policy in the field of criminal justice. The group was established to encourage serious cross-disciplinary engagement with complex law enforcement challenges, and as a vehicle for developing critical and innovative academic and policy analysis of core problems facing the criminal justice system. Drawing on its members’ expertise in legal theory, criminal law, criminology, sociology, psychology and research methods, the Group provides a unique forum for critically examining problems that span law and the various social sciences. The Group also encourages engagement between academia and practice by inviting contributions from theoretically minded practitioners, who draw on extensive practical experience with the operation of the criminal justice system. Working papers written by members of the Group and with its support are circulated and discussed by the forum. Papers funded by the Group and discussed in this forum have been published in leading journals in their respective fields.

 

The group meets to discuss its members’ works in progress. Past meetings were devoted to issues such as white-collar crime, speech-related offences, “sentencing lotteries,” the art of the interview in criminology, and Israel’s recent sentencing guideline reform. The group also welcomes foreign criminal law and criminology scholars to take part in its activities.

 

In June, 2015 the Group will conduct a two-day  international conference, bringing together scholars from around the world to discuss “Effective Law Enforcement Initiatives,” with a focus on empirically-based research.

 

The Group’s activities are generously supported by the Lord Taylor Fund, established by the British Friends of the Hebrew University Law School.

 

The forum is co-chaired by Dr. Barak Ariel (Criminology: barak.ariel@mail.huji.ac.il) and Dr. Binyamin Blum (Law: blum@huji.ac.il)

Publications:

No. Title Author
1 Good for What Purpose?: Social Science, Race and Proportionality Review in New Jersey Prof. David Weisbrud
2 The regulation of speech: a normative investigation of criminal law prohibitions of speech Prof. Alon Harel
3

Breach of Public Trust - Should it be a Crime?

Prof. Miri Gur-Arye
4 On Hate and Equality Prof. Alon Harel and Gideon Parchomovsky
5 Crime and the perception of social stress and solidarity: the role of education Prof. Simha F. Landau
6 A Failure to Prevent Crime-Should it be criminal? Prof. Miri Gur-Arye
7 Can Freedom of Expression Survive Social Trauma? The Israeli Experience Prof. Miri Gur-Arye
8 Reliance on a Lawyer's Mistaken Advice-Should it be an Excuse from Criminal Liability? Prof. Miri Gur-Arye
9 Senior Public Figure Offenders and the Criminal Justice System: The Public's Perception Prof. Simha F. Landau, Prof. Leslie Sebba and Prof. David Weisbrud
10 Child Protection or Child Liberation? Reflections on the Movement to Ban Physical Punishment by Parents and Educators Prof. Leslie Sebba

European Law Forum

Intellectual Property, Law and Technology Forum

The Faculty’s Intellectual Property Forum focuses on research and public activities in the areas of IP. The Forum emphasizes critical, interdisciplinary and comparative research in the area of IP. The faculty’s team in the area of IP incudes: Dr. Katya Assaf, Dr. Guy Pessach and Dr. Michal Shur-Ofry. In addition to an ongoing IP workshop, the forum hosts visiting professors in the area of IP and collaborates with other bodies and research centers dedicated to the area of IP.


Visiting professors in recent years included: Professor Martin Adelman (George Washington University); Professor Jane Ginsburg (Columbia University); Professor Katherine Strandburg (NYU); Professor Barton Beebe (NYU) and Sir Robin Jacob (UCL).


The forum also spearheads an annual advanced IP research seminar in collaboration with WIPO – the World Intellectual Property Organization which brings together research students and professors from a variety of universities including: The Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Intellectual Property and Competition Law, Munich; VU University of Amsterdam; the Munich Intellectual Property Law Center (MIPLC), Munich; the School of Law, George Washington University, Washington, D.C.; the Centre for International Intellectual Property Studies (CEIPI), University of Strasbourg; the Department of Commercial Law, HANKEN School of Economics, Helsinki; the Intellectual Property, Information & Communications Law Program, Michigan State University; the School of Law, University of Geneva; the Stanford Law School (SLS), Stanford University, California; University of Connecticut, Hartford.


For further information and inquires please contact: Dr. Guy Pessach at guy.pessach@mail.huji.ac.il

International Law Forum

What is the International Law Forum?

The International Law Forum is an academic center devoted to the more effective development of international law and policy, by supporting experts and scholars in the field. Since its establishment in 2004, the Forum has sought to provide a medium through which outstanding research, review, public debate, and the widespread dissemination of international law issues could be pursued. 

 

What are the Forums' Goals?

The Forum aims to facilitate the assembly and dissemination of information pertinent to current developments in International Law. Other activities of the Forum aim to improve the manner in which international law is interpreted, and subsequently utilized by States, from within their domestic spheres.

 

Forum Activities

In pursuit of its goals, the Forum actively engages interested academics, advanced students, government officials, lawyers and NGO activists from both Israel and abroad, and brings them together in one location to present their research findings and opinions.
The Forums' current range of activities includes:
 
  1. Weekly seminars: In the seminars, research papers are presented and recent developments in international law are discussed. The program for the coming Semester is available here.
     
  2. Year in Review: The Forum organizes an annual meeting that aims to discuss the major developments in international law in the passing year. 
     
  3. International conferences: The Forum organizes conferences  and symposiums on key international law issues and developments. See here to find out more about the next conference. 
     
  4. Research projects: The Forum initiates the establishment of specific study groups in order to study in-depth specific international law issues. 
     
  5. Student Activities: such as local and international moot court competitions are co-ordinated through the Forum. Fantastic opportunities to apply for scholarships, or internships with international tribunals may also be advertised. See here.
     
  6. Publications: The Forum publishes online research papers on international law issues. You can view these papers on the award winning Social Science Research Network site, otherwise known as SSRN. See http://papers.ssrn.com.


Prominent Israeli guest speakers at Forum events have included senior government officials from the Ministry of Justice and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Israeli Supreme Court President, the Israeli Attorney General, and the Israeli Defence Force Advocate General. The regular presence of speakers of this caliber, emphasizes both the size and quality of the Forum, and illustrates one of the many ways in which the Forum encourages interdisciplinary communication- making it an excellent interface between the Israeli and global community, and a vibrant, up-to-date centre from which to disseminate new concepts and information on International Law. 


By engaging scholars from both Israel and abroad, the Forum has established itself as a focal point for research work undertaken worldwide. In 2008-2009 the Forum aims to expand on and secure the services it provides by strengthening its administration and establishing a permanent legal clinic focused on International Law.

   

Meetings' Program – 1st Semester, 2016-2017

The meetings of the International Law Forum in the coming semester will take place on Tuesdays, 14:30-16:00 at the teachers' seminar room (room 119) in the Faculty of Law. Reading materials will be distributed in advance prior to each meeting. Each meeting will begin by a short presentation by the speaker, followed by a round-table discussion. All meetings will be conducted in English. The meetings' program (which is subject to changes – to be announced in advance) is as follows:

   

Topics

Speakers

Date

Opening Session:

Brexit, EU Law and International Law

Prof. Malcolm N. Shaw

Prof. Guy Harpaz

8/11/16

International Courts in the Arab World

Prof. Cesare Romano

22/11/16

Updates on Developments in International Law

TBA

29/11/16

Justice for Foxes or Justice for Hedgehogs?

Dr. Maria Varaki

6/12/16

WTO Appellate Body

Prof. Rob Howse

20/12/16

Geopolitics and Culture in the United Nations Human Rights Committee

Ms. Vera Shikhelman

3/1/17

TBA

Prof. Jan Wouters

10/1/17

National Identities and the Right to SelfDetermination of Peoples: 'Civic Nationalism Plus' in Israel and Other Multinational StatesDr. Hilly Moodrick-Even Khen7/3/17
International Investment Law and International Human Rights

Prof. Moshe Hirsch  

Prof. Steffen Hindelang

14/3/17
Legal advisers during warfare: Film screening and discussion - Eye In the Sky

Major General (Ret.) Danny Efroni

Adv. Pnina Sharvit Baruch

21/3/17
Updates on Developments in International LawTBA25/4/17
Comparative Law and Human Rights: Why Compare Human Rights?Prof. Samantha Besson9/5/17
TBAProf. Christine Kaufmann13/6/17
A session in honor of Sir Nigel Rodley: The tale of a champion of human rightProf. Yuval Shany27/6/17

 

Other forums and conventions

Final event of the National Competition on International Humanitarian Law

Dear Colleagues, 

The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) is pleased to invite you to the final event of the Seventh National Competition on International Humanitarian Law (IHL) for students in Israel.

The event will take place on Thursday, November 14, 2013 at 16:45 at Mishkenot Sha'ananim – Jerusalem. An invitation is attached here.

Please RSVP to: eaboresi@icrc.org

We look forward to seeing you

The Joint International Humanitarian Law (IHL) Forum

ALMA and the Radzyner School of Law of the Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) would like to invite you to the next session of the Joint International Humanitarian Law Forum. The session will be held on October 30, 2013, at 18:30 in room S4 in the IDC.

In this session Adv. Yaniv Roznai will present his new paper:

"Cracking the Nuc" in the Legal Field: An Israeli Attack on Iran's Nuclear Facilities From an International Law Perspective


Workshop- Economic and Social Rights in National Constitutions

The Leonard Davis Institute for International Relations and the Department of International Relations (Doctoral Workshop) will be hosting on Tuesday, June 17, 2013,  Prof, Courtney Jung from the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto.

Prof. Jung will deliver a talk on "Economic and Social Rights in National Constitutions".  The talk will take place within the framework of the doctoral workshop for IR Ph.D. students, on Tuesday June 17, 2013, between 1630 and 1800 in Room 5420 Social Sciences.

 

Conference- Law & Security: Perspectives from the Field and Beyond

An invitation is attached here.

Criminal law workshop event - torture

On Monday, June 17th, the Criminal Law workshop will host prof. David Luban (Georgetown   university), who will present a chapter from his book: Defining Torture in Law and in Life.

The workshop will take place between 18:30-20:00 in room 119 at the Law Faculty building.

The Fiscal Crisis and how it has changed the EU: A Legal Perspective

Prof. Dr. Jörn Axel Kämmerer (Bucerius Law School, Hamburg) will discuss the topic this Tuesday (June 11th).

See attached invitation.

A workshop on the history of international law

On Tuesday, May 28th, The workshop on the history of law would be hosting prof. Rande Kostal from the University of Western Ontario.

Prof. Kostal will present his book: 

Laying Down the Law:  The United States and the Legal Reconstruction of Germany and Japan, 1945-49

Excerpts from his book are attached here.

The workshop will be conducted at 16:30-18:00 at room 119.

Research

Call for Pre-Proposals

See the attached file.

  

SSRN Publications of Forum Members

Moot courts and competitions

ICRC

ICRC National Competition

The National IHL Competition is a four-day event organized by the International Red Cross and Red Crescent delegation in Israel. During the competition, teams of three students from different Israeli academic institutions participate in several rounds of simulations that not only test their knowledge of international humanitarian law but also their ability to apply it to real-life situations (such as giving legal advice on the legitimacy of bombing a bridge which is used to transport weapons to enemy troops but is also essential to the delivery of essential food supplies to the civilian population). 

The object and purpose of the event is to educate and familiraise students with the different aspects and delicate balances within IHL. The students are not only required to acquire a vast knowledge in international law and in particular in IHL, but they also to learn how to advocate such rules in accordance with their role in the simulations.The object and purpose of the event is to educate and familiraise students with the different aspects and delicate balances within IHL. The students are not only required to acquire a vast knowledge in international law and in particular in IHL, but they also to learn how to advocate such rules in accordance with their role in the simulations. 

The winning team will receive the IHL Competition Award and will be granted a prize by the organizing committee - sponsorship to the Pictet international IHL competition (provided that the team applies and is admitted to the latter competition separately). It is noteworthy that ever since the beginning of the national competition, at least one Israeli team has managed to get admitted to the international competition. Moreover, the Israeli national competition has produced the winning team of the international competition in 2010 and 2011 (the Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya) and in 2012 the two teams respresnting Israeli academic institutions have made it to the semi-final (Hebrew University and Interdisciplinary Center). 

Troughout the years, many team representing Israeli academic institutions have participated in the competition (including Haifa University, Tel-Aviv University, Bar-Ilan University, Hebrew University, Sha'arei Mishpat College, Ramat-Gan College, Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya, Ono Academic College and College of Management). 

Each participating team is trained by coaches provided by their hosting academic institutions and are granted academic points for their participation in the competition. 

Jessup

Jessup Moot Court Competition 

About Jessup

The Phillip C. Jessup Moot Court Competition is the largest and most prestigious moot court competition in the world. Students from more than 80 countries and 550 law schools compete each year in regional competitions for the distinction of proceeding to the International Rounds. Held every spring in Washington, D.C, the International Rounds are conducted together with the Annual Conference of theAmerican Society of International Law (ASIL). The Competition is organized by the International Law Student Association (ILSA). Simulating a fictional dispute between States brought before the International Court of Justice – the judicial organ of the United Nations – the competition requires each participating team to prepare detailed oral and written pleadings, arguing both the applicant and respondent positions of the case.

 

Thousands of law students from all around the world work yearlong on the Jessup problem, which tackles crucial questions of international law. Only one Israeli team can advance to the international rounds. Usually, a national competition is held annually in Tel Aviv for the purpose of determining which school team should proceed. The Hebrew University has participated in Jessup since 2007, and has since claimed the uninterrupted honour of proceeding to the International Championships. Hebrew University students have additionally demonstrated to be extremely talented in their international performances. In 2008, they achieved sixth place (from approximately 90 teams) in the preliminary rounds, and advanced automatically to the octo-final rounds; whilst in 2009 the Hebrew University team was rated amongst the top twenty-four teams (from approximately 110 teams), and went on to participate in the advanced rounds. Several team members have also been entered on the list of the top 100 oralists, and the team's memorials were graded among the top 15 (11th place in 2008, 13th place in 2009). The 2010-2011 team won all four rounds in the preliminary stages and was ranked 8. The team went to compete in the advanced rounds and for the first time in the Faculty’s history made it to the quarter-finals. Their written memorials were ranked among the top 10 best written submission (10th place). The 2011-2012 team continued this tradition of success, finishing the preliminary rounds in 7th place and its written submissions being ranked 6th. More recently, the 2012-2013 team equalled the University's record by reaching the quarter-finals of the competition – losing to the competition finalists – in a year in which over 550 institutions around the world participated. For the first time, all the University's oralists eligible for ranking finished in the top 50. Most recently, the 2013-2014 Hebrew University team narrowly lost on a split decision to the finalist team in the competition. Competition organizers and judges have been repeatedly and deeply impressed by the excellent performance of Hebrew University students.

 

For more information, see the Jessup site: http://www.ilsa.org/jessup

 

Hebrew University Teams

 

Hebrew University Jessup teams consist of 4 to 5 specially selected students from the Faculty of Law, who spend the year receiving intensive training in International Law. Particular attention is paid to improving research, writing, and litigation skills of contestants under the tutelage of Adv Tal Mimran and Ori Pomson (2014-2015).

 

After committing themselves to a period of substantial research during the fall semester, the Jessup team prepares written memorials addressed to the International Court of Justice based on the competition’s case (the Compromis). The team then presents oral arguments at the Regional Competition in Tel Aviv, which takes place in February of the competition year. The team who wins the Regional Competition proceeds to the International Rounds in Washington D.C.

 

If you are interested in pursuing an opportunity to partake in Jessup please contact Ori Pomson at: ori.pomson@mail.huji.ac.il

 

The Current Team 2015-2016

 

Coaches: Adv. Tal Mimran and Ori Pomson

  Rebecca Baskin

Rebecca is a second year student at the Law Faculty, and has received a bachelor degree magna cum laude in International Relations and Middle Eastern Studies, also at the Hebrew University. Rebecca was born and raised in Toronto, Canada and immigrated to Israel in 2009. She did her military service as a basic training commander in the Air Force. During her international relations studies, Rebecca participated in the International Committee of the Red Cross’ international humanitarian law competition, and the following year coached the Hebrew University teams in this competition. During her time at the Hebrew University, Rebecca has worked as a research assistant focusing on the evolution of Iraqi personal status law, and as the coordinator of an interdisciplinary doctoral program at the Law Faculty's Minerva Center for Human Rights. She is currently the student assistant for the Faculty's International Law Forum. 

     
  Shahar Brukner

Shahar is a third year student in the joint Law and Economics program at the Hebrew University. He graduated from the Hebrew Reali School in Haifa, where he was also an active Scout in charge of guiding several age groups. Following high school, Shahar served in the 12th Battalion of the Golani Brigade as a squad leader. After finishing his service, he worked as the tribe leader of the Carmel Scouts tribe, the largest one in the Haifa region. Last year, Shahar took part in the Law Faculty’s International Human Rights clinic, where he led a program granting health insurance to asylum-seeking minors. He currently works as a research assistant in the Israeli Supreme Court’s research department.

     
  Michal Goffer 

Michal is a second year student at the Law Faculty. She studied at Ort Kiryat Tivon High School, where she was active in the community and in the Noar Oved Velomed youth movement. Following graduation, Michal served in Naval Intelligence as an analyst and coordinated between the forces at sea and headquarters. In the first year of her studies, she volunteered in the “Adopt a Grandparent” program, where she aided an elderly woman throughout the year. This year, Michal is part of the team representing students before the university’s disciplinary committee.

     
  Stav Zeitouni

Stav is a second year student at the Hebrew University, double majoring in Law and Psychology. She graduated from Shoham High School, where she was also active in the local Scouts tribe, and served as an Intelligence officer in the IDF. Prior to university, Stav worked as a trail guide at a YMCA summer camp in northern Minnesota. In her first year of studies, she took part in a dialogue scholarship involving Jewish and Arab students and volunteered in the “Speaking Hebrew” program, where she taught young women from Issawiya Hebrew. Stav currently volunteers in the Jerusalem Rape Crisis Center’s legal accompaniment department.

 

     
 

Tal Mendelson

Tal is a second year student of Law and English Literature. She served in the Intelligence Corps of the IDF as a commander in basic and advanced training courses and as a researcher. Tal is a member of the Hebrew University Debating Society; along with her partner, she won the Israeli Debating Championships for junior speakers and competed in the European University Debating Championships. In her first year of studies, Tal volunteered at the Hebrew University Law Students' Alumni Association, and she currently works as an instructor of high-school debating.

Jessup Archive

Jessup Archive

Jessup Moot Court Competition 

About Jessup

The Phillip C. Jessup Moot Court Competition is the largest and most prestigious moot court competition in the world. Students from more than 80 countries and 550 law schools compete each year in regional competitions for the distinction of proceeding to the International Rounds. Held every spring in Washington, D.C, the International Rounds are conducted together with the Annual Conference of the American Society of International Law (ASIL). The Competition is organized by the International Law Student Association (ILSA).

Simulating a fictional dispute between States brought before the International Court of Justice- the judicial organ of the United Nations, the competition requires each participating team to prepare detailed oral and written pleadings, arguing both the applicant and respondent positions of the case. Thousands of law students from all around the world work yearlong on the Jessup problem, which tackles crucial questions of international law. Only one Israeli team can advance to the international rounds. A national competition is held annually in Tel Aviv for the purpose of determining which school team should proceed. The Hebrew University has participated in Jessup since 2007, and has since claimed the uninterrupted honour of proceeding to the International Championships. Hebrew University students have additionally proved extremely talented in their international performances. In 2008, they achieved sixth place (from approximately 90 teams) in the preliminary rounds, and advanced automatically to the octo-final rounds; whilst in 2009 the Hebrew University team was rated amongst the top twenty-four teams (from approximately 110 teams), and went on to participate in the advanced rounds. Several team members have also been entered on the list of the top 100 oralists, and the team's memorials were graded among the top 15 (11th place in 2008, 13th place in 2009). The 2010-2011 team won all four rounds in the preliminary stages and was ranked 8. The team went to compete in the advanced rounds and for the first time in the school's history has made it to the quarter-finals. Their written memorials were ranked among the top 10 best written submission (10th place). The 2011-2012 team continued this tradition of success, finishing the preliminary rounds in 7th place and its written submissions being ranked 6th. Most recently, the 2012-2013 team equalled the University's record by reaching the quarter-finals of the competition – losing to the competition finalists – in a year in which over 550 institutions around the world participated. For the first time, all the University's oralists eligible for ranking finished in the top 50: David Zlotogorski (36), Ori Pomson (36) and Maya Freund (41). Competition organizers and judges have been repeatedly and deeply impressed by the excellent performance of Hebrew University students.


For more information, see the Jessup site: http://www.ilsa.org/jessup


 
Hebrew University Teams

 

Hebrew University Jessup teams consist of 4 to 5 specially selected students from the Faculty of Law, who spend the year receiving intensive training in International Law. Particular attention is paid to improving research, writing, and litigation skills of contestants under the tutelage of Adv. Tal Mimran and Ori Pomson (2013-2014).

 

After committing themselves to a period of substantial research during the fall semester, the Jessup team prepares written memorials addressed to the International Court of Justice based on the competition’s case (the Compromis). The team then presents oral arguments at the Regional Competition in Tel Aviv, which takes place in February of the competition year. The team who wins the Regional Competition proceeds to the International Rounds in Washington D.C.

 

If you are interested in pursuing an opportunity to partake in Jessup please contact Ori Pomson at: ori.pomson@mail.huji.ac.il

 

 

The Current Team 2014-2015

 

Coaches: Adv. Tal Mimran and Ori Pomson

  

  Talila Devir

 

Talila is a second year student in the joint law and international relations program at the Hebrew University. For the past year and a half, Talila has been volunteering at the Jerusalem centre for assisting refugees and asylum seekers in realising their rights. Talila studied for two years at an international high school in Costa Rica which is part of the United World College education movement. During these two years, Talila volunteered in a number of programs, including clown care in Nicaragua, providing sports activities for persons with disabilities through the Special Olympics program and teaching Hebrew at the international school. Talila did her military service in a unit in the intelligence branch and also served as a commander in an advanced training course. During her service, Talila volunteered in providing educational assistance in the Mesila centre.

     
  Tamar Drori

 

Tamar is a second year student in the joint law and international relations program at the Hebrew University. Tamar studied at the Mevo’ot Irron school, where she participate in the “Eina’im Aherot” program for promoting strengthening of ties between Jewish and Arab youths, which included her participating in delegation to New York. In addition, Tamar volunteered in the Magen David Adom organisation. Tamar served in the IDF Spokesperson Brigade, where she worked in the printed press department and alongside the most senior journalists and editors in Israel. Following her military service, Tamar volunteered for a number of months in a children’s centre in Arusha, Tanzania. In her first year at the Hebrew University, Tamar participated in the Model United Nations society and represented it in competitions. Additionally, Tamar participated in the Department of International Relation’s debate society.

     
  Danny Rosenblatt

 

Danny is a third year student in the law faculty. He emigrated from the United States after high school, and following army service completed his bachelor’s degree in history at Bar Ilan University before commencing his legal studies at the Hebrew University. He represented the faculty at the annual European International Model United Nations (TEIMUN) in The Hague during his second year, where he was awarded best delegate. Danny currently serves as a member of the editorial board of Israel Law Review.

     
  Daniel Shil Szriber

 

Daniel is an LL.M. student specialising in international law. Daniel graduated from the Law School of the Pontifical Catholic University of São Paulo, Brazil. During his studies, he worked as an intern in different Brazilian law offices specialising in commercial law, M&A and arbitration. Additionally, as an undergraduate student, Daniel took part in the Willem C. Vis International Commercial Arbitration Moot as a researcher, speaker and assistant coach. Daniel was also a co-founder and the first vice-president of the Brazilian Association of Arbitration Students (ABEARB).

     
 

Nir Weintraub

 

Nir is a third year student at the Law Faculty and has received bachelor’s degrees in international relations and communication. Nir was born in Jerusalem and lived in the United States until the age of 10, when he returned to Jerusalem and where he has been living ever since. Nir did his military service in the Kfir Brigade. During his international relations studies, Nir participated in the International Committee of the Red Cross’ international humanitarian law competition, and two years later coached the Hebrew University team in this competition. Additionally, Nir worked as a teaching assistant in Hebrew University Department of International Relations’ international law course. Nir is currently a member of the Israel Law Review editorial board and has been active in the Law Faculty’s clinic for the rights of persons with disabilities. Nir also works in legal firm which focuses on constitutional and administrative law, in addition to being a research assistant on labour law in the Faculty.

The Current Team 2013-2014

 

Coaches: Adv. Tal Mimran and Ori Pomson

 

    Gali Rosenstein

 

Gali is a second year student in the law and English literature program. Additionally, she is the deputy head of the Yerushalmiyot women's empowerment organisation and works in the Foreign Ministry's situation room. During her first year, Gali volunteered in the Yotzim Laderch ("Embarking") project, assisting former ultra-orthodox students. Gali served for five years as an officer and a first lieutenant commander in the Army Spokesperson unit, and later in the International Intelligence Cooperation unit. Gali previously volunteered for a year on behalf of the Scouts movement in the moshava of Yavniel and she also participated as a counsellor and in the movement's activities. She partook in a number of youth delegations to the United States on behalf of the Scouts, her school and the Tel Aviv municipality.

     
    Nitzan (Fisher) Conforti

 

Nitzan is a second year law student. Nitzan was born in Israel and lived in Los Angeles during her youth, where, in high school, she studied in a program for excellency in English literature and history. She began her army service in 2008, where she served in Army Radio and finished the Army Station journalists' course with excellence. During here four and a half years of service, Nitzan an international news correspondent and editor for Army Radio and she was also editor for the current affairs and news programs. She is married to Itamar.

     
    Nuphar Gafni

 

Nuphar is a second year law and business administration student at the Hebrew University. During high school, Nuphar was a councillor in Maccabi T'zair youth movement and was an active member of the Seeds of Peace organisation. Nuphar completed her army service as an officer in the Intelligence Corps and discharged as a 2nd lieutenant. As a student, Nuphar represented the Law Faculty in the annual Model United Nations in Szeged, Hungary and was awarded with the prize for the "best delegation" with her teammates. Nuphar also volunteered in a student project that supports and assists former ultra-orthodox students in their studies.

     
    Shai Luchtenstein 

 

Shai is a third year law student. He is 26 years of age and grew up in Ramat Hasharon. Shai served as an officer in a recon unit of the IDF armoured corps. During his university studies, he participated in the legal clinic for disability rights and in the European International Model United Nations (TEIMUN) in The Hague. Shai also served as a tutor in the assistance program for students who are not fluent in Hebrew.

     
 

Tomer Treger

 

Tomer is a second year law and English literature student. In his youth, Tomer studied at the International School in Bangkok, Thailand. Later, Tomer continued to be more interested and active in international affairs and was involved in the Seeds of Peace organisation in the United States and the Tevel b'Tzedek ("The Earth – in Justice") organisation in Nepal. During his first year of studies, Tomer participated in the Hebrew University's Model United Nations program and represented it in competitions. He served for four years in an elite IDF combat unit. Tomer currently translates poetry and literary texts and volunteers in an organisation for empowering youth in east and west Jerusalem.

ICC

The International Criminal Court Competition


The International Criminal Court, as the first permanent institution set up to try alleged perpetrators of the most horrific crimes against humanity, has drawn much interest amongst lawyers and non-lawyers alike. Nowhere is this more appropriate than amongst the lawyers and policy makers of the future. Thus, theInternational Criminal Law Network (ICLN) has developed the ICC Trial Competition. While there exist a number of established moot court competitions, the ICC Trial Competition is unique in its direct focus on ICC proceedings and international criminal law. In 2011, the International Criminal Court also recognized the ICLN ICC Trial Competition as the only official English International Criminal Court moot court competition in the world. The competition gives a wide scope of advocacy in allowing students not only to take on the role of prosecutor or defence counsel, but also that of victims' counsel. The judges are established and highly respected practitioners in the field of international criminal law and are comprised of both lawyers and internationally renowned judges from the ICC and ICTY themselves.


The purpose of the ICC Trial Competition is threefold:

  1. To allow top law students worldwide to improve their knowledge of international criminal law in practice, and in particular, the ICC and its proceedings.
  2. To provide students with the opportunity to become familiar with world-famous institutions in The Hague such as the ICC, the ICTY, the OPCW, the International Court of Justice and the Peace Palace Library.
  3. To enhance knowledge about the Rome Statute within countries that have yet to ratify it, by providing the top legal minds of the future from both Member and non Member States an opportunity to learn more about the ICC.


For the 2013 edition, a record number of 37 teams will be participating, from 27 countries worldwide! The 6th edition of the ICLN ICC Trial Competition will take place from 21 until 26 April 2013 in The Hague, the Netherlands. The finals of the Competition will take place at the ICC and will be adjudicated by actual ICC Judges!

In April 2013, Faculty students will participate in the 6th edition of the ICLN ICC Trial Competition at The Hague. This will be the second year in which faculty students participate in this competition: last year's team included Adam Shahaf, who is the assistant coach for this year's team. The team begun working this summer, but accelerated the pace of its work once it received the problem case in early November. 



The Hebrew University Team
2012-2013
The team is coached by Dr. Rotem Giladi. Its participation in the Competition is sponsored by the Minerva Center for Human Rights, with the support of the Law Faculty and the Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
 

Yulia Kniazev
Yulia was born in Minsk, Belarus in 1987, and moved to Israel with her family in 1994. She grew up in Arad and studied at Ort Zimetbaum, Class of 2006. Yulia served in the IDF between the years 2006-2009 as an International Relations Officer. Currently, she is studying Llb Law and International Relations at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Class of 2013. 



Eitan Kaplansky 
Born in Chicago, Illinois in 1988, and moved to Israel with his family in 1999. Studied at Yeshivat Ner Tamid in Hashmonaim, Class of 2006. Currently studying law at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (LLB), Class of 2015. 



Sharon Aviram 
Sharon was born in 1987 in Tel Aviv, Israel. She graduated from Maccabim-Reut High School, Class of 2005. Sharon served in the IAF between the years 2005-2011 as an interceptor officer. Today, Sharon is a second year Law student in Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Israel. She is an alumnus of the StandWithUs Israel Fellowship of 2012. 



Eitan Smith 
Born 1988 in Jerusalem. Studied at the Hebrew University Secondary School (leyada), Jerusalem, Class of 2006. Today studies at the Hebrew University Faculty of Law in the Law& Business Management (M.A) Program, class of 2012. 

Links

Think Tanks

BESA Center for Strategic Studies (Bar-Ilan University)

www.biu.ac.il/Besa

Harry S. Truman Institute for Peace (Hebrew University)

www.truman.huji.ac.il

International Policy Institute for Counter-Terrorism (ICT)

www.ict.org.il

Israel Democracy Institute

www.idi.org.il

Israel Policy Forum

www.israelpolicyforum.org

Jaffee Center for Strategic Studies (Tel Aviv University)

www.tau.ac.il/jcss/

 

Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs

www.jcpa.org

Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs

www.jinsa.org

Jewish People Policy Planning Institute (JPPPI)

www.jpppi.org.il

Leonard Davis Institute For International Relations

www.davis.huji.ac.il

Myers-JDC-Brookdale Institute

www.brookdale-en.pionet.com

Present Tense Institute for Creative Zionism

http://creativezionism.weebly.com

Tami Steinmetz Center for Peace Research (T.A.U.)

www.tau.ac.il/peace

Taub Center for Social Policy Studies in Israel

www.taubcenter.org.il

Washington Institute for Near East Policy

www.washingtoninstitute.org

Research on international law

ASIL Guide to Electronic Resources for International Law

http://www.asil.org/resource/humrts1.htm#Section5

 

United Nations Treaty Collection

http://untreaty.un.org/

International Law Commission

http://www.un.org/law/ilc/

Electronic Information System for International Law

http://www.eisil.org/

European Society of International Law

http://www.esil-sedi.eu/english/

American Society of International Law

http://www.asil.org/

Harvard International Law Journal Online

http://www.harvardilj.org/

Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, Heidelberg

http://www.mpil.de/ww/en/pub/news.cfm

Lauterpacht Centre for International Law, Cambridge

http://www.lcil.cam.ac.uk/

Jean Monnet Program at NYU

http://www.jeanmonnetprogram.org/

Institute for International Law and Justice at NYU

http://www.iilj.org/

Erik Castrén Institute of International Law and Human Rights, Helsinki

http://www.helsinki.fi/eci/

Jus Cogens: Recent Developments in International Law: http://www.juscogens.net/

Journals of international law

International Law Reporter

http://ilreports.blogspot.co.il/

 

Oxford Journals

http://www.oxfordjournals.org/subject/law/

 

Cambridge Journal of International and Comparative Law

http://www.cjicl.org.uk/

 

Wiley- General and Introductory Law

http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-351021.html

 

Human Rights Review

http://link.springer.com/journal/12142

 

The International Journal of Human Rights

http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/fjhr20

 

Kluwer Law Online journals

http://www.kluwerlawonline.com/index.php?area=Journals

Israel

Israel’s Supreme Court

http://www.court.gov.il/heb/home.htm

Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs

http://www.mfa.gov.il/mfa

President of Israel

http://www.president.gov.il/defaults/default_en.asp

Israal Government Portal:

http://www.gov.il/

Israel Defense Forces

http://dover.idf.il/

Bank of Israel

http://www.bankisrael.gov.il/

Israel's Ministry of Trade

http://www.moit.gov.il/

Israel's State Comptroller and Ombudsman

http://www.mevaker.gov.il/serve/site/english/index.asp

Israel's Central Bureau of Statistics

http://www.cbs.gov.il

Manufacterers Association of Israel

http://www.industry.org.il/

Israel Export and International Cooperation Institute

http://www.export.gov.il/

European Forum at the Hebrew University: Links to Government and Official Bodies and Research and Education in Israel

http://www.ef.huji.ac.il/ef/links/Israel.shtml

Economic law

World Trade Organization

http://www.wto.org

2012 WTO news

http://www.wto.org/english/news_e/news_e.htm

 

World Bank

http://www.worldbank.org

International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development

www.ictsd.org


International Development Research Centre

www.idrc.org


Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

http://www.oecd.org

United Nations Conference on Trade and Development

www.unctad.org


International Economic Law and Policy Blog

http://worldtradelaw.typepad.com/


Trade Law Center for Southern Africa

http://www.tralac.org/

ASIL International Economic Law Interest Group

http://www.asil.org/economiclaw/index.html

European Union

External Trade
http://ec.europa.eu/trade/

ישרדISERD 

http://www.iserd.org.il


האיגוד הישראלי ללימודי אירופה

www.biu.ac.il/soc/iasei

אתר הפורום האירופי של האוניברסיטה העברית

http://www.ef.huji.ac.il/

Friedrich Ebert Stiftung: עלון היחסים העסקיים בין האיחוד האירופי לישראל

http://www.fes.org.il/hebrew/israel_eu.asp

European Law Blog

http://europeanlawblog.eu/?page_id=75

International Courts and tribunals

Project on International Courts and Tribunals

http://www.pict-pcti.org/

International Court of Justice

http://www.icj-cij.org/

International Criminal Court:

http://www.icc-cpi.int/

International Tribunal for Law of the Sea

http://www.itlos.org/

Permanent Court of Arbitration

http://www.pca-cpa.org/

European Court of Human Rights

http://www.echr.coe.int/echr/

International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia:

http://www.un.org/icty/

International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda:

http://www.ictr.org/

Special Court for Sierra Leone

http://www.sc-sl.org/

 

Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia:

http://www.eccc.gov.kh/english/

 

Iraqi Special Tribunal

http://www.iraqispecialtribunal.org

Blogs on international law

International Law Reporter

http://ilreports.blogspot.co.il/

 

Lawfare

http://www.lawfareblog.com/

 

Opinio Juris

http://opiniojuris.org/

 

Legal Theory Blog

http://lsolum.typepad.com/legaltheory/

 

Kenneth Anderson Laws of War and Just War Theory:

http://kennethandersonlawofwar.blogspot.com/

 

IntLawGrrls:  Voices on international law, policy, practice:

http://intlawgrrls.blogspot.com/index.html

 

ECJ Blog

http://www.ecjblog.com/

 

EU Law and Politics

http://bloggingabouteulawandpolitics.blogspot.com/

 

EU Lawblog

http://eulawblogger.blogspot.com/

 

Georgetown International Law Blog:

http://explore.georgetown.edu/blogs/?BlogID=2

 

International Crimes Blog:

http://www.internationalcrimesblog.com/

 

International Environmental Law Blog:

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/intlenvironment/

 

Comparative Law Blog

http://comparativelawblog.blogspot.com/

 

International Economic Law and Policy Blog

http://worldtradelaw.typepad.com/

International Humanitarian law

ALMA - Association for the Promotion of International Humanitarian Law
http://www.alma-ihl.org/

Treaties and Customary Law

http://www.icrc.org/eng/war-and-law/treaties-customary-law/index.jsp

 

ICRC- What's new?

http://www.icrc.org/eng/home/whats-new/index.jsp

 

ICRC- Annual Report

http://www.icrc.org/eng/resources/annual-report/index.jsp

 

International Committee of the Red Cross:

http://www.icrc.org/

International Humanitarian Law Research Initiative

http://www.ihlresearch.org/ihl/

Human Rights Law

Human Rights Library

http://www1.umn.edu/humanrts/

Environmental Law

ASIL Guide to Environmental Law

http://www.asil.org/resource/env1.htm

Multilaterals Project, Fletcher School

http://fletcher.tufts.edu/multilaterals.html

Globelaw

http://www.globelaw.com

United Nations Environment  Programme

http://www.unep.org

Commission for Environmental Cooperation

http://www.cec.org

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

http://www.ipcc.ch

European Commission: Environment Directorate General

http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/environment/index_en.htm

European Environment Agency

http://www.eea.europa.eu

European Environmental Law

http://www.eel.nl

OECD: Environment Directorate

http://www.oecd.org/department/0,3355,en_2649_33713_1_1_1_1_1,00.html

OAS: Sustainable Development and Environment

http://www.oas.org/dsd

UN: Division for Sustainable Development

http://www.un.org/esa/sustdev

UN: Food and Agriculture Organization

http://www.fao.org

International Atomic Energy Agency

http://www.iaea.org

World Bank: Environment

http://go.worldbank.org/B28KB6VQQ0

World Meteorological Organization

http://www.wmo.ch

Asia-Pacific Center for Environmental Law

http://law.nus.edu.sg/apcel

Pace Virtual Environmental Law Library

http://www.law.pace.edu/environment/VEL.html

Greenpeace

http://www.greenpeace.org


International Organizations

United Nations

http://www.un.org

UN News Centre

http://www.un.org/News/

European Union

http://europa.eu.int

International Monetary Fund

www.imf.org

Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC):

http://www.apecsec.org.sg

Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN):

http://www.asean.or.id

Organization of American States -OAS: 

http://www.oas.org/

Amnesty International

http://www.amnesty.org

World Health Organization

http://www.who.int

International Maritime Organization

http://www.imo.org

International Organizations

Italy's Diplomatic and Parliamentary Practice on International Law

Thanks

We thank the following funds: 


Dr. Emilio von Hofmannsthal Fund 

Hersch Lauterpacht Fund 

Bruce W. Wayne Chair Fund

Archive

Meetings' Program – 2nd Semester, 2015-2016

Topics

Speakers

Date

International Tribunals and Collective Memory

Prof. Moshe Hirsch

1.3.16

  New Directions in the Study of International Law:
Treaty Interpretation in International Law (Shereshevsky)
An Unlikely Hard Place: The Surprising Role of International Law in U.S. Regulatory Rulemaking (Megido)

Mr. Yahli Shereshevsky

Ms. Tamar Megido

15.3.16

Updates on Developments in International Law:

TBD

29.3.16

Evolution of Investment Law in the Context of State-Driven Change and Arbitral Responses

Prof. Wolfgang Alschner 

24.5.16

Paris Climate Change Agreement

Prof. Daniel Bodansky

31.5.16

TBD

 Prof. Jeffrey Dunoff

7.6.16

The Case for an International Court of Civil Justice

Prof. Maya Steinitz

14.6.16

 

Meetings' Program – Second Semester, 2014-2015

Topics

Lecturers

Date

ICJ case concerning the Application of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (Croatia v. Serbia)

Prof. Andreas Zimmermann (University of Potsdam)

3/3/2015

The New Way of War: Is There a Duty to Use Drones?

 

Prof. Oren Gross 
(University of Minnesota)

18/3/2015

International Legal Theory and Psychology

Prof. Anne van-Aaken (University of St. Gallen)

14/4/2015

 

Resolution 242 Revisited: New Evidence on the Required Scope of Israeli Withdrawal

Prof. Eugene Kontorovich (Northwestern University)

28/4/2015

Lawyers in Warfare: Who Needs Them?

Dr.  Ziv Bohrer 
(Bar-Ilan University)

12/5/2015

WTO Panelists Are From Mars, ICSID Arbitrators Are From Venus: Why? And Does it Matter?

Prof. Joost Pauwelyn (Institute of International and Development Studies)

16/6/2015 (15:00)

TBA

Update meeting

23/6/2015

 

Meetings' Program – Second Semester, 2013-2014

Date

Speakers

Topics

18.2.14

Prof. Tomer Broude
Adv. Tal Mimran
Shany Friedmann

Updates on Recent Developments in International Law:
Decision Regarding Seals in the WTO
The Jones Judgment of the ECHR
Continental Shelf in the Arctic Ocean 

4.3.14

Prof. Yoram Haftel 

When Do States Renegotiate International Agreements? The Case of Bilateral Investment Treaties

18.3.14

Dr. Guy Harpaz

The EU's Insistence on Non-Extraterritorial Application of its Trade Agreements with Israel: A Paradigm Shift or PR Exercise?

29.4.14

Dr. Shai Dothan

Why Granting States a Margin of Appreciation Supports the Formation of a Genuine European Consensus

13.5.14

Prof. Eugene Kontorovich

State Practice on Economic Dealings With Occupied Territories

20.5.14

Prof. Robert Howse

Leo Strauss, Carl Schmitt and 'German Nihilism'

10.6.14

Dr. Tilmann Altwicker

What is Transnational Counter-Terrorism Law? – Prevention and Human Rights

17.6.14

Prof. Robbie Sabel, Dr. Yael Ronen, Yahli Shereshevsky

Updates on Recent Developments in International Law

 

Meetings' Program – 1st Semester, 2013-2014

Date

Speakers

Topics

22.10.13

Prof. Moshe Hirsch

Prof. Robbie Sabel – Humanitarian Intervention

Dr. Eitan Barak – Chemical Weapons

Dr. Gilad Noam – International Criminal Law

The Conflict in Syria: An International Law Perspective

29.10.13

Prof. Malcolm N. Shaw

Legality and Legitimacy in International Law (Will be held at Beit Maiersdorf, Romm 501)

5.11.13

Prof. Anne Peters

International Constitutional Law - Are we Moving towards Constitutionalization of the World Community?

12.11.13

Prof. Tomer Broude

Behavioral International Law

26.11.13

Dr. Tally Kritzman-Amir

Dr. Rotem Giladi

The Status of Refugees in Israel – Past and Present

17.12.13

Prof. Dan Bodansky - Canceled

"The Who, What and Wherefore of Geoengineering Governance" (121 Climate Change 539)

24.12.13

Prof. Ruti Teitel

Transitional Justice and Judicial Activism – A Right to Accountability?

6.1.13

16:00-20:00 in Beit Meirsdorf, Mt. Scopus, The Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

The Annual conference of the International Law Forum

14.1.14

Adv. Hile Echerman, Adv. Daniel Geron, Dr. Shai Dothan

Updates on Recent Developments in International Law

   

Meetings' Program – 2nd Semester, 2012-2013

Date

Speakers

Topics

23.4.13

Prof. Christoph Schreuer

Do We Really Need International Investment Arbitration

9.4.13

Prof. Dan Joyner

International Legal Issues relevant to Iran's Nuclear Program

5.3.13

The Turkel Report: Prof. Yuval Shany The Nature of Investigations: Dr. Michelle Lesh

The Nature of Investigations under International Law: Reflections on the Turkel Report and Beyond

9.4.13

Prof. Dan Joyner

International Legal Issues relevant to Iran's Nuclear Program

23.4.13

Prof. Christoph Schreuer

Do We Really Need International Investment Arbitration

30.4.13

Prof. Yuval Shany

Liron A. Libman

Alexandra Manea

Updates on Recent Developments in International Law

7.5.13

Prof. Eyal Benvenisti

The Contributions of National and International Courts to Domestic Democratic Processes

21.5.13

Prof. Asif Efrat

Combating the Kidney Commerce: Civil Society against Organ Trafficking in Pakistan and Israel

4.6.13

Marcia Harpaz

Assessing China's WTO Compliance after a Decade in the WTO

11.6.13

Prof. Marcelo Kohen

Uti Possidetis and Maritime Delimitations

18.6.13

Prof. Yuval Shany, Dean of the faculty
Dr. Gilad Noam
Ben Clarke

Updates on Recent Developments in International Law

 

Other Meetings and Conventions:

  • On November 5, 2013 Professor Anne Peters, Director at the Max-Planck-Institute for Comparative Public Law and Public International Law, Heidelberg, discussed the topic "International Constitutional Law".
  • On October 29, 2013, Professor Malcolm Shaw, Sir Robert Jennings Professor of International Law, University of Leicester; and Senior Fellow, Lauterpacht Centre for International Law, University of Cambridge discussed the topic - "Legality and Legitimacy in International Law".
  • on Tuesday, June 11, 2013 Prof. Marcelo Kohen, the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva, will discussed the topic "Uti Possidetis and Maritime Delimitations".
  • on Tuesday, June 4, 2013, Marcia Don Harpaz, discussed the topic "Assessing China's WTO Compliance after a Decade in the WTO".
  • on Tuesday, May 21, 2013, Prof. Asif Efrat, from the Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya, discussed his paper "Combating the Kidney Commerce: Civil Society against Organ Trafficking in Pakistan and Israel".
  • on Tuesday, 7 May 2013, Prof. Eyal Benvenisti discussed he's paper on the topic: Democracy Enhancing Courts: How National and International Courts Are Cooperating to Solve Global Democratic Dilemmas (coauthored with George W. Downs).
  •  On Tuesday, 30 April 2013, recent developments in International law were discussed:
  1. Prof. Yuval Shany, the Dean of the faculty, discussed the process of strengthening the human rights treaty bodies (as background reading material attached is the report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the strengthening of treaty bodies. Please read the Introduction and sections 1 and 2 of the report).
  2. Liron A. Libman will discussed the new arms trade treaty (follow this link to a blog post by Liron on the subject).
  3. Alexandra Manea discussed the recent Judgment of the European Court of Human Rights in the case of Catan and others v. Moldova and Russia.
  • On Tuesday, April 23, 2013, Prof. Christoph Schreuer discussed the topic "Do We Really Need International Investment Arbitration?"
  • On Tuesday, April 9 2013, Prof. Dan Joyner presented the topic: "International Legal Issues relevant to Iran's Nuclear Program". 
  • On April 3rd 2013, at the Igal Arnon Law and History Workshop, Tel Aviv University Faculty of law, hosted Alan Nissen, for a presentation of his article- 
    The Turn to Technique in International Law.
     

 

Labour Law and Social Security Forum

The Labour Law and Social Security Forum is a research center dedicated to the fields of labour, employment, social security and welfare law. It serves as a basis and provides supportive framework for research, teaching and public discussion in these fields among scholars from various relevant disciplines, research students, judges, practitioners and activists. The Forum is a member of the Labour Law Research Network.

 

The activities of the Forum are supported by the Elias Lieberman Chair in Labor Law Fund.

 

The Forum organizes workshops, conferences and special lectures. Most of our events are conducted in Hebrew; the full details can be found on the Hebrew pages. Events held in English are also listed below. 

 

The Furom coordinator is Prof. Guy Davidov. To join our mailing list and receive updated on events, please write to Prof. Davidov.

 

Faculty members specializing in labour law:

Prof. Guy Davidov

Dr. Einat Albin

 

Additional lecturers:

Judge Steve Adler

Judge Varda Wirth Livne

Dr. Hani Ofek

Adv. David Lupo

 

Doctoral canadidates:

Sima Kramer

Tammy Katsabian

 

Events in English during the 2016/17 academic year:

16:30-18:00, room 119

 

Nov. 27, 2016

Dr. Arian Renan - Barzilay, Haifa University 

“Platform Inequality: Gender in the Gig Economy”

 

Dec. 11, 2016

Dr. Avishai Benish, Hebrew University

“Infusing Public Law into Privatized Welfare: Lawyers, Economists and the Competing Logics of Administrative Reform”

 

Dec. 18, 2016

Dr. Einat Albin, Hebrew University

“Marketplace Intimacy”

 

Jan. 1, 2017

Prof. Claudia Schubert, Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany

Digitalization of the Working World and Crowdsourcing

 

Jan. 29, 2017

Dr. Pnina Alon-Shenker, Ryerson University, Canada

“The Aging Workforce in Canada”

 

Feb. 5, 2017, 16:00, The Belgium House, Edmond J. Safra Campus 

Symposium on Guy Davidov, A Purposive Approach to Labour Law (Oxford University Press 2016).

Opening remarks: Prof. Aharon Barak, formerly President of the Israeli Supreme Court. Discussants: Prof. Harry Arthurs (Osgoode Hall), Prof. Simon Deakin (Cambridge), Prof. Ruth Dukes (Glasgow), Prof. Guy Mundlak (Tel-Aviv), Dr. Einat Albin (Hebrew U). Reply: Prof. Guy Davidov (Hebrew U).

 

Law and Criminology in Cyberspace

Law and Society Workshop

The workshop will focus on current issues in the intersection of law and society, with a special emphasis on law, social work and social policy, discussing research papers or seminal works in this field. In addition, some meetings will be devoted to public and practice-related issues related to law and society in the public sector, the business sector, civil society and the legal system. 


Nine meetings will be held during the semester. In general, in each meeting an article will be presented by the author or by leading scholars in the field, followed by two or three responses by the workshop participants. Subsequently, the article will be discussed by all workshop participants. Participants are required to submit a short written response to the article (up to two pages) with respect to at least six of these articles. 

Law, Economic and Empirical Legal Studies Workshop

This workshop will provide students with an opportunity to engage with ongoing research in the economic analysis of law. The workshop will meet 9 times over the semester. At every meeting invited speakers will present works in progress. 

Meetings

Monday 14:30-16:00, Room 119

31.10        Introductory meeting for students

7.11          Yotam Kaplan, Harvard Law School

14.11        Ronen Avraham, Tel-Aviv University

28.11        Yuval Feldman, Bar-Ilan University

12.12        Adam Chilton, University of Chicago Law School

19.12        Ofer Eldar, Duke Law School           

26.12        Zachary Liscow, Yale Law School

16.1          Shaul Shalvi, University of Amsterdam

23.1          Amir Licht, IDC

Law and Economics Forum

The law and economics forum organizes the research and teaching activity in the faculty in the field of the economic analysis of law. The forum functions as an intellectual cross roads in which scholars from different fields including law, economics, psychology, philosophy, psychology and political science can meet and discuss their work. The activity of the forum includes, among other things, a workshop in which faculty members and students discuss current work in the field, and international conferences that deal with specific topics in depth. The forum supports several graduate students each year that dedicate their time to research.
 
The law and economics forum is supported by generous donations from:
  • The Milton Handler Foundation
  • The Avraham Herman Foundation
The faculty members who are actively engaged in the activity of the forum are: 
  
Links

Law and Philosophy Forum

The Law and Philosophy Forum at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem facilitates intellectual interaction between faculty members and students in various academic units within the university whose academic interests lie in the areas where philosophy and legal scholarship intersect.


The members of the forum include faculty members from the Faculty of Law, the Philosophy Department (in the Faculty of the Humanities) and the Political Science Department (in the Faculty of Social Sciences). The forum collaborates on a regular basis with the Centre for Ethics and Political Philosophy (at the Philosophy Department) and the Jerusalem Forum for Political Philosophy (at the Political Science Department). Together, the group of the Forum members comprises a research force of the highest quality, by international as well as Israeli standards.


Forum Members (at the Faculty of Law): David Enoch; Leora Dahan Katz; Dana Gur; Alon Harel; Ori Herstein; Ofer Malcai; Ram Rivlin; Re'em Segev.


The activity of the Forum includes conferences, workshops and courses. Previous guests in these academic events include: Vincent Chiao, Julia Driver, Antony Duff, Liz Emens, David Estlund, Barbara Herman, John Finnis, Chaim Gans, John Gardner, Ruth Gavison, James Griffin, Scott Hershovitz, Iwao Hirose, Douglas Husak, Richard Kraut, Will Kymlicaka, Rae Langton, Judith Lichtenberg, Elinor Mason, Jeff McMahan, John Mikhail, Michael Otsuka, Japa Pallikkathayil, David Plunkett, Joseph Raz, Daniel Statman, Saul Smilansky, Andrew Sepielli, Holy Smith, Victor Tadros, Larry Temkin, Ruth Weinraub, Gideon Yaffe, and Michael Zimmerman.


The forum allocates the Law & Philosophy Prize for excellent papers written by students in the area of philosophy and law.


The Forum benefits from the generous support of the Greene Foundation.

Donors

Israel B. Greene was a man totally dedicated to the law in all its aspects.  He was first and foremost an outstanding legal scholar and lecturer in law, primarily in the field of Equity, which was his professional passion.


The Fund for Equity Studies is a singular memorial to Israel B. Greene and Sara Mann Greene, supporting the Law and Philosophy Forum, providing scholarships and fellowships for promising young scholars, enriching the Law Library, and supporting a publications program. It enhances the work being done at the Hebrew University in a field that is fundamental to the idea of Justice.

Public Law Forum

The Public Law Forum is a research center in the fields of constitutional law and administrative law for researchers and students of the faculty. The activity of the forum includes conferences and workshops as well as financial support for students.

For details about the Forum please write to Barak Medina or to Yoav Dotan.

   

Forum Members

  • Dr. Margit Cohn
  • Prof. Yoav Dotan
  • Prof. Michael Karayanni
  • Prof. Barak Medina
  • Ronen Polliack
  • Dr. Re’em Segev
  • Prof. Yuval Shani
  • Prof. Shimon Shetreet
  • Dr. Keren Weinshall-Margel

 

PUBLIC LAW AND HUMAN RIGHTS RESEARCH WORKSHOP, SEMESTER 2, 2017 - Click here

 

Public Law and Human Rights Research Workshop

 

PUBLIC LAW AND HUMAN RIGHTS RESEARCH WORKSHOP, SEMESTER 2, 2017

CONVENOR: PROFESSOR MARGIT COHN
WEDNESDAYS, 16:30-18:00, ROOM 119
 

Paper

Presenter

Date

The Relationship between Canada and Indigenous People: Past, Present and Future. Public Lecture, the Halbert Centre for Canadian Studies, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem Note: special event, room 502, Meiersdorf Club.

Justice Frank Iacobucci, Supreme Court of Canada (retired)

1.3

Constitutionalism in the Shadow of Populist Politics.

Alon Harel, Hebrew University

8.3

Constitutional Design Without Constitutional Moments: Lessons from Religiously Divided Societies

Hani Lerner, Tel Aviv University

15.3

The Vulnerability of Dual Citizenship: From Supranational Subject to Citizen to Subject?

Kim Rubenstein, Australian National College of Law

22.3

Action Expresses Priorities: Judicial Anti-Corruption Enforcement Can Enhance Electoral Accountability

Yoav Dotan, Hebrew University

19.4

The functions of the Chilean Contraloría General de la República and the procedure of toma de razón

Gabriel Bocksang Hola, Pontifical Catholic University of Chile

26.4

Social Impact Discrimination: Religious Communities and the Regulation of the Liberal Risk

Netta Barak-Coren, Hebrew University

3.5

Adjudicating Women’s Exclusion in Israel: The First Thirty Years

Yofi Tirosh, Tel Aviv University

10.5

The Patronizing Trap: Constitutional Rights, 
Risks and the Transnational Dimension

Amnon Reichman, Haifa University

17.5

Rights Without Resources: The Impact of Constitutional Social Rights on Social Spending

Mila Versteeg, University of Virginia

7.6

DOMESTIC HUMAN-RIGHTS ADJUDICATION IN THE SHADOW OF INTERNATIONAL LAW: THE STATUS OF HUMAN RIGHTS CONVENTIONS IN ISRAEL

Prof. Barak Medina, Hebrew University

14.6

All Roads Lead to Strasbourg?:

Application of the Margin of Appreciation Doctrine by the European Court of Human Rights and the UN Human Rights Committee

Yuval Shani, Hebrew University

21.6

TBD

Barak Medina, Hebrew University

28.6

 

 

Tax Law Forum

The Israeli Private Law Association

The Israeli Private Law Association was established in 2009 as a framework for inter-institutional collaboration. The Association serves as a framework for nurturing academic discourse between scholars and graduate students who share interest in studying the various fields that are clustered under the broad title of private law.  


   
The Association usually holds two annual events: Annual Academic Meeting and Annual Public Conference. 
In 2015, the academic conference was held on April 29, 2015, at the Haim Striks School of Law, the College of Management - Academic Studies.


   
The Association was founded by Professor Daphna Lewinsohn-Zamir (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem), Chair; Professor Hanoch Dagan (Tel Aviv University), and Professor Shahar Lifshitz (Bar Ilan University).


   
The organizing committee for the 2016 Conference is Professor Gideon Parchomovsky (Bar Ilan University), Chair; Professor Shelly Kreiczer Levy (College of Law and Business), and Professor Amir Licht (IDC Herzliya).


   
To join the Association and for further details, please contact the Secretary of the Association, Dr. Ronit Levine-Schnur at ronit.levine@mail.huji.ac.il